167 research outputs found

    Clinical molecular genetics in the UK c.1975-c.2000

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    seminar transcriptChaired by Professor Martin Bobrow and introduced by Professor Bob Williamson, this Witness Seminar included geneticists from a broad range of research and clinical specialities. Discussions of molecular research into haemoglobin disorders, and the development of probes for related genes in the 1970s, included particular acknowledgment of Southern blotting as a critical tool for such research. Also noted was a landmark conference in Crete in 1978 that emphasized the special significance of research work on thalassaemia, as well as providing fruitful networking opportunities for scientists from around the world. Similarly, in 1982, a key course at Leiden University introduced molecular techniques to geneticists from across Europe. In that same year the first prenatal diagnosis by chorionic villus sampling was published, and the emotional aspects of such genetic diagnoses for patients, families and clinicians were frequently discussed during the seminar. Other issues, including the funding of research, and especially the role of patient support groups; the establishment and growth of professional interest groups and bodies such as the Clinical Molecular Genetics Society; and the development of national genetics

    British Contributions to Medical Research and Education in Africa after the Second World War

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    ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2001. First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2001. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 June 1999. Introduction by Dr Maureen Malowany.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 June 1999. Introduction by Dr Maureen Malowany.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 June 1999. Introduction by Dr Maureen Malowany.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 3 June 1999. Introduction by Dr Maureen Malowany.Differences in health services, research and medical education between British East and West Africa over the period to 1980, including the effects of the transition to independent states, were discussed by witnesses with an extraordinary wealth of diverse talent and experience, directed by the chairman, Professor David Bradley. The increased postwar influence of the Medical Research Council in the tropics was described, aided by a seat on the Colonial Medical Research Committee and its successor body, the MRC-based Tropical Medicine Research Board. Research outcomes of programmes in non-infectious diseases and nutrition, along with the great vector-borne diseases, including sleeping sickness and malaria, and helminth eradication spread through the tropics and also influenced treatment in the UK. The importance of Africa for the postwar development of drug treatments for tropical diseases was underlined. Witnesses include: Dr Murray Baker, Sir Christopher Booth, Dr Christopher Draper, Professor Alan Fleming, Professor Herbert Gilles, Dr Len Goodwin, Professor Ralph Hendrickse, Dr Tom Hopwood, the late Professor Michael Hutt, Professor Sir Ian McGregor, Professor George Nelson, Professor Eldryd Parry, Professor Gerry Shaper, Professor John Waterlow, and Dr Roger Whitehead. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2001) British contributions to medical research and education in Africa after the second world war, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 10, London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Cholesterol, Atherosclerosis and Coronary Disease in the UK, 1950–2000.

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2006. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2006. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 8 March 2005. Introduction by Dr Nick Myant, Hammersmith Hospital, London.Cholesterol began to be accepted after the Second World War as a significant cause of atherosclerosis and associated conditions such as coronary heart disease (CHD). This Witness Seminar, chaired by Professor Michael Oliver, included a discussion of the basic research on cholesterol. Early epidemiological studies demonstrated the relationship between excess saturated fat consumption and elevated levels of cholesterol, although cholesterol alone did not explain all population differences. Work on lipoprotein metabolism pointed to hypercholesterolaemia as one of, if not the major, risk factors for CHD, culminating in the development of cholesterol-lowering drugs, particularly the successful statins, available in the UK from the 1980s, and confirmed by randomized controlled trials. The role of diet in heart disease had always been controversial in the UK, and although extreme diets could reduce cholesterol, patient conformity remains difficult. Later, recommended limits on the composition of dietary fat were agreed, assisted by the food industry's introduction of functional foods such as cholesterol-lowering margarine. An introduction by Dr Nick Myant and appendices, on the diet-heart hypothesis by Professor Gerry Shaper and the development of lovastatin by Dr Jonathan Tobert, compliment the transcript. Contributors include Professor David Barker, Professor John Betteridge, Professor Gustav Born, Professor Richard Bruckdorfer, Professor George Davey Smith, Professor Paul Durrington, Professor David Galton, Dr Arthur Hollman, Professor Steve Humphries Professor Gordon Lowe, Professor Vincent Marks, Dr Paul Miller, Professor Jerry Morris, Professor Chris Packard, Professor Stuart Pocock, Professor Kalevi Pyörälä, Professor Thomas Sanders, Professor James Scott, Dr Elspeth Smith, Professor Anne Soutar, Professor Gilbert Thompson, Professor Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe, Professor Neville Woolf and Professor John S Yudkin. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2006) Cholesterol, atherosclerosis and coronary disease in the UK, 1950–2000, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 27. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Childhood asthma and beyond

