2,032 research outputs found

    LHC results and prospects: Beyond Standard Model

    Full text link
    We present the results and prospects for searches beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the LHC by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM has been investigated in various configurations and lower limits are set on the s-particle masses. The searches for other scenarios of physics beyond the SM are also presented and lower limits on the mass scale are derived in a large variety of models (new heavy gauge bosons, extra-dimensions, compositeness or dark matter). The prospects for physics using 300 /fb and 3000 /fb of data at the high luminosity LHC are also shown.Comment: Talk presented at the International Workshop on Future Linear Colliders (LCWS13), Tokyo, Japan, 11-15 November 201

    CMS muon system performance

    Get PDF
    The CMS muon system is taking cosmic data since 2006 and is using them to study the performance of the three different detector technologies and triggers (drift tube, cathode strip chambers and resistive strip chambers). The muon system is described placing emphasis on the software tools that were developped and used to take data and to study, online and offline, the performances of the muon system. The results obtained analyzing up to 300 millions of cosmics acquired with the CMS detector will be described

    Distribution of streaming rates into high-redshift galaxies

    Full text link
    We study the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into high-redshift massive galaxies using three sets of AMR hydro-cosmological simulations. We find that the streams keep a roughly constant accretion rate as they penetrate into the halo centre. The mean accretion rate follows the mass and redshift dependence predicted for haloes by the EPS approximation, dM / dt is proportional to Mvir^{1.25} (1 + z)^{2.5}. The distribution of the accretion rates can well be described by a sum of two Gaussians, the primary corresponding to "smooth inflow" and the secondary to "mergers". The same functional form was already found for the distributions of specific star formation rates in observations. The mass fraction in the smooth component is 60 - 90 %, insensitive to redshift or halo mass. The simulations with strong feedback show clear signs of reaccretion due to recycling of galactic winds. The mean accretion rate for the mergers is a factor 2 - 3 larger than that of the smooth component. The standard deviation of the accretion rate is 0.2 - 0.3 dex, showing no trend with mass or redshift. For the smooth component it is 0.12 - 0.24 dex.Comment: 13 pages, 6 figures, 2 tables, final version accepted for publication in MNRA

    Distribution of streaming rates into high-redshift galaxies

    Get PDF
    We study the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into high-redshift massive galaxies using three sets of AMR hydrocosmological simulations. We find that the streams keep a roughly constant accretion rate as they penetrate into the halo centre. The mean accretion rate follows the mass and redshift dependence predicted for haloes by the EPS approximation, M˙∝Mvir1.25 (1+z)2.5\dot{M} \propto M_{\rm vir}^{1.25} \ (1 + z)^{2.5}. The distribution of the accretion rates can well be described by a sum of two Gaussians, the primary corresponding to ‘smooth inflow' and the secondary to ‘mergers'. The same functional form was already found for the distributions of specific star formation rates in observations. The mass fraction in the smooth component is 60-90 per cent, insensitive to redshift or halo mass. The simulations with strong feedback show clear signs of reaccretion due to recycling of galactic winds. The mean accretion rate for the mergers is a factor 2-3 larger than that of the smooth component. The standard deviation of the merger accretion rate is 0.2-0.3 dex, showing no trend with mass or redshift. For the smooth component it is 0.12-0.24 de

    Nitrogen isotopic ratios in Barnard 1: a consistent study of the N2H+, NH3, CN, HCN and HNC isotopologues

