98 research outputs found

    Shock induced endotheliopathy (SHINE) in acute critical illness - a unifying pathophysiologic mechanism

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    The Erratum to this article has been published in Critical Care 2017 21:187 Unfortunately this article [1] was published with an error. The first and last author names are presented incorrectly. The first author name should be Pär Ingemar Johansson, or alternatively Johansson PI. The last author name should be Sisse Rye Ostrowski, or alternatively Ostrowski SR.One quarter of patients suffering from acute critical illness such as severe trauma, sepsis, myocardial infarction (MI) or post cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) develop severe hemostatic aberrations and coagulopathy, which are associated with excess mortality. Despite the different types of injurious “hit”, acutely critically ill patients share several phenotypic features that may be driven by the shock. This response, mounted by the body to various life-threatening conditions, is relatively homogenous and most likely evolutionarily adapted. We propose that shock-induced sympatho-adrenal hyperactivation is a critical driver of endothelial cell and glycocalyx damage (endotheliopathy) in acute critical illness, with the overall aim of ensuring organ perfusion through an injured microvasculature. We have investigated more than 3000 patients suffering from different types of acute critical illness (severe trauma, sepsis, MI and PCAS) and have found a potential unifying pathologic link between sympatho-adrenal hyperactivation, endotheliopathy, and poor outcome. We entitled this proposed disease entity, shock-induced endotheliopathy (SHINE). Here we review the literature and discuss the pathophysiology of SHINE.Peer Reviewe

    Monitoring of dabigatran anticoagulation and its reversal in vitro by thrombelastography.

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    Dabigatran etexilate, a pro-drug of a direct thrombin inhibitor, was approved a few years ago for non-valvular atrial fibrillation and deep venous thrombosis. Rapid monitoring of the dabigatran level is essential in trauma and bleeding patients but the traditional plasma-based assays may not sufficiently display the effect. Furthermore, no antidote exists and reversal of the anticoagulant effect is impossible or difficult. The present study investigated the in vitro effect of dabigatran on whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) and its reversal by recombinant activated factor VII and prothrombin complex concentrate

    Gold micro-particles for knee osteoarthritis

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    BACKGROUND: This exploratory study investigates if intra‐articular injected gold microparticles in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) reduce immunomodulatory‐based pain via proteomic changes in the synovial fluid (SF) and serum. METHODS: Thirty patients with moderate KOA were included. Intraarticular injections with 20 mg gold microparticles (72.000 particles, 20–40 µm in diameter) using the patient's synovial fluid (SF) as carrier were performed. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) subscores for pain, stiffness, and function were assessed at inclusion, 8 weeks and 2 years The PainDetect questionnaire, pain pressure threshold (PPT), temporal summation (TS), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and pain diary were assessed at inclusion and 8 weeks. Proteome analysis was performed on SF and blood samples before and after 8 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: A decrease in WOMAC scores (pain (p = 0.0001), stiffness (p = 0.0088), activity (p = 0.0001)), PainDetect (p = 0.0002) and increase in PPT (p = 0.001) and CPM (p = 0.021) and a decrease in TS (p = 0.03) were found after 8 weeks compared to inclusion assessments. At 2 years follow‐up compared to baseline there was a decrease in WOMAC scores (pain (p = 0.0001), stiffness (p = 0.007), activity (p = 0.0001)) and PainDetect (p = 0.0001). In SF, 28 different proteins were downregulated and 11 upregulated (p < 0.05) mainly associated immune response. Similarly, 31 proteins were downregulated and 1 upregulated in serum (p < 0.05) reflecting key immune response and anatomical structure development processes. No adverse effects related to the treatment were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Gold microparticles injected intra‐articular in KOA joints may provide pain relief and an inflammatory modulatory effect based on proteome changes found in SF and serum. A randomized, controlled, double‐blind study is needed to infer a conclusion. SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicates that intra‐articular gold may provide advantages in clinical practice for managing knee osteoarthritic pain. The use of intraarticular gold can add new knowledge to the treatment of inflammation and pain

    Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis

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    BACKGROUND: The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. RESULTS: 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group; nearly half received both RBCs and plasma) whereas 182 patients only received in-hospital blood products (RBCs, Plasma and Platelets) within 6 hours of admission (IH group). PH patients had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, more penetrating injuries, lower systolic blood pressures, lower hemoglobin levels, lower platelet counts and greater acidosis upon ED admission than the IH group (all p < 0.05). Despite differences in type of injury and admission vitals indicating that the PH group had more signs of bleeding than the IH group, there were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality (PH 26.7% vs. IH 20.9% p = 0.31). When comparing rTEG variables between PH patients transfused with 0, 1 or 2 units of plasma, more pre-hospital plasma transfusion was tendency towards improved rTEG variables. When adjusting for pre-hospital RBC, pre-hospital plasma was associated with significantly higher rTEG MA (p = 0.012) at hospital admission. DISCUSSION: After adjusting for pre-hospital RBCs, pre-hospital plasma transfusion was independently associated with increased rTEG MA, as well as arrival indices of shock and hemodynamic instability. Besides more severe injury and worse clinical presentation, the group that received pre-hospital transfusion had early and late mortality similar to patients not transfused pre-hospital. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that early administration of plasma can provide significant hemostatic and potential survival benefit to severely hemorrhaging trauma patients