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    Consists of the edited transcripts of Witness Seminars organized by the History of Twentieth Century Medicine Group and held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London, on 4 April 2000.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2001. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2001. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Consists of the edited transcripts of Witness Seminars organized by the History of Twentieth Century Medicine Group and held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    The Development of Sports Medicine in Twentieth-century Britain

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 29 June 2007. Introduction by Dr John Lloyd Parry, Institute of Sports and Exercise Medicine. First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2009. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2009. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 29 June 2007. Introduction by Dr John Lloyd Parry, Institute of Sports and Exercise Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 29 June 2007. Introduction by Dr John Lloyd Parry, Institute of Sports and Exercise Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 29 June 2007. Introduction by Dr John Lloyd Parry, Institute of Sports and Exercise Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 29 June 2007. Introduction by Dr John Lloyd Parry, Institute of Sports and Exercise Medicine.Sports medicine has grown in importance and visibility in recent years, yet as a discipline it struggled to gain broad recognition within the medical profession from c.1952 until specialty status was granted in 2005. It has also been neglected by historians: we have little beyond the image of a coach with his ‘magic sponge’ as a cure for all injuries, although the late twentieth-century picture is of new specialists developing high-tech interventions for elite athletes. This Witness Seminar arose from the Wellcome Trust-funded project on ‘Sport and Medicine in Britain, 1920–2000’ at the University of Manchester and examined the establishment of a recognizably modern specialty. Chaired by Professor Domhnall MacAuley, topics addressed included the importance of the 1948 London Olympics; the first 4-minute mile; training and altitude physiology; the postwar institutionalization of sports medicine; the relationship between the different main bodies involved in sport and their aims; the changing practice of professionals including physiotherapists, etc.; the relationship of NHS and private sports medicine practitioners and insurance companies; and the key debates within the sports medicine community over the period. Contributors include: Sir Roger Bannister, Dr Malcolm Bottomley, Dr Ian Burney, Professor John Elfed Davies, Professor Charles Galasko, Dr Robin Harland, Dr Vanessa Heggie, Mr Barry Hill, Professor Michael Hobsley, Dr Michael Hutson, Professor Monty Losowsky, Professor Domhnall Macauley (chair), Mrs Rose Macdonald, Professor Donald Macleod, Professor Moira O’Brien, Dr Malcolm Read, Professor Peter Sperryn, Professor Harry Thomason, Dr Dan Tunstall Pedoe and Mrs Sally Williams. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2009) The development of sports medicine in twentieth century Britain. Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 36. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL. ISBN 978 085484 1219The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Early Development of Total Hip Replacement

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone. First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2007. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2007. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 14 March 2006. Introduction by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone,Total hip replacement effectively began in the UK in 1938 and has led to widely used, commercially successful, mass-produced devices that relieve pain for an ever increasing period. The Witness Seminar, chaired by Mr Alan Lettin, discussed the remarkable postwar collaboration of British surgeons, engineers and manufacturing firms in the development of efficient alloys, surgical procedures, instruments and the implementation of clean, bacteria-reduced air in enclosed operating theatres, as illustrated by successful prostheses and techniques developed in Norwich (Kenneth McKee), Wrightington (Sir John Charnley), Stanmore (John Scales), Redhill (Peter Ring), and Exeter (Robin Ling and Clive Lee). Early failures - such as loosening from infection, osteolysis, and wear debris - stimulated the search for improved materials and fixation methods, as well as the addition of antibiotics to bone cement to reduce infection. National hip registers that record the survival of different implants were adopted in Europe in the 1970s (2003 in the UK), and they pinpoint the successful devices, as measured by survival and low rates of revision. An introduction to the volume by Dr Francis Neary and Professor John Pickstone, and appendices on materials by Professor Alan Swanson; on international standards by Mr Victor Wheble; and of details of selected prosthesis supplement the transcript. Contributors include: Lady Charnley, the late Mr Harry Craven, Mr Graham Deane, Professor Duncan Dowson, Mr Reg Elson, Dr Alex Faulkner, Professor Michael Freeman, Mrs Phyllis Hampson, Mr Kevin Hardinge, Mr Mike Heywood-Waddington, Mr John Kirkup, Mr Krishna (Ravi) Kunzru, Miss Betty Lee, Mr Alan Lettin (chair), Mr John Older, Mr John Read, Mr Peter Ring, Mr Ian Stephen, Mr Malcolm Swann, Professor Alan Swanson, Sir Rodney Sweetnam, Mr Keith Tucker, Mr Victor Wheble and Professor Michael Wroblewski. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2007) Early development of total hip replacement, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 29. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Clinical Pharmacology in the UK, c.1950-2000: Industry and Regulation

