36 research outputs found

    Ultra-Fast Hadronic Calorimetry

    Full text link
    Calorimeters for particle physics experiments with integration time of a few ns will substantially improve the capability of the experiment to resolve event pileup and to reject backgrounds. In this paper the time development of hadronic showers induced by 30 and 60 GeV positive pions and 120 GeV protons is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and beam tests with a prototype of a sampling steel-scintillator hadronic calorimeter. In the beam tests, scintillator signals induced by hadronic showers in steel are sampled with a period of 0.2 ns and precisely time-aligned in order to study the average signal waveform at various locations with respect to the beam particle impact. Simulations of the same setup are performed using the MARS15 code. Both simulation and test beam results suggest that energy deposition in steel calorimeters develop over a time shorter than 2 ns providing opportunity for ultra-fast calorimetry. Simulation results for an "ideal" calorimeter consisting exclusively of bulk tungsten or copper are presented to establish the lower limit of the signal integration window.Comment: 10 pages, 16 figures, accepted for publication in NIM

    Muon stopping power and range tables 10 MeV-100 TeV

    Get PDF
    The mean stopping power for high-energy muons in matter can be described by −dE/dx = a(E) + b(E)E, where a(E) is the electronic stopping power and b(E) is the energy-scaled con-tribution from radiative processes—bremsstrahlung, pair production, and photonuclear interac-tions. a(E) and b(E) are both slowly-varying functions of the muon energy E where radiative effects are important. Tables of these stopping power contributions and continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) ranges (which neglect multiple scattering and range straggling) are given for a selection of elements, compounds, mixtures, and biological materials for incident kinetic en-ergies in the range 10 MeV to 100 TeV. Tables of the contributions to b(E) are given for the same materials

    Radiation Shielding Analysis for the PIP-II Linac at Fermilab

    Full text link
    The Proton Improvement Plan-II (PIP-II) [1] has been developed at Fermilab to provide powerful proton beams to the laboratorys experiments. An 800-MeV superconducting linear accelerator-a centerpiece of the project-is currently under construction in Batavia, Illinois (USA). After completion, the superconducting linac will be the starting point for the 1.2 MW (Phase 1) and 2.4-MW (Phase 2) proton beam that is needed for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab [2]. Due to unavoidable loss of a fraction of the beam in the accelerator components, a certain level of radiation will be generated in the accelerator tunnel both during normal operation and at accidents. This work deals with radiation shielding design for the accelerator facility

    ILCRoot Tracker and Vertex Detector Hits Response to MARS15 Simulated Backgrounds in the Muon Collider

    Get PDF
    Abstract Results from a simulation of the background for a muon collider, and the hits response of a silicon tracking detector to this backgroundare presented.The backgroundcausedbydecaysofthe750 GeV/ c beam μ + and μ − was simulated using the MARS15 program, which included the infrastructure of the beam line elements near the detector and the 10 ∘ nozzles that shield the detector from this background. The ILCRoot framework, along with the Geant4 program, was used to simulate the hits response of the tracker and vertex silicon detectors to the muon-decay background remaining after the shielding nozzles. Results include the hit distributions in these detectors, the fractions of type-specific background particles producing these hits and illustrate the use of timing of the hits to suppress the muon beam background

    Preliminary Report on the Study of Beam-Induced Background Effects at a Muon Collider

    Full text link
    Physics at a multi-TeV muon collider needs a change of perspective for the detector design due to the large amount of background induced by muon beam decays. Preliminary studies, based on simulated data, on the composition and the characteristics of the particles originated from the muon decays and reaching the detectors are presented here. The reconstruction performance of the physics processes HbbˉH\to b\bar b and ZbbˉZ\to b\bar b has been investigated for the time being without the effect of the machine induced background. A preliminary study of the environment hazard due to the radiation induced by neutrino interactions with the matter is presented using the FLUKA simulation program

    Code intercomparison and benchmark for muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by an 18-GeV electron beam after massive iron shielding

    Full text link
    In 1974, Nelson, Kase, and Svenson published an experimental investigation on muon shielding using the SLAC high energy LINAC. They measured muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by a 18 GeV electron beam hitting a copper/water beam dump and attenuated in a thick steel shielding. In their paper, they compared the results with the theoretical mode ls available at the time. In order to compare their experimental results with present model calculations, we use the modern transport Monte Carlo codes MARS15, FLUKA2011 and GEANT4 to model the experimental setup and run simulations. The results will then be compared between the codes, and with the SLAC data.Comment: 10 pp. Presented paper at the 12th Workshop on Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities, SATIF-12, Fermilab, April 28-30, 201

    The Case for a Muon Collider Higgs Factory

    Full text link
    We propose the construction of a compact Muon Collider Higgs Factory. Such a machine can produce up to \sim 14,000 at 8\times 10^{31} cm^-2 sec^-1 clean Higgs events per year, enabling the most precise possible measurement of the mass, width and Higgs-Yukawa coupling constants.Comment: Supporting letter for the document: "Muon Collider Higgs Factory for Smowmass 2013", A White Paper submitted to the 2013 U.S. Community Summer Study of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society, Y. Alexahin, et. al, FERMILAB-CONF-13-245-T (July, 2013
    corecore