27 research outputs found

    The Forward Physics Facility at the High-Luminosity LHC

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    Maximum likelihood reconstruction of water Cherenkov events with deep generative neural networks

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    Large water Cherenkov detectors have shaped our current knowledge of neutrino physics and nucleon decay, and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. These highly capable detectors allow for directional and topological, as well as calorimetric information to be extracted from signals on their photosensors. The current state-of-the-art approach to water Cherenkov reconstruction relies on maximum-likelihood estimation, with several simplifying assumptions employed to make the problem tractable. In this paper, we describe neural networks that produce probability density functions for the signals at each photosensor, given a set of inputs that characterizes a particle in the detector. The neural networks we propose allow for likelihood-based approaches to event reconstruction with significantly fewer assumptions compared to traditional methods, and are thus expected to improve on the current performance of water Cherenkov detectors.Large water Cherenkov detectors have shaped our current knowledge of neutrino physics and nucleon decay, and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. These highly capable detectors allow for directional and topological, as well as calorimetric information to be extracted from signals on their photosensors. The current state-of-the-art approach to water Cherenkov reconstruction relies on maximum-likelihood estimation, with several simplifying assumptions employed to make the problem tractable. In this paper, we describe neural networks that produce probability density functions for the signals at each photosensor, given a set of inputs that characterizes a particle in the detector. The neural networks we propose allow for likelihood-based approaches to event reconstruction with significantly fewer assumptions compared to traditional methods, and are thus expected to improve on the current performance of water Cherenkov detectors

    A Novel Algorithm to Reconstruct Events in a Water Cherenkov Detector

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    We have developed a novel approach to reconstruct events detected by a water-based Cherenkov detector such as Super- and Hyper-Kamiokande using an innovative deep learning algorithm. The algorithm is based on a generative neural network whose parameters are obtained by minimizing a loss function. In the training process with simulated single-particle events, the generative neural network is given the particle identification (ID) or type, 3d-momentum (p), and 3d-vertex position (V) as the inputs for each training event. Then the network generates a Cherenkov event that is compared with the corresponding true simulated event. Once the training is done, for the given Cherenkov event the algorithm will provide the best estimate on ID, p, and V by minimizing the loss function between the given event and the generated event over ranges of input values of ID, p and V. The algorithm serves as a type of fast simulation for a water Cherenkov detector with a fewer number of assumptions than traditional reconstruction methods. We will show some of the algorithm's excellent performance in addition of the architecture and principle of the network

    Low energy radioactivity BG model in Super-Kamiokande detector from SK-IV data

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    Follow-up of GWTC-2 gravitational wave events with neutrinos from the Super-Kamiokande detector

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    The Forward Physics Facility at the High-Luminosity LHC

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    International audienceHigh energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce a large number of particles along the beam collision axis, outside of the acceptance of existing LHC experiments. The proposed Forward Physics Facility (FPF), to be located several hundred meters from the ATLAS interaction point and shielded by concrete and rock, will host a suite of experiments to probe Standard Model (SM) processes and search for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). In this report, we review the status of the civil engineering plans and the experiments to explore the diverse physics signals that can be uniquely probed in the forward region. FPF experiments will be sensitive to a broad range of BSM physics through searches for new particle scattering or decay signatures and deviations from SM expectations in high statistics analyses with TeV neutrinos in this low-background environment. High statistics neutrino detection will also provide valuable data for fundamental topics in perturbative and non-perturbative QCD and in weak interactions. Experiments at the FPF will enable synergies between forward particle production at the LHC and astroparticle physics to be exploited. We report here on these physics topics, on infrastructure, detector, and simulation studies, and on future directions to realize the FPF's physics potential

    The Forward Physics Facility at the High-Luminosity LHC

    No full text
    High energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce a large number of particles along the beam collision axis, outside of the acceptance of existing LHC experiments. The proposed Forward Physics Facility (FPF), to be located several hundred meters from the ATLAS interaction point and shielded by concrete and rock, will host a suite of experiments to probe standard model (SM) processes and search for physics beyond the standard model (BSM). In this report, we review the status of the civil engineering plans and the experiments to explore the diverse physics signals that can be uniquely probed in the forward region. FPF experiments will be sensitive to a broad range of BSM physics through searches for new particle scattering or decay signatures and deviations from SM expectations in high statistics analyses with TeV neutrinos in this low-background environment. High statistics neutrino detection will also provide valuable data for fundamental topics in perturbative and non-perturbative QCD and in weak interactions. Experiments at the FPF will enable synergies between forward particle production at the LHC and astroparticle physics to be exploited. We report here on these physics topics, on infrastructure, detector, and simulation studies, and on future directions to realize the FPF's physics potential

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

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    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Near Detector Conceptual Design Report