446 research outputs found

    New World Limnichinae IV. \u3ci\u3eEulimnichus\u3c/i\u3e Casey. B. Descriptions of New Species (Coleoptera: Limnichidae)

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    Thirteen new species of Eulimnichus are described: Eulimnichus visendus, corrinae, langleyae, coheni, improcerus, pellucidus, sharpi, incultus, rugulosus, nrsticus, acutus, subitus, and spangleri. A key to the 27 known species is included

    New World Limnichinae III. A Revision of \u3ci\u3eLimnichites\u3c/i\u3e Casey (Coleoptera: Limnichidae)

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    A diagnosis is given for the genus Limnichites. Descriptions and a key to separate the 12 known species, including five new species, are presented. The new species are Limnichites imparatus, L. porrectus. rudis, L. browni, L. simplex

    New World Limnichinae IV. \u3ci\u3eEulimnichus\u3c/i\u3e Casey. A. Synonymies, Lectotype Designations, and Redescriptions (Coleoptera: Limnichidae)

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    A recharacterization of Eulimnichus and redescriptions for all previously described species are presented. In most cases, illustrations of the aedeagus are also presented. Seven names are placed in synonymy, and a new name E. impostus, is proposed for E. elongatus (Pic) which is preoccupied. Lectotype designations are made for 10 of the 14 species and one synonymous species

    National business regulations and city entrepreneurship in Europe: a multilevel nested analysis

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    This article provides and tests a theoretical framework with a multilevel (country–city) nested model to analyze the relationship between national business regulations (NBRs) and city level entrepreneurship. While public interest theory predicts a positive relationship between NBR and city level entrepreneurship, public choice theory predicts the opposite, a negative relationship. Based on multilevel analysis for a matched country–city panel of 228 cities across 20 European countries for the years 2004 to 2009, the empirical evidence from panel data estimation explains how changes in NBRs influence changes in city level entrepreneurial activity over time

    Determinants of occupational mobility: the importance of place of work

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    The LSCS is supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)/JISC, the Scottish Funding Council, the Chief Scientist’s Office, and the Scottish government.This research focuses on individual and place-based determinants of occupational mobility in Scotland over the period 2001–11. Its originality relates to the importance of workplace location, rather than residential locations, on occupational mobility, and in questioning the idea that spatial mobility accelerates occupational mobility. The findings also indicate that skill level and employment in ‘knowledge-intensive’ sectors are key determinants of career progression. Urban career escalator effects are found to be particularly evident for higher-skilled workers. The findings point to the importance of spatial sophistication and sectoral sensitivity in understandings of occupational mobility.PostprintPeer reviewe

    Influence of the combination and phase variation status of the haemoglobin receptors HmbR and HpuAB on meningococcal virulence

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    Neisseria meningitidis can utilize haem, haemoglobin and haemoglobin–haptoglobin complexes as sources of iron via two TonB-dependent phase variable haemoglobin receptors, HmbR and HpuAB. HmbR is over-represented in disease isolates, suggesting a link between haemoglobin acquisition and meningococcal disease. This study compared the distribution of HpuAB and phase variation (PV) status of both receptors in disease and carriage isolates. Meningococcal disease (n = 214) and carriage (n = 305) isolates representative of multiple clonal complexes (CCs) were investigated for the distribution, polyG tract lengths and ON/OFF status of both haemoglobin receptors, and for the deletion mechanism for HpuAB. Strains with both receptors or only hmbR were present at similar frequencies among meningococcal disease isolates as compared with carriage isolates. However, >90 % of isolates from the three CCs CC5, CC8 and CC11 with the highest disease to carriage ratios contained both receptors. Strains with an hpuAB-only phenotype were under-represented among disease isolates, suggesting selection against this receptor during systemic disease, possibly due to the receptor having a high level of immunogenicity or being inefficient in acquisition of iron during systemic spread. Absence of hpuAB resulted from either complete deletion or replacement by an insertion element. In an examination of PV status, one or both receptors were found in an ON state in 91 % of disease and 71 % of carriage isolates. We suggest that expression of a haemoglobin receptor, either HmbR or HpuAB, is of major importance for systemic spread of meningococci, and that the presence of both receptors contributes to virulence in some strains

    Sheep Updates 2005 - Part 6

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    This session covers seven papers from different authors: PASTURES/GRAZING 1. New annual pastures - quality and quantity for fodder conservation?, Sarah Pugh and Giles Glasson, Department of Agriculture Western Australia 2. Saltland Pastures: Dispelling some Myths, Ed Barrett-Lennard1,3, Hayley Norman2,3, Matt Wilmat2,3, Meir Altman,3, Kelly Pearce2,3, Sally Phelan4, David Masters2,3, 1. Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, 2 CSIRO Livestock Industries, Floreat, WA, 3. CRC for Plant-based Management of Dryland Salinity 4. Saltland Pastures Association 3. Pastures: Putting profit back into sandplain, Nadine Eva, Department of Agriculture Western Australia. 4. Pastures from Space R - Can be used to make profitable strategic and tactical management decisions on farm, Brad Wooldridge, Farmer Wagin WA, Stephen Gherardi, Lucy Anderton, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Gonzalo Mata, CSIRO Livestock Industries, Wembley, WA 5. Are new farming systems based on perenial pastures in south west Australia more profitable?, P. Sanford, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, J. Young, Farm Systems Analysis, Kojonup WA 6. Sown fodders, rotational grazing and Merinos make money in a drought, Tim Wiley, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Richard Quinlan, Planfarm, Geraldton 7. Lifetime Wool - The \u27best bet\u27 optimum condition score profile for Merino ewes lambing in winter. Chris Oldham, Mike Hyder, Mandy Curnow, Samantha Giles, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, John Young, Farming Systems Analysis Service, Kojonup, Andrew Thompson, DPI Victoria, Hamilton

    Targeted suppression of autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation using blocking anti-CD8 antibodies

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    CD8+ T-cells play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. However, drugs that target the entire CD8+ T-cell population are not desirable because the associated lack of speci city can lead to unwanted consequences, most notably an enhanced susceptibility to infection. Here, we show that autoreactive CD8+ T-cells are highly dependent on CD8 for ligand-induced activation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). In contrast, pathogen-speci c CD8+ T-cells are relatively CD8-independent. These generic di erences relate to an intrinsic dichotomy that segregates self-derived and exogenous antigen-speci c TCRs according to the monomeric interaction a nity with cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI). As a consequence, “blocking” anti-CD8 antibodies can suppress autoreactive CD8+ T-cell activation in a relatively selective manner. These ndings provide a rational basis for the development and in vivo assessment of novel therapeutic strategies that preferentially target disease-relevant autoimmune responses within the CD8+ T-cell compartment
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