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2008. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2008.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 September 2007. Introduction by Professor Parveen Kumar, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London.Clinical pharmacology in the UK in the 1950s and 1960s was an exciting profession. Many important new drugs were developed and brought to market and a more systematic knowledge of drug effects in humans was needed, as well as ensuring the safety and efficacy of new and existing drugs, especially following the unexpected problems arising from the use of thalidomide. This Witness Seminar followed an earlier meeting on the history of the general development of clinical pharmacology and focuses on the development of clinical pharmacology in pharmaceutical companies and drug regulation. Professor Rod Flower chaired the meeting of clinical pharmacologists and others who shaped the discipline, which discussed the main centres of influence; the attraction to clinical pharmacologists of working in industry; whether the decline in the number of academic clinical pharmacologists was paralleled in drug companies; what drove drug regulation; and the relationships between companies and regulatory authorities. Participants included Dr Jeffrey Aronson, Professor Nigel Baber, Sir Alasdair Breckenridge, Sir Iain Chalmers, Professor Joe Collier, Professor Donald Davies, Dr Peter Fletcher, Dr Arthur Fowle, Professor Sir Charles George, Professor David Grahame-Smith, Professor John Griffin, Dr Andrew Herxheimer, Professor Ray Hill, Dr Peter Lewis, Dr Tim Mant, Professor Denis McDevitt, Professor Michael Orme, Dr Anthony Peck, Professor Brian Prichard, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins, Professor John Reid, Professor Philip Routledge, Dr Julian Shelley, Dr Robert Smith, Professor Cameron Swift, Professor Tilli Tansey, Dr Duncan Vere, and the late Professor Owen Wade. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2008) Clinical pharmacology in the UK, c. 1950–2000: Industry and regulation. Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 34. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust, which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Clinical Pharmacology in the UK, c.1950-2000: Influences and Institutions

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    Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2008.©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2008.All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 6 February 2007. Introduction by Dr Mark Walport, The Wellcome Trust.The history of clinical pharmacology in the UK over the last half of the twentieth century is largely untold. Many important new drugs were developed and brought to market in the 1950s and 1960s ensuring the need for more systematic knowledge of drug effects in humans and also providing new career opportunities in teaching, research and practice. The 30th anniversary of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology in 2004 and the 75th anniversary of the British Pharmacological Society in 2006 had prompted reflections from practicing clinical pharmacologists. It was timely, therefore, to bring together clinical pharmacologists and others who have shaped the discipline, to promote historical analysis and debate. Chaired by Professor Rod Flower, the meeting considered such questions as: What was/is clinical pharmacology? Which were the main centres of influence? Who and what were the main drivers? Who became clinical pharmacologists and why? What was the significance of specialized societies, meetings and journals? Participants included Dr Stuart Anderson, Dr Jeffrey Aronson, Professor David Barnett, Dr Linda Beeley, Professor Sir James Black, Professor Morris Brown, Professor Mark Caulfield, Sir Iain Chalmers, Professor Donald Davies, Professor Robin Ferner, Dr Arthur Fowle, Professor Sir Charles George, Professor David Gordon, Professor David Grahame-Smith, Dr Andrew Herxheimer, Dr Kenneth Hunter, Professor Trevor Jones, Professor Desmond Laurence, Professor Denis McDevitt, Professor Walter Nimmo, Professor Michael Orme, Dr Anthony Peck, Professor Laurie Prescott, Professor Brian Prichard, Professor John Reid, Professor James Ritter, Professor Philip Routledge, Professor Tilli Tansey, Professor Geoffrey Tucker, Professor Patrick Vallance, Professor Duncan Vere, the late Professor Owen Wade, Professor David Webb and Professor Frank Woods. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2008) Clinical pharmacology in the UK, c. 1950–2000: Influences and institutions. Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 33. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome a registered charity, no. 210183

