26 research outputs found

    Antifogging and Frost-Resisting Polyelectrolyte Coatings Capable of Healing Scratches and Restoring Transparency

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    Polymeric antifogging/frost-resisting coatings are suitable for use on flexible substrates but are vulnerable to accidental scratches and cuts. To solve this problem, we present the fabrication of healable, highly transparent antifogging and frost-resisting polymeric coatings via the layer-by-layer assembly of poly­(ethylenimine) (PEI) and a blend of hyaluronic acid and poly­(acrylic acid) (HA-PAA). Due to their remarkable water-absorbing capability, the highly transparent and flexible (PEI/HA-PAA)*50 coatings show excellent antifogging and frost-resisting capabilities even under aggressive fogging and frosting conditions. Meanwhile, these coatings can conveniently and repeatedly heal scratches and cuts several tens of micrometers deep and wide in the same region upon exposure to water because of the dynamic nature of the PEI/HA-PAA coatings. The healability of the (PEI/HA-PAA)*50 coatings provides a new way to design transparent antifogging/frost-resisting polymeric coatings with high flexibility, enhanced reliability, and extended service life

    Healable and Optically Transparent Polymeric Films Capable of Being Erased on Demand

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    Different from living organisms, artificial materials can only undergo a limited number of damage/healing processes and cannot heal severe damage. As an alternative to solve this problem, we report in this study the fabrication of erasable, optically transparent and healable films by exponential layer-by-layer assembly of poly­(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly­(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The hydrogen-bonded PAA/PEO films are highly transparent, capable of conveniently healing damages and being erased under external stimuli. The PAA/PEO films can heal damages such as scratches and deep cuts for multiple times in the same location by exposure to pH 2.5 water or humid N<sub>2</sub> flow. The healability of the PAA/PEO films originates from the reversibility of the hydrogen bonding interaction between PAA and PEO, and the tendency of films to flow upon adsorption of water. When the damage exceeds the capability of the films to repair, the damaged films can be conveniently erased from substrates to facilitate the replacement of the damaged films with new ones. The combination of healability and erasibility provides a new way to the design of transparent films with enhanced reliability and extended service life

    Energy Harvest from Organics Degradation by Two-Dimensional K<sup>+</sup>‑Intercalated Manganese Oxide

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    Pollution treatment, a problem our world is being deeply puzzled by, has required large amounts of energy during enrichment and degradation. However, some pollutants, for instance organics in wastewater, could offer an energy supply but instead are wasted. Here we report an energy harvesting galvanic cell, built by using a Pt foil as an anode and 2D K<sup>+</sup>-intercalated MnO<sub>2</sub> as a cathode, which combines both dye degradation in wastewater and energy harvesting during the degradation process. Owing to the galvanic effect, this cell could accelerate the degradation rate and indicate the progress of degradation. Different kinds of organics could be degraded and produce energy in this cell with a stable open-circuit voltage (0.45 V). Magnification and imitation of this strategy offer a new chance to harvest waste energy in other exothermic reactions

    Additional file 3 of Endometrial mesenchymal stromal/stem cells improve regeneration of injured endometrium in mice

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    Supplementary Fig. 3 – uncropped scan of Western blots (Fig. 5C). The representative uncropped western blotting images is highlighted with red squares. 1: control side of PBS group; 2: injury side of PBS group; 3: control side of eMSC group; 4: eMSC transplantation side of eMSC grou

    Additional file 2 of Endometrial mesenchymal stromal/stem cells improve regeneration of injured endometrium in mice

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    Supplementary Fig. 2 – uncropped scan of Western blots (Fig. 4F). The representative uncropped western blotting images is highlighted with red squares. 1: control side of PBS group; 2: injury side of PBS group; 3: control side of eMSC group; 4: eMSC transplantation side of eMSC grou

    Quantitative Analysis of T Cell Receptor Complex Interaction Sites Using Genetically Encoded Photo-Cross-Linkers

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    The T cell receptor (TCR)-cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) signaling complex plays an important role in initiation of adaptive immune responses, but weak interactions have obstructed delineation of the individual TCR-CD3 subunit interactions during T cell signaling. Here, we demonstrate that unnatural amino acids (UAA) can be used to photo-cross-link subunits of TCR-CD3 on the cell surface. Incorporating UAA in mammalian cells is usually a low efficiency process. In addition, TCR-CD3 is composed of eight subunits and both TCR and CD3 chains are required for expression on the cell surface. Photo-cross-linking of UAAs for studying protein complexes such as TCR-CD3 is challenging due to the difficulty of transfecting and expressing multisubunit protein complexes in cells combined with the low efficiency of UAA incorporation. Here, we demonstrate that by systematic optimization, we can incorporate UAA in TCR-CD3 with high efficiency. Accordingly, the incorporated UAA can be used for site-specific photo-cross-linking experiments to pinpoint protein interaction sites, as well as to confirm interaction sites identified by X-ray crystallography. We systemically compared two different photo-cross-linkersp-azido-phenylalanine (pAzpa) and H-p-Bz-Phe-OH (pBpa)for their ability to map protein subunit interactions in the 2B4 TCR. pAzpa was found to have higher cross-linking efficiency, indicating that optimization of the selection of the most optimal cross-linker is important for correct identification of protein–protein interactions. This method is therefore suitable for studying interaction sites of large, dynamic heteromeric protein complexes associated with various cellular membrane systems

    Additional file 4 of Endometrial mesenchymal stromal/stem cells improve regeneration of injured endometrium in mice

    No full text
    Supplementary Fig. 4 – uncropped scan of Western blots (Fig. 5E). The representative uncropped western blotting images is highlighted with red squares. 1: control side of PBS group; 2: injury side of PBS group; 3: control side of eMSC group; 4: eMSC transplantation side of eMSC grou

    Additional file 1 of Endometrial mesenchymal stromal/stem cells improve regeneration of injured endometrium in mice

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    Supplementary Fig. 1 – Establishment and efficiency of endometrial injury. (A) Surgical exposure of the left side of mouse uterine horn. (B) Electrocoagulation of endometrium with an electrode for inducing endometrial injury. (C) Representative images showing the efficiency of eMSC (blue) with CM-Dil labeling (red). (D) Representative H&E images showing the morphology of control and injured mouse endometrium. Injured sites were indicated by the arrows
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