1,311 research outputs found

    The formation of arcs in the dynamic spectra of Jovian decameter bursts

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    A model is presented that can account for several features of the dynamic spectral arcs observed at decameter wavelengths by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on Voyagers 1 and 2. It is shown that refraction of an extraordinary mode wave initially excited nearly orthogonal to the local magnetic field is significantly influenced by the local plasma density, being greater the higher the density. It is assumed that the source of the decameter radiation lies along the L = 6 flux tube and that the highest frequencies are produced at the lowest altitudes, where both the plasma density and magnetic field gradients are largest. It is further assumed that the decameter radiation is emitted into a thin conical sheet, consistent with both observation and theory. In the model the emission cone angle of the sheet is chosen to vary with frequency so that it is relatively small at both high and low frequencies, but approximately 80 deg at intermediate frequencies. The resulting emission pattern as seen by a distant observer is shown to resemble the observed arc pattern. The model is compared and contrasted with examples of Voyager radio data

    The Radio Jove Project

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    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove

    Decameter: Wave radio observations of Jupiter during the 1970 apparition

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    Observations of Jupiter's sporadic decameter wavelength radio emissions were obtained between November 1978 and March 1979. A multistation, global network of monitoring instruments were utilized in order to obtain nearly continuous, synoptic observations of the planet. Observations were obtained daily at frequencies of 16.7 and 22.2 MHz using five element Yagi antennas at each end of a two element interferometer

    Central On-Line Data Directory

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    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Central On-Line Data Directory (CODD), which allows the general scientist remote access to information about data sets available not only at NSSDC, but throughout the scientific community, is discussed. A user may search for data set information within CODD by specifying spacecraft name, experiment name, investigator name, and/or keywords. CODD will include information on atmospheric science data sets contained not only within the PCDS, but also within other data sets that are deemed important. Keywords to be used in locating these data sets are currently being formulated. The main type of keyword to be used for categorization of data sets will be discipline related. The primary discipline keyword for PCDS-type data sets would be ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE. A good set of subdiscipline keywords is needed under this discipline to subdivide the data sets. A sheet containing a strawman set of subdiscipline keywords was distributed, and a request was made for the knowledgeable scientists to modify or replace the proposed keywords

    A beaming model of the Io-independent Jovian decameter radiation based on multipole models of the Jovian magnetic field

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    A geometrical model is presented in which the apparent source locations of the Io-independent decameter radiation are computed. The calculations assume that the radiation is produced by stably trapped electrons radiating near the electron gyrofrequency and that the emission is then beamed onto a conical surface. The maximum occurrence probability of noise storms is associated with regions in the Jovian magnetosphere where the axis of the emission cone is most inclined toward the Jovian equatorial plane. The calculations utilize and compare two of the octupole spherical harmonic expansions of the Jovian magnetic field constructed from data accumulated by the fluxgate and vector helium magnetometers on board Pioneer 11

    Latitudinal beaming of Jupiter's low frequency radio emissions

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    By comparing RAE-1 and IMP-6 satellite measurements of Jupiter's radio emission near 1MHz with recent Voyager-1 and 2 observations in the same frequency range, the properties of the low frequency radiation pattern over a 10 deg range of latitudes with respect to the Jovian rotation equator can be studied. These observations, which cover a wider latitudinal range than is possible from the earth, are consistent with many aspects of earlier ground-based measurements used to infer a sharp beaming pattern for the decameter wavelength emissions. Marked, systematic changes are found in the statistical occurrence probability distributions with system 3 central meridian longitude as the jovigraphic latitude of the observer changes over this range. Simultaneous observations by the two Voyager spacecraft suggest that the instantaneous beam width may be no more than a few degrees at times. The new hectometer-wave results can be interpreted in terms of a narrow, curved sheet at a fixed magnetic latitude into which the emission is beamed to escape the planet

    Synoptic observations of Jupiter's radio emissions: Average Statistical properties observed by Voyager

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    Observations of Jupiter's low frequency radio emissions collected over one month intervals before and after each Voyager encounter were analyzed. Compilations of occurrence probability, average power flux density and average sense of circular polarization are presented as a function of central meridian longitude, phase of Io, and frequency. The results are compared with ground based observations. The necessary geometrical conditions are preferred polarization sense for Io-related decametric emission observed by Voyager from above both the dayside and nightside hemispheres are found to be essentially the same as are observed in Earth based studies. On the other hand, there is a clear local time dependence in the Io-independent decametric emission. Io appears to have an influence on average flux density of the emission down to below 2 MHz. The average power flux density spectrum of Jupiter's emission has a broad peak near 9MHz. Integration of the average spectrum over all frequencies gives a total radiated power for an isotropic source of 4 x 10 to the 11th power W

    Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

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    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun-Earth Day events and training to widespread educators and classrooms in order to magnify the reach of Sun-Earth Day. Examples of the technologies will be shown along with an assessment of their effectiveness

    SPASE: Current Uses, Tools, and Plans

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    The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is an international collaboration among Heliophysics (solar and space physics) groups concerned with data acquisition and archiving. Within this community there are a variety of old and new data centers, resident archives, "virtual observatories", etc. acquiring, holding, and distributing data. The main product of the SPASE group is an XML-based SPASE Data Model now in operational use to enable searches for and ultimate acquisition of data of interest to a researcher. The SPASE Data Model defines the content of resource descriptions (metadata). The intent is to describe all SCientifically usable Heliophysics data sets using the Data Model. Another product of the SPASE group, in collaboration with NASA's Virtual Observatories, is a set of tools and services which work with SPASE meta data. This includes Registry Services which can retrieve and render metadata using resource identifiers and facilitate the downloading of the data referenced by the meta data. The SPASE Data Model has also been used as a vocabulary in specialized data models. One example is the Heliophysics Event List Manager (HELM) model. The SPASE Data Model is also being expanded to provide the means for more detailed description of data sets with the aim of enabling more automated ingestion and use of the data through detailed format descriptions. The evolution is based on a number of lessons learned and feedback from our community. Some of the lessons learned are unique to Heliophysics, and some are common to the various data diSCiplines. We will discuss the present state of SPASE usage, the role the SPASE Data Model can play in speCialized data models and how we foresee the development direction in the future

    Voyager spacecraft radio observations of Jupiter: Initial cruise results

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    Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission were detected by the planetary radio astronomy instruments onboard the two Voyager spacecraft. The emission is surprisingly similar in morphology but opposite in polarization to the high-frequency Jovian radio noise that were observed with ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. Several possible explanations for the behavior of the low-frequency emission are examined, but none of them is completely satisfactory
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