1,069 research outputs found

    Priming: a tool for imaging

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    News and comment section

    Zoning in on music and the brain

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    Meeting report on a one-day symposium, The Musical Brain, held at The Royal Institution, London, UK, on 12 July 2002

    Circumventing Congress\u27s Comprehensive Schemes: The Third Circuit Allows Employees of Educational Institutions to Bypass Title VII and Bring Claims Under Title IX in \u3cem\u3eDoe v. Mercy Catholic Medical Center\u3c/em\u3e

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    Five of the U.S. Courts of Appeals are currently split as to whether employees bringing claims of sex-based employment discrimination are able to use either Title VII or Title IX of the Civil Rights Act as avenues of relief where both statutes are concurrently applicable. On March 3, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Doe v. Mercy Catholic Medical Center, became the most recent circuit to address this issue. Joining the First and Fourth Circuits, the Third Circuit held that the concurrent applicability of Title VII and Title IX did not preclude the plaintiff employee’s private causes of action under Title IX. This Comment argues that by ignoring Title VII’s administrative remedial schemes, the Third Circuit improperly circumvented congressionally imposed structures to make Title VII the primary avenue of relief for claims of employment discrimination

    Universal dyslexia?

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    In 'News and comment' sectio

    Probing perceptual asynchrony

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    In 'News and comment' section. A review of Nishida, S. and Johnston, A. (2002) Marker correspondence, not processing latency, determines temporal binding of visual attributes. Curr. Biol. (in press

    Lost in music

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    Listening to music is effortless and highly rewarding for most of us. But people with congenital amusia have life-long difficulties in this regard – they don’t recognise tunes that would be familiar to the rest of us and they can’t tell one song from another. This article explores why music is so impenetrable to these people and explains how such individuals offer a unique window on to the typical development of the musical brain

    Circumventing Congress\u27s Comprehensive Schemes: The Third Circuit Allows Employees of Educational Institutions to Bypass Title VII and Bring Claims Under Title IX in \u3cem\u3eDoe v. Mercy Catholic Medical Center\u3c/em\u3e

    Get PDF
    Five of the U.S. Courts of Appeals are currently split as to whether employees bringing claims of sex-based employment discrimination are able to use either Title VII or Title IX of the Civil Rights Act as avenues of relief where both statutes are concurrently applicable. On March 3, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Doe v. Mercy Catholic Medical Center, became the most recent circuit to address this issue. Joining the First and Fourth Circuits, the Third Circuit held that the concurrent applicability of Title VII and Title IX did not preclude the plaintiff employee’s private causes of action under Title IX. This Comment argues that by ignoring Title VII’s administrative remedial schemes, the Third Circuit improperly circumvented congressionally imposed structures to make Title VII the primary avenue of relief for claims of employment discrimination

    Congenital amusia

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    Quick guide

    Big Data Discrimination: Maintaining Protection of Individual Privacy Without Disincentivizing Businesses’ Use of Biometric Data to Enhance Security

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    Biometric identification technology is playing an increasingly significant role in the lives of consumers in the United States today. Despite the benefits of increased data security and ease of consumer access to businesses’ services, lack of widespread biometric data regulation creates the potential for commercial misuse. Of particular concern is the use of biometric data by businesses, such as those within the data broker industry, to enable opaque discrimination against consumers. Although some states, such as Illinois, Texas, and Washington, have adopted comprehensive biometric data regulation statutes, the statutes do not offer a consistent approach. This Note argues that Congress should consider enacting a comprehensive statute. The industry-specific approach to privacy regulation of federal law, however, may leave regulation up to the states. Therefore, as more states look to regulate businesses’ collection and use of biometric data, they should enact statutes that seek to balance protecting consumers’ biometric data from discriminatory use and businesses’ use of biometric data to enhance security and provide improved products and services

    Attending and intending

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    In 'News and comment' sectio
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