287 research outputs found

    Patient delays in seeking help at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis: the problem, its causes and potential solutions

    Get PDF
    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease for which early treatment is vital to limit long term joint damage. However, people often delay in seeking medical help at the onset of RA symptoms. The early interpretation of symptoms and the process of making sense of symptoms impacts on both help-seeking decision-making and self-management. Furthermore, the general public’s perceptions and knowledge of RA may also affect the way that symptoms are interpreted. Examining the psychology behind early symptom interpretation, the barriers to help-seeking behaviour and investigating the public understandings of RA, can help us understand how decisions are made and guide us in developing interventions which encourage people to seek help promptly at the onset of RA

    An algorithm to identify rheumatoid arthritis in primary care: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink study

    Get PDF
    Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem, inflammatory disorder associated with increased levels of morbidity and mortality. While much research into the condition is conducted in the secondary care setting, routinely collected primary care databases provide an important source of research data. This study aimed to update an algorithm to define RA that was previously developed and validated in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Methods: The original algorithm consisted of two criteria. Individuals meeting at least one were considered to have RA. Criterion 1:≥1 RA Read code and a disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) without an alternative indication. Criterion 2:≥2RA Read codes, with at least one 'strong' code and no alternative diagnoses. Lists of codes for consultations and prescriptions were obtained from the authors of the original algorithm where these were available, or compiled based on the original description and clinical knowledge. 4161 people with a first Read code for RA between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012 were selected from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, successor to the GPRD), and the criteria applied. Results: Code lists were updated for the introduction of new Read codes and biological DMARDs. 3577/ 4161 (86%) of people met the updated algorithm for RA, compared to 61% in the original development study. 62.8% of people fulfilled both Criterion 1 and Criterion 2. Conclusions: Those wishing to define RA in the CPRD, should consider using this updated algorithm, rather than a single RA code, if they wish to identify only those who are most likely to have RA

    Experiences of South Asian patients in early inflammatory arthritis clinic: a qualitative interview study

    Get PDF
    Objective: The aim was to explore how UK South Asian patients living with RA interact with health care professionals and experience receiving health information in an early inflammatory arthritis clinic. Methods: A semi-structured interview schedule, designed in conjunction with a patient partner, was used for face-to-face interviews. South Asian participants with RA were recruited from Central Manchester University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust. Data were recorded and transcribed by an independent company. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Results: Fifteen participants were interviewed. Three predominant themes emerged around participants’ experiences and interaction with health care professionals in early inflammatory arthritis clinic. First, ‘the personal experiences of RA and cultural link to early inflammatory arthritis clinic’, where participants described the impact of RA as individuals and their altered roles within their cultural setting. Second, ‘experiences of interacting and receiving information in the early inflammatory arthritis clinic’, where participants described their limited engagement with health care professionals and the quality of information discussed in the clinic. Third, ‘views on future content for early inflammatory arthritis clinics’, where participants highlighted new innovative ideas to build on current practice. Conclusion: We believe this to be the first study to generate insight into the experiences of South Asian patients of interacting with health care professionals while attending an early inflammatory arthritis clinic. Policy directives aimed at improving access to services and delivery of information for ethnic minority groups in early inflammatory arthritis clinics should include consideration of the different roles of cultures. Professionals should be cognizant of the factors that drive health inequalities and focus on improving service delivery

    Delays in help seeking at the onset of the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic synthesis of qualitative literature

    Get PDF
    A systematic review of qualitative peer-reviewed publications was conducted to identify drivers of and barriers to help-seeking behaviour in adults with new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 1058 abstracts were searched to identify relevant publications. 21 relevant publications were identified assessed for quality and subjected to analysis informed by thematic and grounded theory frameworks. Several interacting themes were identified including the early experience of symptoms in relation to disease prototypes, minimising the impact of symptoms, speaking to others, gathering information and seeking alternative treatments, and issues related to accessing health services and attitudes towards healthcare professionals. Many people suggested that they had little knowledge of RA before diagnosis, believing RA to be a mild condition that affected older people. These misperceptions made correct symptom interpretation unlikely. Normalising and ignoring symptoms led people to delay in help-seeking. However, when symptoms impacted on daily activities help was usually sought. Individual interpretations of symptoms are both drivers of and barriers to help seeking. Targeted public health interventions are required to inform symptom interpretation and reduce delays

