3,333 research outputs found

    Histogram comparison as a powerful tool for the search of new physics at LHC. Application to CMSSM

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    We propose a rigorous and effective way to compare experimental and theoretical histograms, incorporating the different sources of statistical and systematic uncertainties. This is a useful tool to extract as much information as possible from the comparison between experimental data with theoretical simulations, optimizing the chances of identifying New Physics at the LHC. We illustrate this by showing how a search in the CMSSM parameter space, using Bayesian techniques, can effectively find the correct values of the CMSSM parameters by comparing histograms of events with multijets + missing transverse momentum displayed in the effective-mass variable. The procedure is in fact very efficient to identify the true supersymmetric model, in the case supersymmetry is really there and accessible to the LHC

    Delineation of management zones using mobile measurements of soil apparent electrical conductivity and multivariate geostatistical techniques

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    Site-specific management promotes the identification and management of areas within the field, which represent subfield regions with homogeneous characteristics (management zones). However, determination of subfield areas is difficult because of the complex combination of factors which could affect crop yield. One possibility to capture yield variability is the use of soil physical properties to define the management zones as they are related to plant available water. With the aim of characterizing the spatial variability of the main soil physical variables and using this information to determine potential management zones, soil samples were taken from 70 locations in a 33-ha field in Badajoz, southwestern Spain. Firstly, accurate spatial distribution maps of the soil attributes were generated by using regression kriging as the most suitable algorithm in which exhaustive secondary information on soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) was incorporated. ECa measurements were carried out with a Veris 3100 operating in both shallow (0–30 cm), ECs, and deep (0–90 cm), ECd,mode. Clay, coarse sand and fine sand were the soil physical properties which exhibited higher correlation with ECa (positively correlated with the finer texture component, clay, and negatively correlated with the coarser ones, coarse and fine sands), particularly with ECs. Thus, this was the secondary variable used to obtain the kriged maps. Later, principal component analysis and fuzzy cluster classification were performed to delineate management zones, resulting in two subfields to be managed separately. This number of subfields was determined using the fuzzy performance index and normalized classification entropy as the way to optimize the classification algorithm

    Role of peptidoglycan recycling enzymes AmpD and AnmK in Acinetobacter baumannii virulence features

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    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important causative agent of hospital acquired infections. In addition to acquired resistance to many currently-available antibiotics, it is intrinsically resistant to fosfomycin. It has previously been shown that AmpD and AnmK contribute to intrinsic fosfomycin resistance in A. baumannii due to their involvement in the peptidoglycan recycling pathway. However, the role that these two enzymes play in the fitness and virulence of A. baumannii has not been studied. The aim of this study was to characterize several virulence-related phenotypic traits in A. baumannii mutants lacking AmpD and AnmK. Specifically, cell morphology, peptidoglycan thickness, membrane permeability, growth under iron-limiting conditions, fitness, resistance to disinfectants and antimicrobial agents, twitching motility and biofilm formation of the mutant strains A. baumannii ATCC 17978 ΔampD::Kan and ΔanmK::Kan were compared to the wild type strain. Our results demonstrate that bacterial growth and fitness of both mutants were compromised, especially in the ΔampD::Kan mutant. In addition, biofilm formation was decreased by up to 69%, whereas twitching movement was reduced by about 80% in both mutants. These results demonstrate that, in addition to increased susceptibility to fosfomycin, alteration of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway affects multiple aspects related to virulence. Inhibition of these enzymes could be explored as a strategy to develop novel treatments for A. baumannii in the future. Furthermore, this study establishes a link between intrinsic fosfomycin resistance mechanisms and bacterial fitness and virulence traits.ML-S was supported by the Sara Borrell Program of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (CD17CIII/00017), and AT was supported by the Garantıa Juvenil Program of the Comunidad ́Autónoma de Madrid (PEJ2018-004820-A -MPY 387/19), is currently supported by a FPU grant (FPU20/03261) and PhD student in Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid, Spain ([email protected]). MM is supported by grants from the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (MP 516/19 and MPY 380/18).S

    Evaluation of vineyard growth under four irrigation regimes using vegetation and soil on-the-go sensors

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    Precision agriculture is a useful tool to assess plant growth and development in vineyards. The present study focused on spatial and temporal analysis of vegetation growth variability, in four irrigation treatments with four replicates. The research was carried out in a vineyard located in the southwest of Spain during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. Two multispectral sensors mounted on an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) were used in the different growing seasons/stages in order to calculate the vineyard normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) was also measured up to 0.8m soil depth using an on-the-go geophysical sensor. All measured data were analysed by means of principal component analysis (PCA). The spatial and temporal NDVI and ECa variations showed relevant differences between irrigation treatments and climatological conditions

