111,330 research outputs found

    Energetics of Domain Walls in the 2D t-J model

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    Using the density matrix renormalization group, we calculate the energy of a domain wall in the 2D t-J model as a function of the linear hole density \rho_\ell, as well as the interaction energy between walls, for J/t=0.35. Based on these results, we conclude that the ground state always has domain walls for dopings 0 < x < 0.3. For x < 0.125, the system has (1,0) domain walls with \rho_\ell ~ 0.5, while for 0.125 < x < 0.17, the system has a possibly phase-separated mixture of walls with \rho_\ell ~ 0.5 and \rho_\ell =1. For x > 0.17, there are only walls with \rho_\ell =1. For \rho_\ell = 1, diagonal (1,1) domain walls have very nearly the same energy as (1,0) domain walls.Comment: Several minor changes. Four pages, four encapsulated figure

    Are there socioeconomic gradients in stage and grade of breast cancer at diagnosis? Cross sectional analysis of UK cancer registry data

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    Socioeconomic gradients in uptake of breast cancer screening in the United Kingdom should, intuitively, lead to socioeconomic gradients in disease progression at diagnosis. However, studies have found little evidence of such an effect. Although this could be interpreted as evidence that socioeconomic gradients in uptake of screening do not have clinically important consequences, all of the published studies have used data from before (pre-1988) or during the early stages (1988-95) of implementation of the national breast cancer screening programme. We investigated the relation between socioeconomic position and progression of breast cancer at diagnosis by using recent data from the Northern and Yorkshire Cancer Registry and Information Service (NYCRIS), which is estimated to achieve around 93% ascertainment

    The Height Structure of the Solar Atmosphere from the EUV Perspective

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    We investigate the structure of the solar chromosphere and transition region using full Sun images obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The limb seen in the EIT coronal images (taken in lines of Fe IX/X at 171 \AA, Fe XII at 195 \AA and Fe XV at 284 \AA) is an absorption limb predicted by models to occur at the top of the chromosphere where the density of neutral hydrogen becomes significant (1010\sim10^{10} cm3^{-3}). The transition-region limb seen in He II 304 \AA images is an emission limb. We find: (1) the limb is higher at the poles than at the equator both in the coronal images (by 1300 ±\pm 650 km) and the 304 \AA images (by 3500 ±\pm 120 0 km); and (2) the 304 \AA limb is significantly higher than the limb in the coronal images. The height difference is 3100 ±\pm 1200 km at the equator, and 6600 ±\pm 1200 km at the poles. We suggest that the elevation of the 304 \AA limb above the limb in the coronal images may be due to the upper surface of the chromosphere being bumpy, possibly because of the presence of spicules. The polar extension is consistent with a reduced heat input to the chromosphere in the polar coronal holes compared with the quiet--Sun atmosphere at the equator.Comment: 6 pages, 2 figure

    The Density Matrix Renormalization Group Method and Large-Scale Nuclear Shell-Model Calculations

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    The particle-hole Density Matrix Renormalization Group (p-h DMRG) method is discussed as a possible new approach to large-scale nuclear shell-model calculations. Following a general description of the method, we apply it to a class of problems involving many identical nucleons constrained to move in a single large j-shell and to interact via a pairing plus quadrupole interaction. A single-particle term that splits the shell into degenerate doublets is included so as to accommodate the physics of a Fermi surface in the problem. We apply the p-h DMRG method to this test problem for two jj values, one for which the shell model can be solved exactly and one for which the size of the hamiltonian is much too large for exact treatment. In the former case, the method is able to reproduce the exact results for the ground state energy, the energies of low-lying excited states, and other observables with extreme precision. In the latter case, the results exhibit rapid exponential convergence, suggesting the great promise of this new methodology even for more realistic nuclear systems. We also compare the results of the test calculation with those from Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation and address several other questions about the p-h DMRG method of relevance to its usefulness when treating more realistic nuclear systems

    Reappraising elastic thickness variation at oceanic trenches

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    We reassess the variation of elastic thickness as a function of lithospheric plate age using a global database of bathymetric and free-air gravity profiles which are perpendicular to oceanic trenches. As in many previous studies, our starting point is the well-known floating elastic plate model. In order to remove the influence of short-wavelength features not associated with lithospheric bending, adjacent profiles from 10-Myr bins have been stacked together to construct average profiles with standard deviations. Each average profile was then inverted in a two-stage procedure. First, singular value decomposition was used to determine two unknown flexural parameters, together with a regional slope and offset, for any given elastic thickness. This procedure was repeated for a range of elastic thicknesses. Second, residual misfit was plotted as a function of elastic thickness, and the global minimum was identified. This two-stage procedure makes no prior assumptions about magnitude of the load, size of the bending moment, or whether the elastic plate is broken/continuous. We obtained excellent fits between theory and observation for both bathymetric and gravity profiles from lithosphere with an age range of 0–150 Ma. The shape of the residual misfit function indicates the degree of confidence we have in our elastic thickness estimates. The lower limit of elastic thickness is usually well determined but upper limits are often poorly constrained. Inverse modeling was carried out using a range of profile lengths (250–300, 500, and 700 km). In general, our estimates show no consistent increase of elastic thickness as a function of plate age. This surprising result is consistent with recent reassessments of elastic thickness beneath seamounts and implies either that elastic thickness is independent of plate age or that elastic thickness cannot be measured with sufficient accuracy to reveal such a relationship. Modeling of short free-air gravity profiles (250–300 km) does tentatively suggest that elastic thickness increases linearly from 5 to 10 km between 0 and 20 Ma and from 10 to 15 km between 20 and 150 Ma. This variation roughly matches the depth to the 200°C isotherm which corresponds to an homologous temperature of 0.4 for wet peridotite. Unfortunately, for longer profile lengths, there is no temporal dependence, and elastic thicknesses vary considerably for all plate ages. Bathymetric profile modeling yields similar results although uncertainties are larger

    Forbidden Line Emission in the Eccentric Spectroscopic Binaries DQ Tauri and UZ Tauri E Monitored over an Orbital Period

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    We present echelle spectroscopy of the close pre-main-sequence binary star systems DQ Tau and UZ Tau-E. Over a 16 day time interval we acquired 14 nights of spectra for DQ Tau and 12 nights of spectra for UZ Tau-E. This represents the entire phase of DQ Tau, and 63 percent of the phase of UZ Tau-E. As expected, photospheric lines such as Li I 6707 clearly split into two components as the primary and secondary orbit one another, as did the permitted line He I 5876. Unlike the photospheric features, the forbidden lines of [O I] 6300 and [O I] 5577, retain the same shape throughout the orbit. Therefore these lines must originate outside of the immediate vicinity of the two stars and any circumstellar disks that participate in the orbital motion of the stars.Comment: 14 pages including 6 figures, aastex preprint, accepted to Astronomical Journa

    Comment on ``Density-matrix renormalization-group method for excited states''

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    In a Physical Review B paper Chandross and Hicks claim that an analysis of the density-density correlation function in the dimerised Hubbard model of polyacetylene indicates that the optical exciton is bound, and that a previous study by Boman and Bursill that concluded otherwise was incorrect due to numerical innacuracy. We show that the method used in our original paper was numerically sound and well established in the literature. We also show that, when the scaling with lattice size is analysed, the interpretation of the density-density correlation function adopted by Chandross and Hicks in fact implies that the optical exciton is unbound.Comment: RevTeX, 10 pages, 4 eps figures fixed and included now in tex
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