33 research outputs found

    The lichens of forest rocky communities of mountain Olovgora (Arkhangelsk Region, Northwest Russia)

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    The present study reports 223 species and three subspecies of lichens from forest rocky communities of mountain Olovgora, which is the highest point of the Vetreny Poyas ridge (Arkhangelsk Region, NW Russia). A total of 82 species are new for the mainland area of Arkhangelsk Region. The species Bryoria glabra has been reported for the first time for European Russia. Two recorded lichen species, Cladonia bellidiflora and Lobaria pulmonaria, are in the Red Data Book of Arkhangelsk Region. The occurrence of old-growth forests, high heterogeneity of conditions, presence of an altitudinal gradient and the proximity to the sea lead to the rich diversity of lichens in this area.

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Eastern Leningrad Region

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    Thirteen species of lichens and one related fungus are reported as new to the Eastern Leningrad Region. Two of them – Arthonia incarnata and Nephromopsis laureri – are also new to the whole Leningrad Region. One species – Lauderlindsaya acroglypta – is new to North-Western European Russia.

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Leningrad Region, Russia. V

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    Eight species of lichens and seven lichenicolous fungi are reported from the Leningrad Region. Agonimia repleta, Protoparmelia hypotremella and Stereocaulon taeniarum are reported for the first time for Russia; Clypeococcum cetrariae is new to the European Russia; Lepraria nivalis, Merismatium aff. nigritellum (on Physcia aipolia) and Stigmidium leprariae are new to the North-Western European Russia; Cladonia macroceras, C. strepsilis, Endococcus fusiger, Lichenoconium erodens, Lobothallia melanaspis, Niesslia cladoniicola and Skyttella mulleri are new to the Leningrad Region; Sclerophora coniophaea is new to Saint Petersburg. The most noteworthy records are briefly discussed.

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Leningrad Region, Russia. II

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    Thirty species of lichens, one lichenicolous fungus and two non-lichenized fungi are reported from the Leningrad Region (Eastern, Western or Saint-Petersburg). Candelaria pacifica, Lecanora compallens, Monodictys epilepraria and Vezdaea retigera are reported for the first time for Russia, Gregorella humida is new to European Russia, Micarea hedlundii and Strangospora microhaema are new to North-Western European Russia. Arctomia delicatula var. acutior, Coenogonium luteum and Lepraria aff. atlantica are new to the Leningrad Region. Brief discussions on most interesting records are included.

    Some sterile Caloplaca crusts identified by molecular data from the Leningrad region (Russia)

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    Four samples of sterile Caloplaca crusts (Teloschistaceae, lichenized fungi) were determined on the basis of their ITS nrDNA sequences. The samples, collected in NW Russia, mainly from Kotlin Island, Baltic Sea, belong to three species, C. dichroa, C. obscurella and C. phlogina, the first and last species being new to north-western European Russia and to Leningrad region.

    The lichens of forest rocky communities of the hill Muroigora (Arkhangelsk Region, Northwest Russia)

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    The present study reports 188 species and 2 subspecies of lichens and allied fungi from forest rocky communities of the hill Muroigora situated in the Arkhangelsk part of the National park “Vodlozersky” (Arkhangelsk Region, NW Russia). Lepraria ecorticata is new to Russia, and 13 more species are new for the mainland area of the Arkhangelsk Region: Arthonia mediella, Arthonia vinosa, Bacidia igniarii, Bryoria vrangiana, Chaenothecopsis pusiola, Cladonia caespiticia, Lecidea plana, Lepraria borealis, Micarea misella, Pertusaria pustulata, Schaereria cinereorufa, Xanthoparmelia pulla and Xylographa trunciseda. Two lichen species, Bryoria fremontii and Lobaria pulmonaria, are in the Red Data Books of the Arkhangelsk Region and Russian Federation. A total of 89 species are reported as new for the Vodlozersky National Park.

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Leningrad Region, Russia. XII

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    Three lichen species and eight lichenicolous fungi were recorded for the first time for St. Petersburg or Eastern Leningrad Region. In addition, the protected species Lobaria scrobiculata was rediscovered in the Leningrad Region. The lichenicolous fungus Arthonia parietinaria is new to Russia, and two species, Didymocyrtis melanelixiae and Tremella everniae, are new for European Russia

    New records of lichens and allied fungi from the Leningrad Region, Russia

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    Twelve species of lichenized and two lichenicolous fungi, and one non-lichenized calicioid fungus are reported from the Leningrad Region (Eastern, Western or Saint-Petersburg). Lecanora norvegica and Opegrapha lamyi are reported for the first time for Russia. Six taxa are also new to the whole Leningrad Region; four, Lecidella flavosorediata, Ochrolechia bahusiensis, Phaeocalicium praecedens and Tremella lichenicola – to North-Western European Russia, and one, the anamorphic lichen Dictyocatenulata alba is new to European Russia. Brief discussions on the species are included.

    Konevets Island (Leningrad Region, Russia) – a historical refuge of lichen diversity in Lake Ladoga

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    We present an updated checklist for Konevets Island (Leningrad Region, Russia). The revealed lichen biota comprises 435 species, including 378 lichens, 46 lichenicolous fungi and 11 non-lichenized saprobic fungi, of which 31 species (27 lichens and 4 lichenicolous fungi) are known only from collections made by Veli Räsänen (1917, 1938). Acremonium hypholomatis is reported for the first time for Russia; Caloplaca soralifera, Trapelia corticola, and Muellerella lichenicola for Northwestern European Russia; and Bacidia vermifera, Lecanora mughicola, Micarea contexta, Pyrenochaeta xanthoriae, Rhizocarpon disporum, Stigmidium squamariae and Xylographa difformis for Leningrad Region. From lichenological point of view, the most valuable habitats of Konevets Island are old-growth spruce forests. The studied lichen biota is rich and diverse and exceptionally well-preserved in comparison to the mainland part of Karelian Isthmus. It definitely deserves protection

    The lichens of the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia – diversity on the edge of the megapolis

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    We present a lichen checklist for the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland in the limits of St. Petersburg, Russia. This area has diverse lichen biota within the city limits, and has been comprehensively studied since 1893, which gives a good base for analysis of historical changes in lichen diversity. The documented lichen biota comprises 469 species (430 lichenized, 24 lichenicolous, 3 facultatively lichenicolous, and 12 non-lichenized saprobic fungi), of them 191 species are known from herbaria and literature for the period before 1991, and 436 species were recorded since 1991 to 2019. Thirty-three taxa were excluded from the lichen list of the study area as erroneous or dubious records. Altogether 48 species are new to St. Petersburg, including: Lecidea malmeana and Micarea czarnotae – new to Russia; Caloplaca lucifuga, Gyalecta nigricans, Micarea soralifera – new to European Russia; Agonimia flabelliformis, Endococcus verrucosus, Lecania turicensis, Micarea fallax, M. tomentosa, Xanthomendoza huculica – new to Northwestern European Russia; Lichenoconium lichenicola, Ramalina europaea, Sarcogyne hypophaea – not known also from the Leningrad Region. The studied lichen biota is moderately rich compared to other city territories. The history of economic development of the region has caused its serious transformation, degradation of natural habitats and therefore partial loss of lichen diversity. At the same time, human-made substrates and anthropogenic plant communities are inhabited by lichens, including species unknown in the natural habitats of the study area. However, 44 species recorded in the study area are red-listed in St. Petersburg, with 13 of them known only from historical collections. Forest communities, as well as historical parks, in NW part of St. Petersburg are important source of biodiversity on regional level nowadays and hopefully in future, and deserve protection
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