    The Recent History of Platelets in Thrombosis and Other Disorders

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    The transcript of a Witness Seminar held by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, London, on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2005. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2005. All volumes freely available following the links to publications and Wellcome Witnesses at www.ucl.ac.uk/histmed.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003. Introduction by Professor Tom Meade, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.The recent history of research on platelets and its applications in medicine started with the introduction of ex vivo methods for studying platelet behaviour. The Witness Seminar held on 25 November 2003, chaired by Professor Tom Meade, considered the detailed study of platelets starting with the recognition of their role in haemostasis, both in thrombotic and bleeding disorders . Professor Gustav Born described his research and the invention and development of the optical aggregometer that bears his name. Other topics included the biochemistry and function of platelets ; the platelet release reaction and the effect of aspirin on it ; the Nobel Prize-winning discovery by Sir John Vane of how aspirin inhibits the natural production of prostaglandins; and results of randomized controlled trials of aspirin and other thrombolytic drugs for the prevention of thrombotic conditions. An appendix includes a discussion of the streptokinase trials, 1986-96, from the unpublished Witness Seminar meeting on Thrombolysis held on 28 January 2003, chaired by Professor Brian Pentecost. Participants : Dr Y S [Mick] Bakhle, Sir Christopher Booth, Professor Donald Chambers, Professor John Dickinson, Professor Peter Elwood, Professor Rod Flower, Professor Alison Goodall, Professor John Hampton, Professor Michael Harrison, Professor Stan Heptinstall, Dr Peter Hunter, Dr Peter MacCallum, Dr Marty Mahaut-Smith, Professor Salvador Moncada, Professor Michael Oliver, Professor Clive Page, Professor Sir Stanley Peart, Professor Colin Prentice, Professor Peter Richardson, Dr Stewart Sage, and Dr Duncan Thomas; and from Thrombolysis, Dr Hewan Dewar, the late Sir Richard Doll, Professor John Hampton, Dr Arthur Hollman, Professor Desmond Julian, Dr Robin Norris, Professor Tom Quinn, Dr Roger Smith, and Professor Andrew Stevens. Reynolds L A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2005) The Recent history of platelets in thrombosis and other disorders, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 23. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL is funded by the Wellcome Trust,which is a registered charity, no. 210183

    Cystic Fibrosis

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    First published by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, 2004. ©The Trustee of the Wellcome Trust, London, 2004. All volumes are freely available online at: www.history.qmul.ac.uk/research/modbiomed/wellcome_witnesses/Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.Annotated and edited transcript of a Witness Seminar held on 11 June 2002. Introduction by Professor John Dodge.In the 1930s, when cystic fibrosis (CF) was first clearly recognised, it was a disorder that inevitably led to death in early childhood from respiratory failure and malnutrition. Since that time, antibiotic treatment and improving nutrition have brought increasing hope to sufferers from the disorder, so that increasing numbers of children have lived on into adult life. Chaired by Professor John Walker-Smith, and attended by a group of leading experts in field at the time, this transcript discusses the history and development of treatment as a result of the establishment of multidisciplinary teams working at special CF centres. Participants also discussed the role of the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and the identification in 1989 of the defective gene, which made antenatal diagnosis possible and suggests that gene therapy might become feasible in the future. Christie D A, Tansey E M. (eds) (2004) Cystic fibrosis, Wellcome Witnesses to Twentieth Century Medicine, vol. 20. London: The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL.The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at University College London is funded by the Wellcome Trust,which is a registered charity, no. 210183
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