1,302 research outputs found

    Pd‐Catalyzed C−C, C−N, and C−O Bond‐Forming Difunctionalization Reactions of Alkenes Bearing Tethered Aryl/Alkenyl Triflates

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    Over the past few years our group has described a new type of alkene difunctionalization reaction in which aryl or alkenyl triflates bearing tethered alkenes are coupled with various nucleophiles to afford carbocyclic products. The products are formed in moderate to good chemical yield, with generally high levels of stereoselectivity. Our progress to date in this area, which includes reactions of amine, alcohol, enolate, and indole nucleophiles, is described in this review.Peer Reviewedhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/154890/1/ijch201900108_am.pdfhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/154890/2/ijch201900108.pd

    Draft Genome Sequence of Micrococcus luteus (Schroeter) Cohn (ATCC 12698)

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    The actinobacterium Micrococcus luteus can be found in a wide variety of habitats. Here, we report the 2,411,958-bp draft genome sequence of the type strain M. leuteus (Schroeter) Cohn (ATCC 12698). Characteristic of this taxa, the genome sequence has a high G+C content, 73.14%

    Draft Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecalis ATCC BAA-2128

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    While a part of the native gut microflora, the Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis can lead to serious infections elsewhere in the body. The draft genome of E. faecalis strain ATCC BAA-2128, isolated from piglet feces, was examined. This draft genome consists of 42 contigs, 12 of which exhibit homology to annotated plasmids

    Draft Genome Sequences of Two ATCC Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Strains

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    Draft genome sequences for Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach ATCC 14458 and ATCC 27217 strains were investigated. The genome sizes were 2,880,761 bp and 2,759,100 bp, respectively. Strain ATCC 14458 was assembled into 39 contigs, including 3 plasmids, and strain ATCC 27217 was assembled into 25 contigs, including 2 plasmids

    Spatial and Temporal Trends in Travel for COVID-19 Vaccinations

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    Highlights : Disparities in distances people traveled for vaccinations by demographics exist. Males and White people traveled longer distances for vaccination appointments. Travel distances of over 10 miles for vaccination likely required motorized transportation. Introduction: Understanding spatial and temporal trends in travel for COVID-19 vaccinations by key demographic characteristics (i.e., gender, race, age) is important for ensuring equitable access to and increasing distribution efficiency of vaccines and other health services. The aim of this study is to examine trends in travel distance for COVID-19 vaccinations over the course of the vaccination rollout in North Carolina. Methods: Data were collected using electronic medical records of individuals who had first- or single-dose COVID-19 vaccination appointments through UNC Health between December 15, 2020, and August 31, 2021 (N = 204,718). Travel distances to appointments were calculated using the Euclidean distance from individuals’ home ZIP code centroids to clinic addresses. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models with individuals’ home ZIP codes incorporated as fixed effects were used to examine differences in travel distances by gender, race, and age. Results: Males and White individuals traveled significantly farther for vaccination appointments throughout the vaccination rollout. On average, females traveled 14. 4 miles, 3.5% shorter distances than males; Black individuals traveled 13.6 miles, 10.0% shorter distances than White individuals; and people aged 65 and older traveled 14.5 miles, 2.6% longer distances than younger people living in the same ZIP code. Conclusions: Controlling for socioeconomic status and spatial proximity to vaccination clinics at the ZIP code level, males and White individuals traveled longer distances for vaccination appointments, demonstrating more ability to travel for vaccinations. Results indicate a need to consider differential ability to travel to vaccinations by key demographic characteristics in COVID-19 vaccination programs and future mass health service delivery efforts

    Spatial and Temporal Trends in Travel for COVID-19 Vaccinations

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    Introduction: Understanding spatial and temporal trends in travel for COVID-19 vaccinations by key demographic characteristics (i.e., gender, race, age) is important for ensuring equitable access to and increasing distribution efficiency of vaccines and other health services. The aim of this study is to examine trends in travel distance for COVID-19 vaccinations over the course of the vaccination rollout in North Carolina. Methods: Data were collected using electronic medical records of individuals who had first- or single-dose COVID-19 vaccination appointments through UNC Health between December 15, 2020, and August 31, 2021 (N = 204,718). Travel distances to appointments were calculated using the Euclidean distance from individuals’ home ZIP code centroids to clinic addresses. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models with individuals’ home ZIP codes incorporated as fixed effects were used to examine differences in travel distances by gender, race, and age. Results: Males and White individuals traveled significantly farther for vaccination appointments throughout the vaccination rollout. On average, females traveled 14. 4 miles, 3.5% shorter distances than males; Black individuals traveled 13.6 miles, 10.0% shorter distances than White individuals; and people aged 65 and older traveled 14.5 miles, 2.6% longer distances than younger people living in the same ZIP code. Conclusions: Controlling for socioeconomic status and spatial proximity to vaccination clinics at the ZIP code level, males and White individuals traveled longer distances for vaccination appointments, demonstrating more ability to travel for vaccinations. Results indicate a need to consider differential ability to travel to vaccinations by key demographic characteristics in COVID-19 vaccination programs and future mass health service delivery efforts

    Individual and non‐additive effects of exotic sap‐feeders on root functional and mycorrhizal traits of a shared conifer host

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    Forest pests drive tree mortality through disruption of functional traits linked to nutrient acquisition, growth and reproduction. The impacts of attack by individual or multiple above‐ground herbivores on root functional traits critical to tree health have received little attention. This is especially true for exotic herbivores, organisms often found in disturbed forests. We excavated whole‐root systems from eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) individuals experimentally infested with hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA: Adelges tsugae) and elongate hemlock scale (EHS: Fiorina externa) individually, or in combination, for periods of 2 and 4 years. Below‐ground root biomass, functional traits and storage nutrients were measured to assess impacts of herbivory. We also quantified ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) colonisation of fine roots and used culture‐independent methods to examine EMF diversity. Trees infested with HWA had a greater root mass fraction (root to total biomass ratio), although feeding had no observable effects on root functional traits (e.g. specific root length) or on resource allocation to roots. HWA feeding did significantly reduce EMF colonisation of hemlock fine roots, though surprisingly, EMF diversity and that of other fungal associates were unaffected. In contrast to HWA, EHS (alone or in conjunction with HWA) feeding had no observable effect on below‐ground traits or EMF colonisation alone; however, its presence mediated HWA effects when trees were co‐infested. Simultaneous infestation within the same year yielded significant reductions in EMF colonisation, whereas prior EHS attack weakened HWA effects. Our results collectively suggest that prior EHS attack dampens the impact of HWA on below‐ground functional traits. This highlights how the timing and sequence of herbivore arrival can alter plant‐mediated interactions between herbivores and their effects on above–below‐ground linkages and associated tree health

    Polarization-Temperature Correlation from a Primordial Magnetic Field

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    We propose a new method for constraining a primordial homogeneous magnetic field with the cosmic microwave background. Such a field will induce an observable parity odd cross correlation between the polarization anisotropy and the temperature anisotropy by Faraday rotation. We analyze the necessary experimental features to match, and improve, current constraints of such a field by measuring this correlation.Comment: 3 figure
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