1,385 research outputs found

    Robert S. Hoffmann: 1929–2010.

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    Survival and Flight Characteristics of Captive-Reared and Wild Northern Bobwhites in Texas

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    Introductions of captive-reared northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) to bolster native populations have been largely unsuccessful. We compared the survival and flight characteristics of game-farm (n 46), first-generation (F1) (n = 48), wild translocated (n = 45), and wild native (n = 50) northern bobwhites. In November 1993, all birds were radio-collared, leg banded, sexed, and aged. Birds were then released on a study area in Brooks County, Texas in groups of about 15, 1 bird at a time. Upon release, the direction of departure, speed, and time required to reach cover were recorded. The mean flight speed and distance flown for wild bobwhites was significantly greater (P \u3c 0.01) than captive-reared bobwhites. Wild native, wild translocated, and F1 groups were non-randomly distributed in direction of departure at release site (P \u3c 0.01). Survival of wild groups was significantly higher than captive-raised groups (P \u3c 0.05). The major cause of mortality in all groups was mammalian depredation. Fifteen F1 quail and 1 game-farm quail integrated into wild coveys. Our results re-confirm the inability of game-farm and first-generation northern bobwhites to survive in the wild, and we offer flight speed as one potential causal factor

    Life Among the Muses: Papers in Honor of James S. Findley

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    Edited volume of papers Preface; Terry L. Yates The Academic Offspring of James S. Findley; Kenneth N. Geluso and Don E. Wilson Annotated Bibliography of James Smith Findley; William L. Gannon and Don E. Wilson Biogeography of Baja California Peninsular Desert Mammals; David J. Hafner and Brett R. Riddle Annotated Checklist of the Recent Land Mammals of Sonora, Mexico; William Caire On the Status of Neotoma varia from Isla Datil, Sonora; Michael A. Bogan Systematics, Distribution, and Ecology of the Mammals of Catamarca Province, Argentina; Michael A. Mares, Ricardo A. Ojeda, Janet K. Braun, and Ruben M. Barquez Similarity Coefficients and Relationships of Wisconsin-Age Faunas New Mexico and Trans-Pecos Texas; Arthur H. Harris Historical Implications and Characteristics of Assemblages of Small Mammals in West-Central Kansas; E.D. Fleharty and Rob Channell Mammal Species of Concern in New Mexico; Clyde Jones and C. Gregory Schmitt Non-Human Mortality, Injuries, and Possible Cannibalism in Utah Black Bears; Hal L. Black Skeletal Architecture of the Forelimbs in Kangaroo Rats (Heteromyidae: Dipodomys): Adaptations for Digging and Food Handling; Kerry S. Kilburn Puncturing Ability of Bat Canine Teeth: The Tip; Patricia W. Freeman and William N. Weins The Effects of Daily and Seasonal Temperature Variation on a Model of Competing Lizard Species; J.S. Scheibe A Comparison of Morphometric Techniques to Distinguish Sympatric Mussel Species (Family Unionidae) with Similar Shell Morphology; Patricia Mehlhop and Richard L. Cifelli Evaluation of Methods for Permanently Marking Kangaroo Rats (Dipodomys: Heteromyidae); Daniel F. Williams, Walter Tordoff Ill, and David J. Germano Influence of Proximity to Rivers on Chipmunk Vocalization Patterns; William L. Gannon Subnivean Foraging by Abert\u27s Squirrels; Richard B. Forbe

    Natural urine concentrations and composition in neotropical bats

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    1. 1. Among neotropical bats with subdivided renal medullae, some natural urine samples are equal in concentration to mean maximum calculated levels.2. 2. Natural urine osmotic pressures in frugivorous phyllostomids are less than in other phyllostomids which, in turn, are less than in insectivorous bats.3. 3. Urinary sodium (Na+) concentrations show no difference between frugivorous. insectivorous, and others, but urinary potassium (K+) levels in frugivores are higher than in other bats.4. 4. Natural urine concentrations are primarily related to diet and secondarily to environmental dehydration pressure.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/25423/1/0000872.pd

    Effects of captivity on thermoregulation and metabolism in Artibeus jamaicensis (chiroptera: phyllostomatidae)

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    1. 1. In the Jamaican fig-eating bat, Artibeus jamaicensis, oxygen consumption (OC in cm3/g per hr) and deep body temperature (Tb in [deg]C) are significantly related to ambient temperature (Ta in [deg]C) and length of time in captivity, but not to the direction (low to high or high to low) of Ta change.2. 2. OC and Tb levels as functions of Ta rapidly change from those characteristic of a non-homeothermic endotherm on the day of capture to values characteristic of a homeothermic endotherm within 3-6 days in captivity.3. 3. Jamaican fig-eating bats examined within 12 hr of capture were physiologically distinct from individuals of this species kept briefly (3 days) in captivity.4. 4. Bats tested within 12 hr of capture at Tas of 30 and 25[deg]C required 1/3 and 2/3 less metabolic energy, respectively, than bats maintained briefly in captivity.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/23721/1/0000693.pd

