5 research outputs found

    Can't read my broker face?—Tracing a motif and metaphor of expert knowledge through audiovisual images of the financial crisis

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    Based on the question of the representability of economy and economics in audiovisual media, developments on the financial markets have often been discussed as a depiction problem. The abstractness and complexity of economic interrelations seem to defy classical modes of storytelling and dramatization. Nevertheless, public opinion about economic changes and dependencies crucially relies on audiovisual media. But how can the public communicate in images, sounds, and words about forces that are out of sight and out of reach, and can supposedly only be adequately grasped by experts? In a case study on audiovisual images of the global financial crisis (2007–), this paper tracks and analyzes a recurring motif: the staging of expert knowledge as close-ups of expressive faces vis-à-vis computer screens in television news, documentaries, as well as feature films. It draws on the use of digital tools for corpus exploration (reverse image search) and the visualization of video annotations. By relating and comparing different staging strategies by which these “broker faces” become embodiments of turbulent market dynamics, the paper proposes to not regard them as repeated instantiations of the same metaphor, but as a developing web of cinematic metaphors. Different perspectives (news of market developments or historical accounts of crisis developments) and affective stances toward the global financial crisis are expressed in these variations of the face-screen constellation. The paper thus presents a selection of different appearances of “broker faces” as a medium for an audiovisual discourse of the global financial crisis. A concluding analysis of a scene from Margin Call focuses on its specific intertwining of expert and screen as an ambivalent movement figuration of staging insight. Between the feeling of discovery (of a potential future threat) and the sense of being haunted (by a menacing force), the film stages the emergence of a “broker face” in an atmospheric tension between suspense and melancholy. We argue that the film thereby reframes the motif and poses questions of agency, temporality, and expert knowledge

    Instrumental genesis through interdisciplinary collaboration -- reflections on the emergence of a visualisation framework for video annotation data

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    Instrumental genesis through interdisciplinary collaboration-reflections on the emergence of a visualisation framework for video annotation data XML This paper presents, discusses and reflects on the development of a visualization framework for the analysis of the temporal dynamics of audiovisual expressivity. The main focus lies on the instrumental genesis process (Rabardel 1995; Longchamp 2012)-a concept trying to express and analyze the co-evolution of instruments and the practices they make possible-underlying this development. It is described through the collaboration and communication processes between computer science scholars and humanities scholars in finding new ways of visualizing complex datasets for exploration and presentation in the realm of film-studies research. It draws on the outcome and concrete usage of the visualizations in publications and presentations of a research group, the AdAproject, that investigates the audiovisual rhetorics of affect in audiovisual media on the financial crisis (2007-). These film analyses are based on theoretical assumptions on the process of film-viewing, the relation of the viewer's perception and the temporally unfolding audiovisual images, and a methodical approach that draws on 'steps' in the research process such as segmentation, description and qualification, called eMAEX (Kappelhoff et al. 2011-2016) to reconstruct these experiential figurations (Bakels et al. 2020a, 2020b). The main focus of this paper is the process of iterative development of visualizations as interactive interfaces generated with the open-source software Advene, that were an integral part of the research process. In this regard, the timeline visualization is not only of interest for visual argumentation in (digital) humanities publications, but also for the creation of annotations as well as the exploration of this data. In the first part of the paper we describe this interdisciplinary collaboration as instrumental genesis on a general level-as an evolving and iterative process. In the second part we focus on the specific challenge of designing a visualization framework for the temporal dynamics of audiovisual aesthetics. Lastly we zoom out by reflecting on experiences and insights that might be of interest for the wider digital humanities community

    Collaboration, Preservation and Sustainability in Digital Humanities: a question of time

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    This paper discusses interdisciplinary collaborative practices based on the AdA project (meaning “Affektrhetoriken des Audiovisuellen” https://projectada.github.io/) in which institutionally situated research groups from computational sciences and film studies developed approaches for the analysis of the temporal dynamics of audiovisual expressivity by bringing together a theoretically informed methodology of film analysis and computational video analysis and semantic video annotation. In an earlier publication, we already presented how co-building a Digital Humanities tool could be seen as instrumental genesis. In it we concentrated on the iterative development of a visualisation framework to highlight the need for a common language and for the consideration of time needed for collaboration.We would like to pursue the reflection on the instrumental genesis (Rabardel, 1995) of collaboration tools along the time dimension. We saw that every step of tool development for such qualitative and exploratory research requires time: may it be for tool sketching, development, testing, or documenting its usage for manual annotation.

    Instrumental genesis through interdisciplinary collaboration – reflections on the emergence of a visualisation framework for video annotation data

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    International audienceInstrumental genesis through interdisciplinary collaboration-reflections on the emergence of a visualisation framework for video annotation data XML This paper presents, discusses and reflects on the development of a visualization framework for the analysis of the temporal dynamics of audiovisual expressivity. The main focus lies on the instrumental genesis process (Rabardel 1995; Longchamp 2012)-a concept trying to express and analyze the co-evolution of instruments and the practices they make possible-underlying this development. It is described through the collaboration and communication processes between computer science scholars and humanities scholars in finding new ways of visualizing complex datasets for exploration and presentation in the realm of film-studies research. It draws on the outcome and concrete usage of the visualizations in publications and presentations of a research group, the AdAproject, that investigates the audiovisual rhetorics of affect in audiovisual media on the financial crisis (2007-). These film analyses are based on theoretical assumptions on the process of film-viewing, the relation of the viewer's perception and the temporally unfolding audiovisual images, and a methodical approach that draws on 'steps' in the research process such as segmentation, description and qualification, called eMAEX (Kappelhoff et al. 2011-2016) to reconstruct these experiential figurations (Bakels et al. 2020a, 2020b). The main focus of this paper is the process of iterative development of visualizations as interactive interfaces generated with the open-source software Advene, that were an integral part of the research process. In this regard, the timeline visualization is not only of interest for visual argumentation in (digital) humanities publications, but also for the creation of annotations as well as the exploration of this data. In the first part of the paper we describe this interdisciplinary collaboration as instrumental genesis on a general level-as an evolving and iterative process. In the second part we focus on the specific challenge of designing a visualization framework for the temporal dynamics of audiovisual aesthetics. Lastly we zoom out by reflecting on experiences and insights that might be of interest for the wider digital humanities community

    Between Data Mining and Human Experience – Digital Approaches to Film, Television and Video Game Analysis

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    Abstract of paper 0537 presented at the Digital Humanities Conference 2019 (DH2019), Utrecht , the Netherlands 9-12 July, 2019
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