    Full text link
    The 15N isotopologue abundance ratio measured today in different bodies of the solar system is thought to be connected to 15N-fractionation effects that would have occured in the protosolar nebula. The present study aims at putting constraints on the degree of 15N-fractionation that occurs during the prestellar phase, through observations of D, 13C and 15N-substituted isotopologues towards B1b. Both molecules from the nitrogen hydride family, i.e. N2H+ and NH3, and from the nitrile family, i.e. HCN, HNC and CN, are considered in the analysis. As a first step, we model the continuum emission in order to derive the physical structure of the cloud, i.e. gas temperature and H2 density. These parameters are subsequently used as an input in a non-local radiative transfer model to infer the radial abundances profiles of the various molecules. Our modeling shows that all the molecules are affected by depletion onto dust grains, in the region that encompasses the B1-bS and B1-bN cores. While high levels of deuterium fractionation are derived, we conclude that no fractionation occurs in the case of the nitrogen chemistry. Independently of the chemical family, the molecular abundances are consistent with 14N/15N~300, a value representative of the elemental atomic abundances of the parental gas. The inefficiency of the 15N-fractionation effects in the B1b region can be linked to the relatively high gas temperature ~17K which is representative of the innermost part of the cloud. Since this region shows signs of depletion onto dust grains, we can not exclude the possibility that the molecules were previously enriched in 15N, earlier in the B1b history, and that such an enrichment could have been incorporated into the ice mantles. It is thus necessary to repeat this kind of study in colder sources to test such a possibility.Comment: accepted in A&

    Nitrogen isotopic ratios in Barnard 1: a consistent study of the N_2H^+, NH_3, CN, HCN, and HNC isotopologues

    Get PDF
    Context. The ^(15)N isotopologue abundance ratio measured today in different bodies of the solar system is thought to be connected to ^(15)N-fractionation effects that would have occurred in the protosolar nebula. Aims. The present study aims at putting constraints on the degree of 15N-fractionation that occurs during the prestellar phase, through observations of D, ^(13)C, and ^(15)N-substituted isotopologues towards B1b. Molecules both from the nitrogen hydride family, i.e. N2H+, and NH3, and from the nitrile family, i.e. HCN, HNC, and CN, are considered in the analysis. Methods. As a first step, we modelled the continuum emission in order to derive the physical structure of the cloud, i.e. gas temperature and H_2 density. These parameters were subsequently used as input in a non-local radiative transfer model to infer the radial abundance profiles of the various molecules. Results. Our modelling shows that all the molecules are affected by depletion onto dust grains in the region that encompasses the B1-bS and B1-bN cores. While high levels of deuterium fractionation are derived, we conclude that no fractionation occurs in the case of the nitrogen chemistry. Independently of the chemical family, the molecular abundances are consistent with ^(14)N/^(15)N ~ 300, a value representative of the elemental atomic abundances of the parental gas. Conclusions. The inefficiency of the ^(15)N-fractionation effects in the B1b region can be linked to the relatively high gas temperature ~17 K, which is representative of the innermost part of the cloud. Since this region shows signs of depletion onto dust grains, we cannot exclude the possibility that the molecules were previously enriched in ^(15)N, earlier in the B1b history and that such an enrichment could have been incorporated into the ice mantles. It is thus necessary to repeat this kind of study in colder sources to test such a possibility

    Cosmology with one galaxy? -- The ASTRID model and robustness

    Full text link
    Recent work has pointed out the potential existence of a tight relation between the cosmological parameter Ωm\Omega_{\rm m}, at fixed Ωb\Omega_{\rm b}, and the properties of individual galaxies in state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. In this paper, we investigate whether such a relation also holds for galaxies from simulations run with a different code that made use of a distinct subgrid physics: Astrid. We find that also in this case, neural networks are able to infer the value of Ωm\Omega_{\rm m} with a ∌10%\sim10\% precision from the properties of individual galaxies while accounting for astrophysics uncertainties as modeled in CAMELS. This tight relationship is present at all considered redshifts, z≀3z\leq3, and the stellar mass, the stellar metallicity, and the maximum circular velocity are among the most important galaxy properties behind the relation. In order to use this method with real galaxies, one needs to quantify its robustness: the accuracy of the model when tested on galaxies generated by codes different from the one used for training. We quantify the robustness of the models by testing them on galaxies from four different codes: IllustrisTNG, SIMBA, Astrid, and Magneticum. We show that the models perform well on a large fraction of the galaxies, but fail dramatically on a small fraction of them. Removing these outliers significantly improves the accuracy of the models across simulation codes.Comment: 16 pages, 12 figure
    • 

    corecore