1,770 research outputs found

    Decays of the Littlest Higgs Z_H and the Onset of Strong Dynamics

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    The Little Higgs mechanism, as realized in various models, requires a set of new massive gauge bosons, some of which mix with gauge bosons of the Standard Model. For a range of mixing angles the coupling of gauge bosons to scalars can become strong, ultimately resulting in a breakdown of perturbative calculation. This phenomenon is studied in the Littlest Higgs model, where the approach to strong dynamics is characterized by increasing tree-level decay widths of the neutral Z_H boson to lighter gauge bosons plus multiple scalars. These increasing widths suggest a distinctive qualitative collider signature for the approach to the strong coupling regime of large Higgs and other scalar multiplicities. In this work we catalog the kinematically allowed three-body decays of the Z_H, and calculate the partial width of the process Z_H to Z_L H H. This partial width is found to be larger than the comparable two-body decay Z_H to Z_L H for values of the SU(2) mixing angle cosine(theta) less than 0.13, indicating divergence of the littlest Higgs sigma field expansion at values of cosine(theta) larger than a simple parametric calculation would suggest. Additionally, we present analytical expressions for all two-body decays of the Littlest Higgs Z_H gauge boson, including the effects of all final-state masses

    M3^3: A New Muon Missing Momentum Experiment to Probe (g2)μ(g-2)_{\mu} and Dark Matter at Fermilab

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    New light, weakly-coupled particles are commonly invoked to address the persistent 4σ\sim 4\sigma anomaly in (g2)μ(g-2)_\mu and serve as mediators between dark and visible matter. If such particles couple predominantly to heavier generations and decay invisibly, much of their best-motivated parameter space is inaccessible with existing experimental techniques. In this paper, we present a new fixed-target, missing-momentum search strategy to probe invisibly decaying particles that couple preferentially to muons. In our setup, a relativistic muon beam impinges on a thick active target. The signal consists of events in which a muon loses a large fraction of its incident momentum inside the target without initiating any detectable electromagnetic or hadronic activity in downstream veto systems. We propose a two-phase experiment, M3^3 (Muon Missing Momentum), based at Fermilab. Phase 1 with 1010\sim 10^{10} muons on target can test the remaining parameter space for which light invisibly-decaying particles can resolve the (g2)μ(g-2)_\mu anomaly, while Phase 2 with 1013\sim 10^{13} muons on target can test much of the predictive parameter space over which sub-GeV dark matter achieves freeze-out via muon-philic forces, including gauged U(1)LμLτU(1)_{L_\mu - L_\tau}.Comment: 28 pages, 11 figures, 2 appendice

    DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A HIGGS-LIKE RESONANCE USING THE MATRIX ELEMENT LIKELIHOOD APPROACH

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    Understanding the exact mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking through the discovery and characterization of the Higgs boson is one of the primary goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Two searches for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of Z bosons with subsequent decays to either 2l2q or 4l are presented using data recorded with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS). The discovery and characteriza- tion of a Higgs-like resonance using a new set of tools is reported. The foundations of such tools are developed and prospects for their use in other Higgs channels and at future colliders are addressed. Although the Standard Model (SM) of electroweak in- teractions has been extremely successful in describing a number of phenomena, there are still questions to be addressed pertaining to its naturalness and its possible con- nection to beyond the SM physics. Results are interpreted in the context of possible extensions to the SM and their effect on our understanding of the universe

    New Searches for Muonphilic Particles at Proton Beam Dump Spectrometers

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    We introduce a new search strategy for visibly decaying muonphilic particles using a proton beam spectrometer modeled after the SpinQuest experiment at Fermilab. In this setup, a {\sim}100 GeV primary proton beam impinges on a thick fixed target and yields a secondary muon beam. As these muons traverse the target material, they scatter off nuclei and can radiatively produce hypothetical muonphilic particles as initial- and final-state radiation. If such new states decay to dimuons, their combined invariant mass can be measured with a downstream spectrometer immersed in a Tesla-scale magnetic field. For a representative setup with 3×10143\times 10^{14} muons on target with typical energies of \sim 20 GeV, a 15%15\% invariant mass resolution, and an effective 100 cm target length, this strategy can probe the entire parameter space for which \sim 200 MeV -- GeV scalar particles resolve the muon g2g-2 anomaly. We present sensitivity to these scalar particles at the SpinQuest experiment where no additional hardware is needed and the search could be parasitically executed within the primary nuclear physics program. Future proton beam dump experiments with optimized beam and detector configurations could have even greater sensitivity.Comment: v2: references added. v1: 16 pages, 11 figure

    US Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter 2017: Community Report

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    This white paper summarizes the workshop "U.S. Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter" held at University of Maryland on March 23-25, 2017.Comment: 102 pages + reference

    Dark sectors 2016 Workshop: community report

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    This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years

    A high efficiency photon veto for the Light Dark Matter eXperiment

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    Fixed-target experiments using primary electron beams can be powerful discovery tools for light dark matter in the sub-GeV mass range. The Light Dark Matter eXperiment (LDMX) is designed to measure missing momentum in high-rate electron fixed-target reactions with beam energies of 4 GeV to 16 GeV. A prerequisite for achieving several important sensitivity milestones is the capability to efficiently reject backgrounds associated with few-GeV bremsstrahlung, by twelve orders of magnitude, while maintaining high efficiency for signal. The primary challenge arises from events with photo-nuclear reactions faking the missing-momentum property of a dark matter signal. We present a methodology developed for the LDMX detector concept that is capable of the required rejection. By employing a detailed Geant4-based model of the detector response, we demonstrate that the sampling calorimetry proposed for LDMX can achieve better than 10⁻¹³ rejection of few-GeV photons. This suggests that the luminosity-limited sensitivity of LDMX can be realized at 4 GeV and higher beam energies

    A high efficiency photon veto for the Light Dark Matter eXperiment

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    Fixed-target experiments using primary electron beams can be powerful discovery tools for light dark matter in the sub-GeV mass range. The Light Dark Matter eXperiment (LDMX) is designed to measure missing momentum in high-rate electron fixed-target reactions with beam energies of 4 GeV to 16 GeV. A prerequisite for achieving several important sensitivity milestones is the capability to efficiently reject backgrounds associated with few-GeV bremsstrahlung, by twelve orders of magnitude, while maintaining high efficiency for signal. The primary challenge arises from events with photo-nuclear reactions faking the missing-momentum property of a dark matter signal. We present a methodology developed for the LDMX detector concept that is capable of the required rejection. By employing a detailed Geant4-based model of the detector response, we demonstrate that the sampling calorimetry proposed for LDMX can achieve better than 10⁻¹³ rejection of few-GeV photons. This suggests that the luminosity-limited sensitivity of LDMX can be realized at 4 GeV and higher beam energies

    Photon-rejection Power of the Light Dark Matter eXperiment in an 8 GeV Beam

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    The Light Dark Matter eXperiment (LDMX) is an electron-beam fixed-target experiment designed to achieve comprehensive model independent sensitivity to dark matter particles in the sub-GeV mass region. An upgrade to the LCLS-II accelerator will increase the beam energy available to LDMX from 4 to 8 GeV. Using detailed GEANT4-based simulations, we investigate the effect of the increased beam energy on the capabilities to separate signal and background, and demonstrate that the veto methodology developed for 4 GeV successfully rejects photon-induced backgrounds for at least 2×10142\times10^{14} electrons on target at 8 GeV.Comment: 28 pages, 20 figures; corrected author lis
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