47,108 research outputs found

    The Structure and Function of Mind in Behaviorism

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    The cognitive organization of music knowledge: a clinical analysis

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    Despite much recent interest in the clinical neuroscience of music processing, the cognitive organization of music as a domain of non-verbal knowledge has been little studied. Here we addressed this issue systematically in two expert musicians with clinical diagnoses of semantic dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, in comparison with a control group of healthy expert musicians. In a series of neuropsychological experiments, we investigated associative knowledge of musical compositions (musical objects), musical emotions, musical instruments (musical sources) and music notation (musical symbols). These aspects of music knowledge were assessed in relation to musical perceptual abilities and extra-musical neuropsychological functions. The patient with semantic dementia showed relatively preserved recognition of musical compositions and musical symbols despite severely impaired recognition of musical emotions and musical instruments from sound. In contrast, the patient with Alzheimer’s disease showed impaired recognition of compositions, with somewhat better recognition of composer and musical era, and impaired comprehension of musical symbols, but normal recognition of musical emotions and musical instruments from sound. The findings suggest that music knowledge is fractionated, and superordinate musical knowledge is relatively more robust than knowledge of particular music. We propose that music constitutes a distinct domain of non-verbal knowledge but shares certain cognitive organizational features with other brain knowledge systems. Within the domain of music knowledge, dissociable cognitive mechanisms process knowledge derived from physical sources and the knowledge of abstract musical entities

    The Cosmopolitan Tradition: A Noble but Flawed Ideal

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    Book Review of The Cosmopolitan Tradition: A Noble but Flawed Ideal. By Nussbaum Martha C.

    Scalable Successive-Cancellation Hardware Decoder for Polar Codes

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    Polar codes, discovered by Ar{\i}kan, are the first error-correcting codes with an explicit construction to provably achieve channel capacity, asymptotically. However, their error-correction performance at finite lengths tends to be lower than existing capacity-approaching schemes. Using the successive-cancellation algorithm, polar decoders can be designed for very long codes, with low hardware complexity, leveraging the regular structure of such codes. We present an architecture and an implementation of a scalable hardware decoder based on this algorithm. This design is shown to scale to code lengths of up to N = 2^20 on an Altera Stratix IV FPGA, limited almost exclusively by the amount of available SRAM

    Dynamical virial masses of Lyman-break galaxy haloes at z=3

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    We improve on our earlier dynamical estimate of the virial masses of the haloes of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at redshift z=3 by accounting for the effects of seeing, slit width, and observational uncertainties. From an analysis of the small number of available rotation curves for LBGs we determine a relation Vc7=(1.9+/-0.2)sigma between circular velocity at a radius of 7kpc, and central line velocity width. We use this relation to transform the measured velocity widths of 32 LBGs to the distribution of circular velocities, for the population of LBGs brighter than R=25.5. We compare this distribution against the predicted distribution for the 'massive-halo' model in which LBGs pinpoint all of the highest mass dark matter haloes at that epoch. The observed LBG circular velocities are smaller than the predicted circular velocities by a factor >1.4+/-0.15. This is a lower limit as we have ignored any increase of circular velocity caused by baryonic dissipation. The massive-halo model predicts a median halo virial mass of 10^12.3 Msol, and a small spread of circular velocities. Our median estimated dynamical mass is <10^(11.6+/-0.3) Msol, which is significantly smaller; furthermore, the spread of our circular velocities is much larger than the massive-halo prediction. These results are consistent with a picture which leaves some of the most-massive haloes available for occupation by other populations which do not meet the LBG selection criteria. The median halo mass recently estimated by Adelberger et al. from the measured clustering of LBGs is 10^(11.86+/-0.3) Msol. Our dynamical analysis appears to favour lower masses and to be more in line with the median mass predicted by the collisional starburst model of Somerville et al., of 10^11.3 Msol. [abridged]Comment: 6 pages, 5 figures, MNRAS Letters, Accepte
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