129 research outputs found

    ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY REFORM: A TAXONOMY OF ECONOMISTS' PERSPECTIVES

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    As the environmental policy recommendations of economists become more acceptable, differences in the professional understanding of, and support for, different policy forms are becoming more apparent. These different approaches to environmental policy and research are described around a taxonomy of four perspectives: "rational analysts," "cost analysts", "market managers," and "free market environmentalists." These perspectives are compared and contrasted. Recognition of these differences can result in a better appreciation of the different research agendas of economists and can improve clarity in teaching and policy advising.Economic incentives, Environmental policy, Regulation, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    The Use and Opportunity of Cooperative Organizational Forms as an Innovative Regulatory Tool Under the Clean Water Act

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    Numerous reforms to introduce financial incentives and flexibility into the Clean Water Act have been proposed. Cooperative organizational forms that consolidate multiple regulated entities under a single organizational umbrella are an overlooked, but potentially useful avenue for reform. In concept, these new organizational forms would function much like a farmer cooperative using coordination and consolidation to lower input costs to its members. Illustrations of how cooperative organizational forms can be used to lower costs and enhance regulatory flexibility in both the water quality and wetland programs are provided.Environmental Economics and Policy,

    NONPOINT SOURCE AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION CREDIT TRADING: WHAT CAN THE TWO LEARN FROM EACH OTHER?

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    Emission trading programs have been discussed with respect to achieving water quality objectives and future caps on carbon emissions. A significant part of this literature explores the institutional and technical design issues associated with trades involving nonpoint effluent sources and carbon sequestration. This paper explores conceptual linkages between the nonpoint and carbon sequestration programs and identifies potential areas where cross fertilization can benefit research and policy design of trading programs for environmental protection.Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    The Contribution of Nonmarket Valuation to Policy: The Case of Nonfederal Hydropower Relicensing

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    The contribution of nonmarket valuation studies to decisions about the operation of nonfederal hydroelectric facilities is examined. Hydropower licensing reforms by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to better weigh market and nonmarket tradeoffs did not require or use nonmarket valuation. License negotiation processes are interpreted as a substitute for valuation.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Groundwater Management in Nebraska: Governing the Commons through Local Resource Districts

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    Environmental Services Programs for the Chesapeake Bay

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    Ecosystem Services, Payment for Ecosystem Services, Water Quality, Chesapeake Bay, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy, Q25, Q28, Q53, Q57,

    An Evaluation of Nutrient Trading Options in Virginia: A Role for Agriculture?

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    Water Quality Trading, offsets, nutrients, agriculture, BMPs, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    Evaluation Framework for Water Quality Trading Programs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

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    Water quality trading programs are being proposed and implemented across the US in a variety of forms and with differing objectives. The programs being proposed and implemented in the Chesapeake Bay region are no exception. Against this background the Chesapeake Bay Program's Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee and the Mid-Atlantic Water Program requested a general framework to inform and guide the evaluation of the performance trading programs. This resulting report was developed by a workgroup comprised of ten individuals with extensive experience in the study, design, and evaluation of trading programs. While the impetus for this report was to improve evaluation of trading programs in the Chesapeake Bay region, the evaluation framework is broad enough to apply to trading programs in general
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