23 research outputs found

    Non-universal Z' from SO(10) GUTs with vector-like family and the origin of neutrino masses

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    A ZZ' gauge boson with mass around the (few) TeV scale is a popular example of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) and can be a fascinating remnant of a Grand Unified Theory (GUT). Recently, ZZ' models with non-universal couplings to the SM fermions due to extra vector-like states have received attention as potential explanations of the present RKR_K, RKR_{K^{\ast}} anomalies; this includes GUT model proposals based on the SO(10)\mathrm{SO}(10) group. In this paper we further develop GUT models with a flavour non-universal low scale ZZ' and clarify several outstanding issues within them. First, we successfully incorporate a realistic neutrino sector (with linear and/or inverse low scale seesaw mechanism), which was so far a missing ingredient. Second, we investigate in detail their compatibility with the RKR_K, RKR_{K^{\ast}} anomalies; we find that the anomalies do not have a consistent explanation within such models. Third, we demonstrate that these models have other compelling phenomenological features; we study the correlations between the flavour violating processes of μ3e\mu\to 3e and μ\mu-ee conversion in a muonic atom, showing how a GUT imprint could manifest itself in experiments.Comment: Revised version, published in NPB. New material, general conclusions unchanged. 30 pages, 4 figures, 2 table

    Comparatively Light Extra Higgs States as Signature of SUSY SO(10)\mathrm{SO}(10) GUTs with 3rd Family Yukawa Unification

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    We study 33rd family Yukawa unification in the context of supersymmetric (SUSY) SO(10)\mathrm{SO}(10) GUTs and SO(10)\mathrm{SO}(10)-motivated boundary conditions for the SUSY-breaking soft terms. We consider μ<0\mu<0 such that the SUSY loop-threshold effects enable a good fit to all third family masses of the charged Standard Model (SM) fermions. We find that fitting the third family masses together with the mass of the SM-like Higgs particle, the scenario predicts the masses of the superpartner particles and of the extra Higgs states of the MSSM: while the sparticles are predicted to be comparatively heavy (above the present LHC bound but within reach of future colliders), the spectrum has the characteristic feature that the lightest new particles are the extra MSSM Higgses. We show that this effect is rather robust with respect to many deformations of the GUT boundary conditions, but turns out to be sensitive to the exactness of top-bottom Yukawa unification. Nevertheless, with moderate deviations of a few percent from exact top-bottom Yukawa unification (stemming e.g.\ from GUT-threshold corrections or higher-dimensional operators), the scenario still predicts extra MSSM Higgs particles with masses not much above 1.5TeV1.5\,\mathrm{TeV}, which could be tested e.g.\ by future LHC searches for ditau decays H0/A0ττH^0/A^{0}\to\tau\tau. Finding the extra MSSM Higges before the other new MSSM particles could thus be a smoking gun for a Yukawa unified SO(10)\mathrm{SO}(10) GUT.Comment: 39 pages, 13 figures, 1 table, 2 appendice

    Employing nucleon decay as a fingerprint of SUSY GUT models using SusyTCProton

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    While the observation of nucleon decay would be a smoking gun of Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) in general, the ratios between the decay rates of the various channels carry rich information about the specific GUT model realization. To investigate this fingerprint of GUT models in the context of supersymmetric (SUSY) GUTs, we present the software tool SusyTCProton, which is an extension of the module SusyTC to be used with the REAP package. It allows to calculate nucleon decay rates from the relevant dimension five GUT operators specified at the GUT scale, including the full loop-dressing at the SUSY scale. As an application, we investigate the fingerprints of two example GUT toy models with different flavor structures, performing an MCMC analysis to include the experimental uncertainties for the charged fermion masses and CKM mixing parameters. While both toy models provide equally good fits to the low energy data, we show how they could be distinguished via their predictions of ratios for nucleon decay rates. Together with SusyTCProton we also make the additional module ProtonDecay public. It can be used independently from REAP and allows to calculate nucleon decay rates from given D = 5 and D = 6 operator coefficients (accepting the required SUSY input for the D = 5 case in SLHA format). The D = 6 functionality can also be used to calculate nucleon decay in non-SUSY GUTs

    Predicting δPMNS\delta^\text{PMNS}, θ23PMNS\theta_{23}^\text{PMNS} and fermion mass ratios from flavour GUTs with CSD2

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    Constrained Sequential neutrino Dominance of type 2 (referred to as CSD2) is an attractive building block for flavour Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) because it predicts a non-zero leptonic mixing angle θ13PMNS\theta_{13}^\text{PMNS}, a deviation of θ23PMNS\theta_{23}^\text{PMNS} from π/4\pi /4, as well as a leptonic Dirac CP phase δPMNS\delta^\text{PMNS} which is directly linked to the CP violation relevant for generating the baryon asymmetry via the leptogenesis mechanism. When embedded into GUT flavour models, these predictions are modified in a specific way, depending on which GUT operators are responsible for generating the entries of fermion Yukawa matrices. In this paper, we systematically investigate and classify the resulting predictions from supersymmetric SU(5)\mathrm{SU}(5) based flavour models by fitting the known fermion mass and mixing data, in order to provide a roadmap for future model building. Interestingly, the promising models predict the lepton Dirac CP phase δPMNS\delta^\mathrm{PMNS} between 230230^\circ and 290290^\circ, and the quark CP phase δCKM\delta^\mathrm{CKM} in accordance with a right-angled unitarity triangle (αUT=90\alpha_\mathrm{UT}=90^\circ). Also, our model setup predicts the quantities θ23PMNS\theta_{23}^\mathrm{PMNS} and md/msm_d/m_s with less uncertainty than current experimental precision, and allowing with future sensitivity to discriminate between them.Comment: 46 pages, 6 figures, 3 tables; we provide neutrino RGE data tables at https://particlesandcosmology.unibas.ch/fileadmin/user_upload/particlesandcosmology-unibas-ch/files/RGrunning.zi

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

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    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Near Detector Conceptual Design Report

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    International audienceThe Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international, world-class experiment aimed at exploring fundamental questions about the universe that are at the forefront of astrophysics and particle physics research. DUNE will study questions pertaining to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of supernovae, the subtleties of neutrino interaction physics, and a number of beyond the Standard Model topics accessible in a powerful neutrino beam. A critical component of the DUNE physics program involves the study of changes in a powerful beam of neutrinos, i.e., neutrino oscillations, as the neutrinos propagate a long distance. The experiment consists of a near detector, sited close to the source of the beam, and a far detector, sited along the beam at a large distance. This document, the DUNE Near Detector Conceptual Design Report (CDR), describes the design of the DUNE near detector and the science program that drives the design and technology choices. The goals and requirements underlying the design, along with projected performance are given. It serves as a starting point for a more detailed design that will be described in future documents

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU