348 research outputs found

    Learning as researchers and teachers: the development of a pedagogical culture for social science research methods

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    In light of calls to improve the capacity for social science research within UK higher education, this article explores the possibilities for an emerging pedagogy for research methods. A lack of pedagogical culture in this field has been identified by previous studies. In response, we examine pedagogical literature surrounding approaches for teaching and learning research methods that are evident in recent peer-reviewed literature. Deep reading of this literature (as opposed to systematic review) identifies different but generally complementary ways in which teachers of methods seek to elucidate aspects of the research process, provide hands-on experience and facilitate critical reflection. At a time when the advancement of research capacity is gaining prominence, both in the academy and in reference to the wider knowledge economy, this paper illustrates how teachers of methods are considering pedagogical questions and seeks to further stimulate debates in this area

    What are Qualitative Research Ethics?

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    This book is available as open access through the Bloomsbury Open Access programme and is available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. There has been an increasing interest in research ethics over the last decade given the increasing ethical regulation of social research. 'Ethical literacy' encourages researchers to understand and engage with the ethical issues that emerge in the process of research. This book provides a short, succinct and accessible overview of the field, highlighting the key issues and everyday ethical dilemmas that researchers are likely to face in different contexts. Covering a range of methods, the book provides clear guidance for researchers on how to identify an approach that fits with their moral and intellectual framework. It explores ethical issues relating to 'traditional' research methods as well as to new and emerging methods and approaches - particularly visual and online methods

    What are Qualitative Research Ethics?

    Get PDF
    This book is available as open access through the Bloomsbury Open Access programme and is available on www.bloomsburycollections.com. There has been an increasing interest in research ethics over the last decade given the increasing ethical regulation of social research. 'Ethical literacy' encourages researchers to understand and engage with the ethical issues that emerge in the process of research. This book provides a short, succinct and accessible overview of the field, highlighting the key issues and everyday ethical dilemmas that researchers are likely to face in different contexts. Covering a range of methods, the book provides clear guidance for researchers on how to identify an approach that fits with their moral and intellectual framework. It explores ethical issues relating to 'traditional' research methods as well as to new and emerging methods and approaches - particularly visual and online methods

    Response to External Reviewer

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    Ecology, Information Literacy and Bernard Lonergan: A Librarian Immersed.

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    In spring 2013 a group of faculty and administrators completed a series of workshops exploring Bernard Lonergan\u27s General Empirical Method (GEM) and ways to apply it to our teaching. GEM invites students to learn how to think for themselves and discover themselves as learners. There are three initial steps - experiencing, understanding, and judging - which can readily be applied to searching, discovering and evaluating information resources. I report on my collaboration with a Biology professor teaching Ecology and Stewardship, where we jointly incorporated elements of GEM, information literacy and the research process and developed rubrics for assessing student work

    Ecology, Information Literacy and Bernard Lonergan: A Librarian Immersed.

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    Are print books dead? An investigation of book circulation at a mid-sized academic library

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    I analyzed circulation of print books at Seton Hall University Libraries using the WorldCat Analysis tool and Voyager data. Only 21.5% of our collection circulated between 2005 and 2009, but circulation varied by subject area. Circulation was higher for subjects with more current collections. Over one-third of recent science books circulated, while older science books had low circulation. Print book circulation declined by 23% between 2005 and 2009. Results of this study informed collection development and prompted a comprehensive weeding project, participation in an international scholarly reading study, and an e-book, patron-driven acquisition program

    The high cost of science journals: a case study and discussion

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    Like many libraries, Seton Hall University Libraries has suffered budget cuts that forced a reduction in serial subscriptions. As science librarian, I report on my efforts to streamline subscriptions and to address the question “Why are science journals so expensive?” Our science journals are significantly more expensive than journals in other areas. Our commercially published science journals are 25% more expensive than those from non-profit publishers, although the difference is not statistically significant. I discuss the reasons for the high cost of science journals, which involve a complex interaction between supply and demand and academic culture

    Winning letter: ACS Charleston Conference Scholarship

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    The set topic for this letter is: The University Librarian is a musicologist and wants to cut science budgets to allow for more humanities resources

    Reflections on Fake News, Librarians, and Undergraduate Research

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    The recent explosion of “fake news” highlights the need for academic libraries to provide access to reliable information resources and for librarians to instruct students in using them effectively. Providing reliable resources with minimal barriers to access involves cooperation among librarians, publishers, and vendors; however, I suggest that there is tension between our mutual desires to satisfy student demands for instant and perfect results and to encourage them to become persistent and critical information seekers. Many tools exist to assist students in gaining background information and limiting search results, but ultimately none replace the need to develop and explore questions and to evaluate information sources. In this paper I reflect on the difficulties of persuading students to persist in using library resources and the use of Bernard Lonergan’s generalized empirical method as a framework for critical thinking and information literacy
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