14 research outputs found

    ENIGMA-anxiety working group : Rationale for and organization of large-scale neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders

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    Altres ajuts: Anxiety Disorders Research Network European College of Neuropsychopharmacology; Claude Leon Postdoctoral Fellowship; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation, 44541416-TRR58); EU7th Frame Work Marie Curie Actions International Staff Exchange Scheme grant 'European and South African Research Network in Anxiety Disorders' (EUSARNAD); Geestkracht programme of the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw, 10-000-1002); Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) program within the National Institute of Mental Health under the Intramural Research Program (NIMH-IRP, MH002781); National Institute of Mental Health under the Intramural Research Program (NIMH-IRP, ZIA-MH-002782); SA Medical Research Council; U.S. National Institutes of Health grants (P01 AG026572, P01 AG055367, P41 EB015922, R01 AG060610, R56 AG058854, RF1 AG051710, U54 EB020403).Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and disabling but seem particularly tractable to investigation with translational neuroscience methodologies. Neuroimaging has informed our understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety disorders, but research has been limited by small sample sizes and low statistical power, as well as heterogenous imaging methodology. The ENIGMA-Anxiety Working Group has brought together researchers from around the world, in a harmonized and coordinated effort to address these challenges and generate more robust and reproducible findings. This paper elaborates on the concepts and methods informing the work of the working group to date, and describes the initial approach of the four subgroups studying generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobia. At present, the ENIGMA-Anxiety database contains information about more than 100 unique samples, from 16 countries and 59 institutes. Future directions include examining additional imaging modalities, integrating imaging and genetic data, and collaborating with other ENIGMA working groups. The ENIGMA consortium creates synergy at the intersection of global mental health and clinical neuroscience, and the ENIGMA-Anxiety Working Group extends the promise of this approach to neuroimaging research on anxiety disorders

    Left ventricular blood flow kinetic energy after myocardial infarction - insights from 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Background: Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to complex changes in left ventricular (LV) haemodynamics that are linked to clinical outcomes. We hypothesize that LV blood flow kinetic energy (KE) is altered in MI and is associated with LV function and infarct characteristics. This study aimed to investigate the intra-cavity LV blood flow KE in controls and MI patients, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) four-dimensional (4D) flow assessment. Methods: Forty-eight patients with MI (acute-22; chronic-26) and 20 age/gender-matched healthy controls underwent CMR which included cines and whole-heart 4D flow. Patients also received late gadolinium enhancement imaging for infarct assessment. LV blood flow KE parameters were indexed to LV end-diastolic volume and include: averaged LV, minimal, systolic, diastolic, peak E-wave and peak A-wave KEiEDV. In addition, we investigated the in-plane proportion of LV KE (%) and the time difference (TD) to peak E-wave KE propagation from base to mid-ventricle was computed. Association of LV blood flow KE parameters to LV function and infarct size were investigated in all groups. Results: LV KEiEDV was higher in controls than in MI patients (8.5 ± 3 μJ/ml versus 6.5 ± 3 μJ/ml, P = 0.02). Additionally, systolic, minimal and diastolic peak E-wave KEiEDV were lower in MI (P < 0.05). In logistic-regression analysis, systolic KEiEDV (Beta = − 0.24, P < 0.01) demonstrated the strongest association with the presence of MI. In multiple-regression analysis, infarct size was most strongly associated with in-plane KE (r = 0.5, Beta = 1.1, P < 0.01). In patients with preserved LV ejection fraction (EF), minimal and in-plane KEiEDV were reduced (P < 0.05) and time difference to peak E-wave KE propagation during diastole increased (P < 0.05) when compared to controls with normal EF. Conclusions: Reduction in LV systolic function results in reduction in systolic flow KEiEDV. Infarct size is independently associated with the proportion of in-plane LV KE. Degree of LV impairment is associated with TD of peak E-wave KE. In patient with preserved EF post MI, LV blood flow KE mapping demonstrated significant changes in the in-plane KE, the minimal KEiEDV and the TD. These three blood flow KE parameters may offer novel methods to identify and describe this patient population

    Explicit Sequence Learning in Hybrid Visual Search in Younger and Older Age

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    Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Patients with Parkinson&rsquo;s Disease from the Perspective of Treating Physicians&mdash;A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

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    The COVID-19 pandemic has posed challenges to maintaining medical care for patients with Parkinson&rsquo;s disease (PD). The Parkinson&rsquo;s Disease during the COVID-19 Pandemic (ParCoPa) survey was conducted as an online, nationwide, cross-sectional survey from December 2020 to March 2021 and aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic on the medical care of PD patients from the physicians&rsquo; perspective. Invitations containing a randomly generated registration code were mailed to healthcare professionals from sixty-seven specialty centers in Germany. Confounders for the worsening of subjective treatment quality, perceived health risk due to the profession, and adequate protective measures against SARS-CoV-2 were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Of all forty physicians who responded, 87.5% reported a worsening of motor and nonmotor symptoms in their patients, 97.5% experienced cancellation of appointments, and difficulties in organizing advanced and supplementary therapies were reported by over 95%. Participants offered alternative consultation options, mostly in the form of telephone (77.5%) or online (64.1%) consultations, but telephone consultations were the most accepted by patients (&ldquo;broadly accepted&rdquo;, 40.0%). We identified pandemic-related deficits in providing care for patients with PD and areas of improvement to ensure continued care for this vulnerable patient population

