2,853 research outputs found

    Endocrine therapy: defining the path of least resistance

    Get PDF
    One of the best-characterized oncogenic mechanisms in breast cancer is the aberrant activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, protein kinase B, and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. In both endocrine-resistant disease and breast cancer stem cells, this is commonly caused by specific genetic lesions or amplification of key pathway components or both. These observations have generated two interesting hypotheses. Firstly, do these genetic anomalies provide clinically significant biomarkers predictive of endocrine resistance? Secondly, do tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells emerge from a stem-like cell population? New studies, published in Breast Cancer Research, raise the possibility that these hypotheses are intrinsically linked

    THE CONCEPT OF THE RENAISSANCE IN MODERN HISTORICAL FICTION

    Get PDF

    Effects of Type 1 Diabetes on the Mechanoreflex in Rats

    Get PDF
    Mechanical allodynia is present as early as four days post streptozotocin (STZ) injection in type 1 diabetic (T1DM) rats. This is thought to occur through mechanisms affecting the same thin fiber afferents that evoke the mechanoreflex. PURPOSE: In this study, we attempted to determine the effects of T1DM on the mechanoreflex. METHODS: We injected (i.p.) 50 mg/kg of Streptozotocin (STZ) or the vehicle (CTL) in either sex Sprague Dawley rat and waited 1 week (STZ: BW=258±31 g, glucose=448±88 mg/dL, HbA1C=6.4±1.0%; CTL: BW=318±54 g, glucose=175±48 mg/dL, HbA1C=4.3±0.2%). On the day of experiment, the right jugular vein and both carotid arteries were cannulated to inject fluids and to measure blood pressure and heart rate, respectively. The rat was placed in a Kopf stereotaxic frame and spinal unit to perform a precollicular decerebration that allowed for termination of anesthesia. The musculature of the left hindlimb was exposed and the Achilles tendon was attached to a force transducer. The tendon was then stretched for 30 seconds using a rack and pinion and the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses were measured. RESULTS: We found that the pressor (STZ: ΔMAP=42.11±8 mmHg, n=9; CTL: ΔMAP=18.67±4 mmHg, n=6; p=0.02) but not the cardioaccelerator (STZ: ΔHR=13.67±3 bpm, n=9; CTL: ΔHR=9.67±2 bpm, n=6; p=0.22) responses to tendon stretch were exaggerated 1 week after injecting STZ. Both diabetic and control rats developed similar tensions with tendon stretch. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the mechanoreflex is augmented in T1DM rats. Further studies are needed to identify the mechanisms involved in this augmentation

    Line tension and structure of smectic liquid crystal multilayers at the air-water interface

    Full text link
    At the air/water interface, 4,-8-alkyl[1,1,-biphenyl]-4-carbonitrile (8CB) domains with different thicknesses coexist in the same Langmuir film, as multiple bilayers on a monolayer. The edge dislocation at the domain boundary leads to line tension, which determines the domain shape and dynamics. By observing the domain relaxation process starting from small distortions, we find that the line tension is linearly dependent on the thickness difference between the coexisting phases in the film. Comparisons with theoretical treatments in the literature suggest that the edge dislocation at the boundary locates near the center of the film, which means that the 8CB multilayers are almost symmetric with respect to the air/water interface.Comment: 21 pages, 6 figure

    Foraging theory provides a useful framework for livestock predation management

    Get PDF
    A societal shift toward plant dominant diets and a reduction in livestock rearing could have broad social, environmental and conservation benefits. Livestock husbandry, however, has a wealthy cultural history, strong support and high consumer demand. It is therefore likely to continue as a major land use and conservation issue for predators. From a producer’s perspective, the primary goals of livestock protection are maximising, or at least maintaining, production by minimising losses and mitigating detriment to stock welfare. Lethal removal of predators remains a commonplace solution. Such management measures are questionable as they raise animal welfare and conservation concerns, risk inhibiting ecological processes, are often expensive, and in some circumstances, exacerbate livestock predation problems. Non-lethal alternatives can facilitate co-existence between livestock farmers and predators, ideally reducing the ecological impact of pastoralism and achieving conservation goals. The need for rigorous study of non-lethal approaches has however been recently highlighted. Tools and methods involved in livestock protection, as well as the theoretical basis of how we perceive and manage the problem, require deeper consideration. Non-lethal approaches require knowledgeable implementation and an effective decision making system is a prerequisite for successful practice. Livestock predation and its prevention are fundamentally influenced by the underlying principles of foraging ecology and risk theory. We propose that manipulating elements of Brown’s (1988) quitting harvest rate model provides a useful conceptual framework for reducing livestock predation and encouraging coexistence.http://www.elsevier.de/jnc2020-06-01hj2019Centre for Wildlife Managemen

    Nurses\u27 Alumnae Association Bulletin, June 1970

    Get PDF
    Alumnae President\u27s Message Congratulations Alumni Association Portrait of Samuel D. Gross Officers and Chairmen of Committees Financial Report Progress of Jefferson 1969-1970 School of Nursing Annual Report School of Practical Nursing Report Emergency Department Patient Services Department Annual Luncheon Pictures Committee Reports Progress of the Alumnae Association Crossword Puzzle Missing Graduates Resume of Alumnae Meetings Minutes Class News Student Nurses Section Crossword Puzzle Answers Notice

    Nurses\u27 Alumnae Association Bulletin, June 1969

    Get PDF
    Alumnae President\u27s Message Officers and Chairmen Financial Report Progressive Changes at Jefferson School of Nursing Report Student Activities School of Practical Nursing Report Jefferson Expansion Report Clerk-Typist Report Committee Reports Resume of Alumnae Meetings Class News 1969 CLINIC Correspondence Notice

    Documenting Nursing and Medical Students’ Stereotypes about Hispanic and American Indian Patients

    Full text link
    Objective: Hispanic Americans and American Indians face significant health disparities compared with White Americans. Research suggests that stereotyping of minority patients by members of the medical community is an important antecedent of race and ethnicity-based health disparities. This work has primarily focused on physicians’ perceptions, however, and little research has examined the stereotypes healthcare personnel associate with Hispanic and American Indian patients. The present study assesses: 1) the health-related stereotypes both nursing and medical students hold about Hispanic and American Indian patients, and 2) nursing and medical students’ motivation to treat Hispanic and American Indian patients in an unbiased manner. Design: Participants completed a questionnaire assessing their awareness of stereotypes that healthcare professionals associate with Hispanic and American Indian patients then completed measures of their motivation to treat Hispanics and American Indians in an unbiased manner. Results: Despite being highly motivated to treat Hispanic and American Indian individuals fairly, the majority of participants reported awareness of stereotypes associating these patient groups with noncompliance, risky health behavior, and difficulty understanding and/or communicating health-related information. Conclusion: This research provides direct evidence for negative health-related stereotypes associated with two understudied minority patient groups—Hispanics and American Indians—among both nursing and medical personnel
    • …
    corecore