51 research outputs found

    Exhibitions and the City: To Accelerate or Pause? Two Asia-Pacific Case Studies

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    Critical historical appraisal of two exhibitions: 'Cities on the Move' (1997–2000) and Project 1, P_A_U_S_E, of the fourth Gwangju Biennale (2002)

    Making Art Global (Part 2): 'Magiciens de la Terre' 1989

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    This book is part of Afterall's Exhibition Histories series. It offers extensive visual representation and critical reappraisal of the famous and infamous 'Magiciens de la Terre', which took place in Paris in 1989. Co-editor of this publication, Lucy Steeds contributes the lead essay, arguing that the show, which was promoted as 'the first worldwide exhibition of contemporary art', may be seen as an inadvertent model for transnational and project-based curating in the ensuing era of neoliberal globalisation

    What comes after ‘global’ exhibition histories?:Art between the ‘planetary’ and the ‘earthly’

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    Emerging from fifteen years working with colleagues around the world on exhibition histories for contemporary art, this essay uses “ecological exposability” as a means of appraising art here and today. In other words, it simply asks: how may public engagement with art situate us in more lively ways, implicating us in the ecosystems wherever we find ourselves, while simultaneously encouraging us to embed within the environment – aesthetically, critically and carefully – on a worldwide horizon? In particular, the exhibition possibilities for a work of art anchored in the West Coast of Scotland is explored, for its translocal and transcontinental resonances

    Project Earth and Art’s Exposability

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    Exhibition Histories and Afrofictions

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    A group exhibition at the Michaelis Galleries, University of Cape Town, 2 July to 18 August 2017, co-curated by Lucy Steeds and Nkule Mabaso

    Exposability: On the Taking-Place in Future of Art

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    Art’s 'exposability' — Walter Benjamin’s word is 'Ausstellbarkeit' — promises both a public future and a social history for art. Or we might rather say: public futures and social histories for artistic practices. In this essay I revisit Ausstellbarkeit as Benjamin invokes it in the 1930s and I repurpose it for art theory now. In doing this, I apply three lenses. First is 'A Woman of Paris' (1923), the film written and directed by Charlie Chaplin and starring Edna Purviance, which is frequently cited by Benjamin and has some intriguing recent history online. Second comes the 'Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism' show at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (1936), and the position of Mickey Mouse in relation. Third and finally, I briefly reflect on the trajectories of two filmic heroines of early Soviet cinema, in 'The Adventures of Oktyabrina' ('Pokhozdeniya Oktyabrini', 1924) and 'Alone' ('Odna', 1931) respectively. In applying these lenses, I explore what it might mean to think through exposability as a heuristic serving sociopolitical ends. This essay contributes to the book 'Theater, Garden, Bestiary: A Materialist History of Exhibitions', edited by Tristan Garcia and Vincent Normand. The volume gathers and expands upon the results of the research project with the same name, led by Garcia and Normand at ECAL/University of Art and Design Lausanne

    Exhibitions [of Drawings] in Britain, 1964–80 / Expositions [de dessin] en Grande-Bretagne, 1964–1980

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    Chapter in the book 'Towards Visibility – Exhibiting Contemporary Drawing – 1964-1980' - a historical study on the legitimation process of drawing in contemporary art and curatorial practices. Alongside texts by Mel Bochner, Hugo Daniel, Thierry Davila, Julie Enckell Julliard, Catherine Macchi, Noor Mertens, and Laurence Schmidlin. Edited by Julie Enckell Julliard. Published with the Musée Jenisch, Vevey

    How Institutions Think: Between Contemporary Art and Curatorial Discourse

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    Taking its title from Mary Douglas's 1986 book, "How Institutions Think", this anthology reconsiders the practices, habits, models and rhetoric of the institution and the anti-institution in contemporary art and curating. Contributors consider the institution as an object of inquiry across many disciplines, including political theory, organizational science and sociology. They reflect upon how institutions inform art, curatorial, educational an research practices as much as they shape the world around us. The first part, "Thinking via Institutions", moves from the particular to the general; the second part, "Thinking about Institutions", considers broader questions about institutional frameworks. The introduction is co-authored by the editors: Paul O'Neill, Lucy Steeds and Mick Wilson. Contributors listed on the back of the book (see image). "How Institutions Think" is the second in a series of three publications, building upon the success of "The Curatorial Conundrum: What to Study? What to Research? What to Practice?" (The MIT Press, 2016)

    Curating After the Global: Roadmaps for the Present

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    Co-edited by Lucy Steeds, the final part in a trilogy of anthologies on curating in relation to contemporary art. Steeds particular contribution is 'Section II: Exhibition Histories', which they open with an introductory text 'Activating What Might Have Happened to Shape What Could Be'. This section gathers contributions by María Berríos & Jakob Jakobsen, Yaiza Hernández Velázquez, Ntone Edjabe & David Morris, Morad Montazami and Grace Samboh. Steeds also contributes an essay: 'Following Projeto Terra'. --- From the publishers website: What it means to be global—or to be local—in the context of artistic, curatorial, and theoretical knowledge and practice. In this volume, an international, interdisciplinary group of writers discuss what it means to be global—or to be local—in the context of artistic, curatorial and theoretical knowledge and practice. Continuing the discussion begun in The Curatorial Conundrum (2016) and How Institutions Think (2017), Curating After the Global considers curating and questions of locality, geopolitical change, the reassertion of nation-states, and the violent diminishing of citizen and denizen rights across the globe. It has become commonplace to talk of a globalized art world and even to speak of contemporary art as a driver of globalization. This universalization of what art is or can be is often presumed to be at the cost of local traditions and any sense of locality and embeddedness. But need this be the case? The contributors to Curating After the Global explore, among other things, specific curatorial projects that may offer roadmaps for the globalized present; new institutional approaches; and ways of thinking, vocabularies, and strategies for moving forward
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