    Traumatic Endotheliopathy:A Prospective Observational Study of 424 Severely Injured Patients

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    OBJECTIVE: Investigate and confirm the association between sympathoadrenal activation, endotheliopathy and poor outcome in trauma patients. BACKGROUND: The association between sympathoadrenal activation, endotheliopathy, and poor outcome in trauma has only been demonstrated in smaller patient cohorts and animal models but needs confirmation in a large independent patient cohort. METHODS: Prospective observational study of 424 trauma patients admitted to a level 1 Trauma Center. Admission plasma levels of catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline) and biomarkers reflecting endothelial damage (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, and sE-selectin) were measured and demography, injury type and severity, physiology, treatment, and mortality up till 28 days were recorded. RESULTS: Patients had a median ISS of 17 with 72% suffering from blunt injury. Adrenaline and noradrenaline correlated with syndecan-1 (r = 0.38, P < 0.001 and r = 0.23, P < 0.001, respectively) but adrenaline was the only independent predictor of syndecan-1 by multiple linear regression adjusted for age, injury severity score, Glascow Coma Scale, systolic blood pressure, base excess, platelet count, hemoglobin, prehospital plasma, and prehospital fluids (100 pg/mL higher adrenaline predicted 2.75 ng/mL higher syndecan-1, P < 0.001). By Cox analyses adjusted for age, sex, injury severity score, Glascow Coma Scale, base excess, platelet count and hemoglobin, adrenaline, and syndecan-1 were the only independent predictors of both <24-hours, 7-day and 28-day mortality (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, noradrenaline was an independent predictor of <24-hours mortality and thrombomodulin was an independent predictor of 7-day and 28-day mortality (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed that sympathoadrenal activation was strongly and independently associated with endothelial glycocalyx and cell damage (ie, endotheliopathy) and furthermore that sympathoadrenal activation and endotheliopathy were independent predictors of mortality in trauma patients

    Endothelial Cell Phenotypes Demonstrate Different Metabolic Patterns and Predict Mortality in Trauma Patients

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    Funding Information: HHH has been supported by a PhD-scholarship from Rigshospitalet, Denmark, and would like to thank The Candys Foundation for the grant (2018-279). IMdM and LKN were supported by The Novo Nordisk Foundation (NNF Grant numbers: NNF20CC0035580; NNF14OC0009473; and NNF20SA0066621). Publisher Copyright: © 2023 by the authors.In trauma patients, shock-induced endotheliopathy (SHINE) is associated with a poor prognosis. We have previously identified four metabolic phenotypes in a small cohort of trauma patients (N = 20) and displayed the intracellular metabolic profile of the endothelial cell by integrating quantified plasma metabolomic profiles into a genome-scale metabolic model (iEC-GEM). A retrospective observational study of 99 trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 Trauma Center. Mass spectrometry was conducted on admission samples of plasma metabolites. Quantified metabolites were analyzed by computational network analysis of the iEC-GEM. Four plasma metabolic phenotypes (A–D) were identified, of which phenotype D was associated with an increased injury severity score (p < 0.001); 90% (91.6%) of the patients who died within 72 h possessed this phenotype. The inferred EC metabolic patterns were found to be different between phenotype A and D. Phenotype D was unable to maintain adequate redox homeostasis. We confirm that trauma patients presented four metabolic phenotypes at admission. Phenotype D was associated with increased mortality. Different EC metabolic patterns were identified between phenotypes A and D, and the inability to maintain adequate redox balance may be linked to the high mortality.Peer reviewe

    A proposal for a study on treatment selection and lifestyle recommendations in chronic inflammatory diseases:A danish multidisciplinary collaboration on prognostic factors and personalised medicine

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    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro-inflammatory molecule tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) (i.e., TNF inhibitors). Approximately one-third of the patients do not respond to the treatment. Genetics and lifestyle may affect the treatment results. The aims of this multidisciplinary collaboration are to identify (1) molecular signatures of prognostic value to help tailor treatment decisions to an individual likely to initiate TNF inhibitor therapy, followed by (2) lifestyle factors that support achievement of optimised treatment outcome. This report describes the establishment of a cohort that aims to obtain this information. Clinical data including lifestyle and treatment response and biological specimens (blood, faeces, urine, and, in IBD patients, intestinal biopsies) are sampled prior to and while on TNF inhibitor therapy. Both hypothesis-driven and data-driven analyses will be performed according to pre-specified protocols including pathway analyses resulting from candidate gene expression analyses and global approaches (e.g., metabolomics, metagenomics, proteomics). The final purpose is to improve the lives of patients suffering from CIDs, by providing tools facilitating treatment selection and dietary recommendations likely to improve the clinical outcome
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