22 research outputs found

    Looking for a Subject - Art Therapy and Assessment in Autism

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    This research makes use of a case study methodology employing discourse analysis. It represents a reflection on the practice of art therapy assessment in a service which provides a diagnosis of children who present with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, that is, with social impairments, communication disorders, developmental delays and behavioural problems. An investigation of art production in assessment and an interest in the institution’s discourses, are pursued through the construction of case reports. Four subjects (children aged 4 years, 5 years 8 months, 7 years 7 months, and 11 years 5 months) are presented in three forms. Firstly as “documentary subjects” through an analysis of the clinic’s documents. Secondly as “ekphrastic subjects” – here the subjects are presented through a description and reproduction of the art work produced in the assessment, and thirdly as “discursive subjects”, presented through an analysis of speech and actions recorded on video. Emphasis has been given to the discursive construction of subjectivity and the relation between subjects and art production. The documentary subjects illustrate a story showing that difference disrupts and families seek a restoration of union through engagement with professionals. This story provides a frame which conditions the art therapy assessment and influences art production. A social and cultural understanding of the art production in the clinic, an interpretation that does not discover signs of pathology in the art work, shows that the art work and its intentionality is jointly produced through negotiations between the child and the therapist. The child is able to use art making to assess the situation and present a propositional self in an iconic form and art production also supports the generation of imaginary situations which enables the child to contest and explore power relations

    Art Therapy Large Group

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    We, the conference organisers, hoped the provision of an Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) for the conference on each of the three days, would give delegates the opportunity to explore, through the use of art, performance and dialogue, their experiences of the conference and the dynamics that arise in a large group. We had run an ATLG at our first art therapy conference (Finding a voice, making your mark: defining art therapy for the 21st century) in 2013, and hoped there might be some continuity between the first and second ATLG, a development of the dialogue of word, performance and image through time

    Thinking about children's art production in assessment settings - developing a more socially oriented hermeneutic-Paper presentation at Conference "Making a Mark"

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    My aim in this brief talk is to open debate on the hermeneutic or interpretative frames that adults use in relation to children’s art production by presenting a small part of a much larger research project concluded in 2011 (Tipple, R. A. 2011). I want to suggest that a hermeneutic that is more socially and culturally orientated might help us in understanding the art production in therapeutic and clinical settings in fresh and helpful ways. As well as helping in appreciating the subjectivity of children who are undergoing assessment, this fresh approach might help us understand our own subjectivity in institutional contexts and how this impacts on the practices we, art therapists, adopt, and the art work that is produced in the presence of the art therapist

    The “Primitive” in Art Therapy

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    Paranoia and Paracosms: Brief Art Therapy with Asperger's Syndrome

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    Art Therapy and Diagnostic Assessment

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    Art therapy is a developing profession worldwide, and one that is recognised in some countries, but by no means all. Furthering the establishment of art therapy will require the discipline to develop a robust research profile, one that shows it to be an effective intervention with a wide range of client populations within health, social, educational and criminal justice systems. This edited volume makes a significant contribution to art therapy's evidence base. It reports on innovative art therapy research and conveys, in an accessible and highly readable way, the lived experience of research by art therapy practitioners. Narratives describe a variety of fascinating projects - from a randomised controlled trial to research-based case studies and clinical research that draws on visual and historical methods - that demonstrate a reflexive loop which moves from practice to research and from research back into practice, showing that research is an exciting, accessible and eminently do-able activity. A collaborative approach between the editor and the contributors informs a series of commentaries about both their research findings in relation to the evidence-base of art therapy with children, adults and people with learning disabilities, and the issues that arise for clinical practices and services at the point of delivery

    Art Therapy with People who have Severe Learning Difficulties

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    Presents new ideas in the theory and practice of art therapy, incorporating them into more established art therapy and pointing to future developments. The book concludes with an examination of the training of art therapists and a look at the future direction of research in the field

    ‘Researching Processes in the Art Therapy Large Group’

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    Long conference paper given to 13th European Arts Therapies Conference: Cultural Landscapes in Arts Therapies: participation, diversity and dialogue
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