    A qualitative exploration of physical, mental and ocular fatigue in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    Get PDF
    Introduction Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) affects exocrine glands such as those producing the tear film, leading to dry and painful eyes, but is also associated with fatigue. The experience of fatigue in pSS, and its relationship with sicca symptoms, is poorly understood. Methods Twenty people diagnosed with pSS were recruited to participate in a semi-structured qualitative interview about their symptoms experience. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Results People with pSS described physical tiredness, mental fatigue and ocular fatigue. Mental fatigue was characterised by difficulties in attention, particularly, the ability to follow conversations and short-term memory problems. Participants linked their experience of fatigue to feeling of depression, frustration, irritation and anxiety, and therefore, fatigue was suggested to have had a large impact on their psychological well-being. People with pSS also described a range of ocular symptoms including pain, dryness, and itching, which were compounded by fatigue. For some, eye fatigue was pervasive, and daily activities involving the eyes such as reading, using the computer and driving were impaired. In some cases, the level of ocular discomfort was so severe it prevented sleep, which in turn impacted on general fatigue levels. Conclusions People with pSS experience fatigue in a range of ways; physical, mental and ocular fatigue were described. Fatigue was suggested to exacerbate other ocular symptoms, posed serious physical limitations and caused psychological distress. Further research into the nature of fatigue and ocular symptoms in pSS is required

    The potential role of community pharmacy staff in reducing patient delay in consulting with symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which can cause joint damage and reduced quality of life. Early treatment of RA within 3 months of symptom onset is associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, this window of opportunity is often missed. One important contributing factor is patients with symptoms of RA delaying consulting their general practitioner (GP). Previous research indicates that patients with inflammatory arthritis are likely to visit pharmacies for advice before consulting their GP. Therefore, pharmacists are well positioned to identify patients with symptoms of early inflammatory arthritis and signpost them appropriately. This research examines community pharmacy staff's knowledge, perceptions, and approaches to management of patients presenting with symptoms of RA in order to identify training needs and other opportunities for intervention to enhance the role of pharmacy staff in the pathway to care. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 community pharmacy staff in the West Midlands (UK), during a 12-month period (2017-2018). The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis facilitated by NVivo 12. RESULTS: There was considerable variation in knowledge and perceptions of RA and the need for early treatment amongst pharmacists and other pharmacy staff. The potential role of pharmacists and other pharmacy staff in reducing delay in help-seeking was also discussed. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis: (1) Variations in perceptions and knowledge about RA. (2) The role of the pharmacy in increasing public awareness about RA. (3) The role of the pharmacy staff in facilitating access to the GP. (4) Practical considerations for pharmacy-based interventions. CONCLUSION: Variability in knowledge and perceptions of RA amongst pharmacists, and amongst other pharmacy staff will affect effective signposting of suspected RA cases. This study identifies opportunities for enhanced training of community pharmacists and other pharmacy staff in relation to inflammatory arthritis as well as other pharmacy-based interventions, such as public awareness campaigns about RA and other musculoskeletal conditions. Together with existing referral services and other pharmacy-based initiatives this could result in enhanced signposting to GP consultation or other appropriate NHS services for inflammatory symptoms and reduced treatment delay

    The potential role of community pharmacy staff in reducing patient delay in consulting with symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which can cause joint damage and reduced quality of life. Early treatment of RA within 3 months of symptom onset is associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, this window of opportunity is often missed. One important contributing factor is patients with symptoms of RA delaying consulting their general practitioner (GP). Previous research indicates that patients with inflammatory arthritis are likely to visit pharmacies for advice before consulting their GP. Therefore, pharmacists are well positioned to identify patients with symptoms of early inflammatory arthritis and signpost them appropriately. This research examines community pharmacy staff's knowledge, perceptions, and approaches to management of patients presenting with symptoms of RA in order to identify training needs and other opportunities for intervention to enhance the role of pharmacy staff in the pathway to care. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 community pharmacy staff in the West Midlands (UK), during a 12-month period (2017-2018). The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis facilitated by NVivo 12. RESULTS: There was considerable variation in knowledge and perceptions of RA and the need for early treatment amongst pharmacists and other pharmacy staff. The potential role of pharmacists and other pharmacy staff in reducing delay in help-seeking was also discussed. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis: (1) Variations in perceptions and knowledge about RA. (2) The role of the pharmacy in increasing public awareness about RA. (3) The role of the pharmacy staff in facilitating access to the GP. (4) Practical considerations for pharmacy-based interventions. CONCLUSION: Variability in knowledge and perceptions of RA amongst pharmacists, and amongst other pharmacy staff will affect effective signposting of suspected RA cases. This study identifies opportunities for enhanced training of community pharmacists and other pharmacy staff in relation to inflammatory arthritis as well as other pharmacy-based interventions, such as public awareness campaigns about RA and other musculoskeletal conditions. Together with existing referral services and other pharmacy-based initiatives this could result in enhanced signposting to GP consultation or other appropriate NHS services for inflammatory symptoms and reduced treatment delay
    corecore