964 research outputs found

    Facilitating open exchange of data and information

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    By broad consensus, Open Data presents great value. However, beyond that simple statement, there are a number of complex, and sometimes contentious, issues that the science community must address. In this review, we examine the current state of the core issues of Open Data with the unique perspective and use cases of the ocean science community: interoperability; discovery and access; quality and fitness for purpose; and sustainability. The topics of Governance and Data Publication are also examined in detail. Each of the areas covered are, by themselves, complex and the approaches to the issues under consideration are often at odds with each other. Any comprehensive policy on Open Data will require compromises that are best resolved by broad community input. In the final section of the review, we provide recommendations that serve as a starting point for these discussion

    A map series of the Southern East Pacific Rise and its flanks, 15� S to 19� S

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    Four large-scale bathymetric maps of the Southern East Pacific Rise and its flanks between 15 S and 19 S display many of the unique features of this superfast spreading environment, including abundant seamounts (the Rano Rahi Field), axial discontinuities, discontinuity migration, and abyssal hill variation. Along with a summary of the regional geology, these maps will provide a valuable reference for other sea-going programs on- and off-axis in this area, include the Mantle ELectromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) experiment

    OncoLog, Volume 46, Number 01, January 2001

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    New Melanoma Staging System Reflects Key Prognostic Factors House Cell: Preventing Cancer: Food for Thought Educational Conferences Explore Issues Related to Cancer Care and Research DiaLog: Leukemia: Setting the Stage for Effective Treatments, by Emil J. Freireich, MD, Professor, Department of Leukemia Updated M. D. Anderson Website Designed to Meet the Online Needs of Patients and Physicianshttps://openworks.mdanderson.org/oncolog/1092/thumbnail.jp

    Facilitating open exchange of data and information

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    Author Posting. © The Author(s), 2014. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Springer for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Earth Science Informatics 8 (2015): 721-739, doi:10.1007/s12145-014-0202-2.By broad consensus, Open Data presents great value. However, beyond that simple statement, there are a number of complex, and sometimes contentious, issues that the science community must address. In this review, we examine the current state of the core issues of Open Data with the unique perspective and use cases of the ocean science community: interoperability; discovery and access; quality and fitness for purpose; and sustainability. The topics of Governance and Data Publication are also examined in detail. Each of the areas covered are, by themselves, complex and the approaches to the issues under consideration are often at odds with each other. Any comprehensive policy on Open Data will require compromises that are best resolved by broad community input. In the final section of the review, we provide recommendations that serve as a starting point for these discussions.The authors acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through Grant Award No. OCE-1143683.2016-01-0

    Cretaceous fore-arc basalts from the Tonga arc: Geochemistry and implications for the tectonic history of the SW Pacific

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    Highlights: • The geochemistry of a Cretaceous Tongan fore-arc basalt (FAB) suite is reported. • The Tonga FAB suite is very similar to the Poya Terrane basalts of New Caledonia. • Similar geochemistry to IBM FAB but not associated with subduction initiation • Possibly a remnant of the hypothesized back-arc East New Caledonia Basin Abstract: The Tonga fore-arc preserves a complex history of subduction initiation, back-arc basin formation and arc volcanism which has extended from the Cretaceous to the present. In this paper, we discuss the geochemistry of a Cretaceous basalt/dolerite/gabbro suite recovered in two dredges from the Tonga fore-arc at ~ 19°S. The geochemistry of the Tonga fore-arc suite is unlike that of the uniformly depleted MORB basalts of the subducting Pacific Plate and therefore is unlikely to be accreted from Pacific Cretaceous crust. The ~ 102 Ma age obtained for one Tongan fore-arc dolerite is contemporaneous with a major phase of Cretaceous subduction-related volcanism, recorded both in detrital zircon age populations and associated volcanics from New Caledonia and New Zealand. We believe that the Tonga fore-arc basalts are a remnant of a hypothesized, once extensive Cretaceous back-arc basin, called the East New Caledonia Basin, which we propose to have existed from ~ 102 to 50 Ma. The allochthonous Poya Terrane of New Caledonia is geochemically very similar to the Tonga fore-arc basalts and represents a younger (~ 84–55 Ma) remnant of the same basin. Subduction-related Cretaceous volcanics from the SW Pacific, representing both arc and back-arc settings, all appear to have similar Zr/Nb values, suggesting a common mantle component in their petrogenesis. The Tonga fore-arc basalts are also similar to fore-arc basalts recovered from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc, but unlike these basalts they are not associated with subduction initiation
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