    Proximate, caloric, nitrogen and mineral composition of bodies of some tropical bats

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    Proximate (live mass, water, lipid, ash, non-fat organic), caloric, nitrogen, and mineral (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and iron) concentrations and total body content of individuals of 24 species of Neotropical and Paleotropical bats were determined. Mass-related, concentration patterns were found for all measured variables, except iron. Concentrations increase with size for nitrogen, calcium, and magnesium but are concave, opening upward, for sodium and potassium. These last two elements reach minimal concentrations in bats weighing about 22 and 28 g dry mass, respectively. Total body content of nitrogen and minerals was compared with amounts in similar-sized birds and tetrapodal mammals.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/31225/1/0000127.pd

    Two new species of Pteropus from Samoa, probably extinct.

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    37 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm. "June 25, 2009." Includes bibliographical references (p. 30-37).Two new species of flying foxes (genus Pteropus) from the Samoan archipelago are described on the basis of modern museum specimens collected in the mid-19th century. A medium-sized species (P. allenorum, n. sp.) is introduced from the island of Upolu (Independent Samoa), based on a specimen collected in 1856 and deposited in the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. It has not been collected again, and we regard it as almost certainly extinct. This species is smaller bodied and has much smaller teeth than both extant congeners recorded in the contemporary fauna of Samoa (Pteropus samoensis and P. tonganus). The closest relative of this new species may be Pteropus fundatus of northern Vanuatu. The disjunct historical distribution of these two small-toothed flying foxes (in Vanuatu and Samoa) suggests that similar species may have been more extensively distributed in the remote Pacific in the recent past. Another species, a very large flying fox with large teeth (P. coxi, n. sp.), is described from two skulls collected in Samoa in 1839-1841 during the U.S. Exploring Expedition; it too has not been collected since. This robust species resembles Pteropus samoensis and Pteropus anetianus of Vanuatu in craniodental conformation but is larger than other Polynesian Pteropus, and in some features it is ecomorphologically convergent on the Pacific monkey-faced bats (the pteropodid genera Pteralopex and Mirimiri). On the basis of eyewitness reports from the early 1980s, it is possible that this species survived until recent decades, or is still extant. These two new Samoan species join Pteropus tokudae of Guam, P. pilosus of Palau, P. subniger of the Mascarenes, and P. brunneus of coastal north-eastern Australia as flying foxes with limited insular distributions that survived at least until the 19th century but are now most likely extinct.American Museum of Natural History

    A Review of Corn Stalk Grazing on Animal Performance and Crop Yield

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    The highest cost to beef cow-calf and backgrounding operations is the feeding of stored feeds in winter months. Nebraska has an abundance of corn fields available for grazing following harvest. Utilization of corn crop residue is quite effective in reducing feed costs. There are a number of important considerations associated with residue utilization. Stocking rates, diet quality, genetically modified corn, subsequent crop yields and supplementation are discussed

    A Review of Corn Stalk Grazing on Animal Performance and Crop Yield

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    The highest cost to beef cow-calf and backgrounding operations is the feeding of stored feeds in winter months. Nebraska has an abundance of corn fields available for grazing following harvest. Utilization of corn crop residue is quite effective in reducing feed costs. There are a number of important considerations associated with residue utilization. Stocking rates, diet quality, genetically modified corn, subsequent crop yields and supplementation are discussed

    Lista atualizada de quirópteros da Amazônia Brasileira

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    We present an updated checklist on bats of the Amazon Basin in Brazil, based on our collection of 3.081 specimens in 12 areas in the Basin and a review of the existing literature. The list consists of 95 species belonging to 51 genera and 9 families: 3 species (Micronycteris hirsuta, Natalus stramineus and Rhogessa tumida) are being cited for the first time as present in the Amazon Basin; of the remaining 92 species reported by previous workers. 68 were registered and confirmed by the present authors.É apresentada uma lista atualizada de quirópteros da região amazônica brasileira, baseada em nossa coleção de 3.081 exemplares capturados em 12 áreas na Bacia Amazônica e com referência às literaturas anteriormente publicadas. A lista conta com 95 espécies de 51 gêneros e 9 famílias, sendo 3 espécies (Micronycteris hirsuta, Natalus stramineus e Rhogessa tumida) citadas pela primeira vez como ocorrendo na região; e das demais alistadas por pesquisadores anteriores, são registradas e confirmadas 68 espécies
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