    Changes in cognitive functioning after COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    With an increasing number of individuals recovering from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, there is an urgent need to study the medium- and long-term consequences of the disease. Growing evidence suggests that some patients exhibit symptoms such as fatigue, “brain fog,” or cognitive complaints after the acute infection stage, commonly referred to as “Long COVID.”1 A 6-month study using multidimensional data from the medical records of 73,435 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients showed that, after the first 30 days of illness, individuals have an increased risk of death, higher health resource utilization, and an increased burden from neurocognitive disorders.1 Indeed, evidence from previous epidemics shows that subsequent neurological and, particularly, cognitive complications can occur, such as in the severe influenza epidemic from 1918 to 1921 (also known as the Spanish flu).2 More recently, cases of encephalitis, sensory impairment, coma, and severe neurological damage were reported during the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak in 20123 and vascular or inflammatory damage of the brain and central nervous system in people affected by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) outbreak in 2003.4 Cognitive dysfunction has a significant impact on functionality and quality of life.5 Given the high incidence of COVID-19 and the associated economic, health, and social burden of the epidemic, studying its occurrence and underlying mechanisms is crucial. In the current systematic review, we assess whether there is an increased occurrence of cognitive deficits in adult patients with COVID-19 who previously had no cognitive impairment

    Acute and post-acute neurological manifestations of COVID-19: present findings, critical appraisal, and future directions

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    Acute and post-acute neurological symptoms, signs and diagnoses have been documented in an increasing number of patients infected by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this review, we aimed to summarize the current literature addressing neurological events following SARS-CoV-2 infection, discuss limitations in the existing literature and suggest future directions that would strengthen our understanding of the neurological sequelae of COVID-19. The presence of neurological manifestations (symptoms, signs or diagnoses) both at the onset or during SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with a more severe disease, as demonstrated by a longer hospital stay, higher in-hospital death rate or the continued presence of sequelae at discharge. Although biological mechanisms have been postulated for these findings, evidence-based data are still lacking to clearly define the incidence, range of characteristics and outcomes of these manifestations, particularly in non-hospitalized patients. In addition, data from low- and middle-income countries are scarce, leading to uncertainties in the measure of neurological findings of COVID-19, with reference to geography, ethnicity, socio-cultural settings, and health care arrangements. As a consequence, at present a specific phenotype that would specify a post-COVID (or long-COVID) neurological syndrome has not yet been identified.Fil: Beghi, Ettore. Istituto Di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri; ItaliaFil: Giussani, Giorgia. Istituto Di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri; ItaliaFil: Westenberg, Erica. Universitat Technical Zu Munich; AlemaniaFil: Allegri, Ricardo Francisco. Fundación para la Lucha contra las Enfermedades Neurológicas de la Infancia. Instituto de Neurociencias - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Ciudad Universitaria. Instituto de Neurociencias; ArgentinaFil: Garcia-Azorin, David. Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid; EspañaFil: Guekht, Alla. Moscow Research and Clinical Center for Neuropsychiatry ; Rusia. Russian National Research Medical University; RusiaFil: Frontera, Jennifer. University of New York; Estados UnidosFil: Kivipelto, Miia. Karolinska Huddinge Hospital. Karolinska Institutet; Suecia. Imperial College London; Reino UnidoFil: Mangialasche, Francesca. Karolinska Huddinge Hospital. Karolinska Institutet; SueciaFil: Mukaetova Ladinska, Elizabeta B.. University of Leicester; Reino UnidoFil: Prasad, Kameshwar. Rajendra Medical College Ranchi; IndiaFil: Chowdhary, Neerja. Organizacion Mundial de la Salud; ArgentinaFil: Winkler, Andrea Sylvia. Universitat Technical Zu Munich; Alemania. University of Oslo; Norueg

    Neurological Events Reported after COVID-19 Vaccines: An Analysis of Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System

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    Objective To identify the rates of neurological events following administration of mRNA (Pfizer, Moderna) or adenovirus vector (Janssen) vaccines in the U.S. Methods We used publicly available data from the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) collected between January 1, 2021 and June 14, 2021. All free text symptoms that were reported within 42 days of vaccine administration were manually reviewed and grouped into 36 individual neurological diagnostic categories. Post-vaccination neurological event rates were compared between vaccine types and to age-matched baseline incidence rates in the U.S. and rates of neurological events following COVID. Results Of 306,907,697 COVID vaccine doses administered during the study timeframe, 314,610 (0.1%) people reported any adverse event and 105,214 (0.03%) reported neurological adverse events in a median of 1 day (IQR0-3) from inoculation. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS), and cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) occurred in fewer than 1 per 1,000,000 doses. Significantly more neurological adverse events were reported following Janssen (Ad26.COV2.S) vaccination compared to either Pfizer-BioNtech (BNT162b2) or Moderna (mRNA-1,273; 0.15% vs 0.03% vs 0.03% of doses, respectively, p = 1.5-fold higher than background rates. However, the rate of neurological events after acute SARS-CoV-2 infection was up to 617-fold higher than after COVID vaccination. Interpretation Reports of serious neurological events following COVID vaccination are rare. GBS, CVT and seizure may occur at higher than background rates following Janssen vaccination. Despite this, rates of neurological complications following acute SARS-CoV-2 infection are up to 617-fold higher than after COVID vaccination. ANN NEUROL 202
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