5 research outputs found

    Avoidance in action: Negative tie closure in balanced triads among pupils over time

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    We study avoidance tie closure in balance triads among pupils in two Dutch secondary schools using stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs). We find that pupils were likely to avoid the friends of those they avoided but not enough evidence is found to either fully accept or refute the idea that pupils disagree with their friends on whom to avoid. Moreover, pupils’ migration background does not seem to influence avoidance tie closure in balanced triads. Results are discussed in terms of their theoretical implications. Based on our findings, we elaborate on the possibility of a singular balance promoting effect rather than multiple distinct ones. Limitations are pointed out and future research suggestions are offered

    Perceived Burden, Focus of Attention, and the Urge to Justify: The Impact of the Number of Screens and Probe Order on the Response Quality of Probing Questions

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    Web probing is a valuable tool to assess the validity and comparability of survey items. It uses different probe types—such as category-selection probes and specific probes—to inquire about different aspects of an item. Previous web probing studies often asked one probe type per item, but research situations exist where it might be preferable to test potentially problematic items with multiple probes. However, the response behavior might be affected by two factors: question order and the visual presentation of probes on one screen versus multiple screens as well as their interaction. In this study, we report evidence from a web experiment that was conducted with 532 respondents from Germany in September 2013. Experimental groups varied by screen number (1 versus 2) and probe order (category-selection probe first versus specific probe first). We assessed the impact of these manipulations on several indicators of response quality, probe answer content, and the respondents’ motivation with logistic regressions and two-way ANOVAs. We reveal that multiple mechanisms push response behavior in this context: perceived response burden, the focus of attention, the need for justification, and verbal context effects. We find that response behavior in the condition with two screens and category-selection probe first outperforms all other experimental conditions. We recommend this implementation in all but one scenario: if the goal is to test an item that includes a key term with a potentially too large lexical scope, we recommend starting with a specific probe but on the same screen as the category-selection probe

    Avoidance in action: Negative tie closure in balanced triads among pupils over time

    No full text
    We study avoidance tie closure in balance triads among pupils in two Dutch secondary schools using stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs). We find that pupils were likely to avoid the friends of those they avoided but not enough evidence is found to either fully accept or refute the idea that pupils disagree with their friends on whom to avoid. Moreover, pupils’ migration background does not seem to influence avoidance tie closure in balanced triads. Results are discussed in terms of their theoretical implications. Based on our findings, we elaborate on the possibility of a singular balance promoting effect rather than multiple distinct ones. Limitations are pointed out and future research suggestions are offered

    Perceived Burden, Focus of Attention, and the Urge to Justify: The Impact of the Number of Screens and Probe Order on the Response Quality of Probing Questions

    No full text
    Web probing is a valuable tool to assess the validity and comparability of survey items. It uses different probe types—such as category-selection probes and specific probes—to inquire about different aspects of an item. Previous web probing studies often asked one probe type per item, but research situations exist where it might be preferable to test potentially problematic items with multiple probes. However, the response behavior might be affected by two factors: question order and the visual presentation of probes on one screen versus multiple screens as well as their interaction. In this study, we report evidence from a web experiment that was conducted with 532 respondents from Germany in September 2013. Experimental groups varied by screen number (1 versus 2) and probe order (category-selection probe first versus specific probe first). We assessed the impact of these manipulations on several indicators of response quality, probe answer content, and the respondents’ motivation with logistic regressions and two-way ANOVAs. We reveal that multiple mechanisms push response behavior in this context: perceived response burden, the focus of attention, the need for justification, and verbal context effects. We find that response behavior in the condition with two screens and category-selection probe first outperforms all other experimental conditions. We recommend this implementation in all but one scenario: if the goal is to test an item that includes a key term with a potentially too large lexical scope, we recommend starting with a specific probe but on the same screen as the category-selection probe

    Open innovation in nascent ventures: Does openness influence the speed of reaching critical milestones?

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    Research on open innovation (OI) has demonstrated the benefits of openness for firm innovation processes, but studies have mostly offered cross-sectional insights on incumbent firms. This study offers a more dynamic perspective on the relevance of OI for nascent ventures. Combining entrepreneurship and OI theories, we argue that it is key for resource-scarce nascent ventures to achieve critical venture-creation milestones. While OI can help these ventures to leverage salient external partnerships, we argue that it affects their speed of reaching these milestones. We test our hypotheses on a longitudinal sample focusing on external collaboration practices of nascent ventures in the renewable energy or information and communications technology industries. Our results show that, while engaging in R&D collaborations slows down nascent ventures’ product development and sustainable profit generation activities, joining industry associations does not have a slow-down effect. Our results complement the OI literature by warning about the downsides of openness for nascent ventures, particularly during the venture creation phase, where speed is a high priority
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