    Recent GRBs observed with the 1.23m CAHA telescope and the status of its upgrade

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    We report on optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) followed up by our collaboration with the 1.23m telescope located at the Calar Alto observatory. The 1.23m telescope is an old facility, currently undergoing upgrades to enable fully autonomous response to GRB alerts. We discuss the current status of the control system upgrade of the 1.23m telescope. The upgrade is being done by the ARAE our group, based on members of IAA (Instituto de Astrofiisica de Andalucia). Currently the ARAE group is responsible to develop the BOOTES network of robotic telescopes based on the Remote Telescope System, 2nd Version (RTS2), which controls the available instruments and interacts with the EPICS database of Calar Alto. Currently the telescope can run fully autonomously or under observer supervision using RTS2. The fast reaction response mode for GRB reaction (typically with response times below 3 minutes from the GRB onset) still needs some development and testing. The telescope is usually operated in legacy interactive mode, with periods of supervised autonomous runs under RTS2. We show the preliminary results of several GRBs followed up with observer intervention during the testing phase of the 1.23m control software upgrade.Comment: 15 pages, 7 figures. Accepted for publication in the Special issue "Robotic Astronomy" of Advances in Astronomy. It includes two iterations with the referee

    Study of hard double-parton scattering in four-jet events in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

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    Journal of High Energy Physics 2016.11 (2016): 110 reproduced by permission of Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA)Artículo escrito por muchos autores, sólo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración y los autores que firman como pertenecientes a la UAMInclusive four-jet events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-ofmass energy of √ s = 7 TeV are analysed for the presence of hard double-parton scattering using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.3 pb−1 , collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The contribution of hard double-parton scattering to the production of four-jet events is extracted using an artificial neural network, assuming that hard double-parton scattering can be approximated by an uncorrelated overlaying of dijet events. For events containing at least four jets with transverse momentum pT ≥ 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| ≤ 4.4, and at least one having pT ≥ 42.5 GeV, the contribution of hard double-parton scattering is estimated to be fDPS = 0.092 +0.005 −0.011 (stat.) +0.033 −0.037 (syst.). After combining this measurement with those of the inclusive dijet and four-jet cross-sections in the appropriate phase space regions, the effective cross-section, σeff, was determined to be σeff = 14.9 +1.2 −1.0 (stat.) +5.1 −3.8 (syst.) mb. This result is consistent within the quoted uncertainties with previous measurements of σeff, performed at centre-of-mass energies between 63 GeV and 8 TeV using various final states, and it corresponds to 21+7 −6% of the total inelastic cross-section measured at √ s = 7 TeV. The distributions of the observables sensitive to the contribution of hard double-parton scattering, corrected for detector effects, are also providedWe acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azerbaijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF and DNSRC, Denmark; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DSM/IRFU, France; GNSF, Georgia; BMBF, HGF, and MPG, Germany; GSRT, Greece; RGC, Hong Kong SAR, China; ISF, I-CORE and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; FOM and NWO, Netherlands; RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Romania; MES of Russia and NRC KI, Russian Federation; JINR; MESTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZS, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SERI, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; MOST, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States of America. In addition, individual groups and members have received support from BCKDF, the Canada Council, CANARIE, CRC, Compute Canada, FQRNT, and the Ontario Innovation Trust, Canada; EPLANET, ERC, FP7, Horizon 2020 and Marie Sklodowska- Curie Actions, European Union; Investissements d’Avenir Labex and Idex, ANR, Région Auvergne and Fondation Partager le Savoir, France; DFG and AvH Foundation, Germany; Herakleitos, Thales and Aristeia programmes cofinanced by EU-ESF and the Greek NSRF; BSF, GIF and Minerva, Israel; BRF, Norway; Generalitat de Catalunya, Generalitat Valenciana, Spain; the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdo

    Search for Higgs and Z Boson Decays to J/ψγ and ϒ(nS)γ with the ATLAS Detector

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    Artículo escrito por muchos autores, sólo se referencian el primero, los autores que firman como Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y el grupo de colaboración en el caso de que aparezca en el artículoA search for the decays of the Higgs and Z bosons to J/ψγ and ϒ(nS)γ (n=1,2,3) is performed with pp collision data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 20.3 fb-1 collected at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed above expected backgrounds and 95% C.L. upper limits are placed on the branching fractions. In the J/ψγ final state the limits are 1.5×10-3 and 2.6×10-6 for the Higgs and Z boson decays, respectively, while in the ϒ(1S,2S,3S)γ final states the limits are (1.3,1.9,1.3)×10-3 and (3.4,6.5,5.4)×10-6, respectivelyWe acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azerbaijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF, DNSRC and Lundbeck Foundation, Denmark; EPLANET, ERC and NSRF, European Union; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DSM/ IRFU, France; GNSF, Georgia; BMBF, DFG, HGF, MPG and AvH Foundation, Germany; GSRT and NSRF, Greece; ISF, MINERVA, GIF, I-CORE and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; FOM and NWO, Netherlands; BRF and RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; GRICES and FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Romania; MES of Russia and ROSATOM, Russian Federation; JINR; MSTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZŠ, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SER, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; NSC, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, the Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States of Americ
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