1,497 research outputs found

    Inclusion of exogenous enzymes in feedlot cattle diets: Impacts on physiology, rumen fermentation, digestibility and fatty acid profile in rumen and meat

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    The objective of this study was to evaluate if the inclusion of a blend composed of exogenous enzymes (amylase, protease, cellulase, xylanase and beta glucanase) in the individual and combined form in the feedlot steers diet has benefits on the physiology, rumen fermentation, digestibility and fatty acid profile in rumen and meat. The experiment used 24 animals, divided into 4 treatments, described as: T1-CON, T2-BLEND (0.5 g mixture of enzyme), T3-AMIL (0.5 g alpha-amylase), T4-BLEND+AMIL (0.5 g enzyme blend+ 0.5 g amylase). The concentration of mineral matter was higher in the meat of cattle of T4-BLEND+AMIL. A higher proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids was observed in the T3-AMIL group when compared to the others. The percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids was higher in the T2-BLEND and T4-BLEND+AMIL compared to the T1-CON. The combination of exogenous enzymes in the diet positively modulate nutritional biomarkers, in addition to benefits in the lipid and oxidative profile meat

    Associated production of prompt J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•\mathit{\Upsilon} mesons in pppp collisions at s=13‚ÄČTeV\sqrt{s}=13\,\mathrm{TeV}

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    International audienceThe associated production of prompt J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•\mathit{\mathit{\Upsilon}} mesons in pppp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s=13‚ÄČTeV\sqrt{s}=13\,\mathrm{TeV} is studied using LHCb data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4‚ÄČfb‚ąí14\,\mathrm{fb}^{-1}. The measurement is performed for J/ŌąJ/\psi (ő•\mathit{\Upsilon}) mesons with a transverse momentum pT<10‚ÄČ(30)‚ÄČGeV/cp_{\mathrm{T}}<10\,(30)\,\mathrm{GeV}/c in the rapidity range 2.0<y<4.52.0<y<4.5. In this kinematic range, the cross-section of the associated production of prompt J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•(1S)\mathit{\Upsilon}(1S) mesons is measured to be 133¬Ī22¬Ī7¬Ī3‚ÄČpb133 \pm 22 \pm 7 \pm 3 \, \mathrm{pb}, with a significance of 7.9‚ÄČŌÉ7.9\,\sigma, and that of prompt J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•(2S)\mathit{\Upsilon}(2S) mesons to be 76¬Ī21¬Ī4¬Ī7‚ÄČpb76\pm 21 \pm 4 \pm 7 \, \mathrm{pb}, with a significance of 4.9‚ÄČŌÉ4.9\,\sigma. The first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to uncertainties on the used branching fractions. This is the first observation of the associated production of J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•(1S)\mathit{\Upsilon}(1S) in proton-proton collisions. Differential cross-sections are measured as function of variables that are sensitive to kinematic correlations between the J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•(1S)\mathit{\Upsilon}(1S) mesons. The effective cross-sections of the associated production of prompt J/ŌąJ/\psi and ő•\mathit{\Upsilon} mesons are obtained and found to be compatible with measurements using other particle productions

    Pervasive gaps in Amazonian ecological research

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    Biodiversity loss is one of the main challenges of our time,1,2 and attempts to address it require a clear un derstanding of how ecological communities respond to environmental change across time and space.3,4 While the increasing availability of global databases on ecological communities has advanced our knowledge of biodiversity sensitivity to environmental changes,5‚Äď7 vast areas of the tropics remain understudied.8‚Äď11 In the American tropics, Amazonia stands out as the world‚Äôs most diverse rainforest and the primary source of Neotropical biodiversity,12 but it remains among the least known forests in America and is often underrepre sented in biodiversity databases.13‚Äď15 To worsen this situation, human-induced modifications16,17 may elim inate pieces of the Amazon‚Äôs biodiversity puzzle before we can use them to understand how ecological com munities are responding. To increase generalization and applicability of biodiversity knowledge,18,19 it is thus crucial to reduce biases in ecological research, particularly in regions projected to face the most pronounced environmental changes. We integrate ecological community metadata of 7,694 sampling sites for multiple or ganism groups in a machine learning model framework to map the research probability across the Brazilian Amazonia, while identifying the region‚Äôs vulnerability to environmental change. 15%‚Äď18% of the most ne glected areas in ecological research are expected to experience severe climate or land use changes by 2050. This means that unless we take immediate action, we will not be able to establish their current status, much less monitor how it is changing and what is being lostinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio

    Diminishing benefits of urban living for children and adolescents’ growth and development

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    Optimal growth and development in childhood and adolescence is crucial for lifelong health and well-being1‚Äď6. Here we used data from 2,325 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight from 71 million participants, to report the height and body-mass index (BMI) of children and adolescents aged 5‚Äď19 years on the basis of rural and urban place of residence in 200 countries and territories from 1990 to 2020. In 1990, children and adolescents residing in cities were taller than their rural counterparts in all but a few high-income countries. By 2020, the urban height advantage became smaller in most countries, and in many high-income western countries it reversed into a small urban-based disadvantage. The exception was for boys in most countries in sub-Saharan Africa and in some countries in Oceania, south Asia and the region of central Asia, Middle East and north Africa. In these countries, successive cohorts of boys from rural places either did not gain height or possibly became shorter, and hence fell further behind their urban peers. The difference between the age-standardized mean BMI of children in urban and rural areas was <1.1 kg m‚Äď2 in the vast majority of countries. Within this small range, BMI increased slightly more in cities than in rural areas, except in south Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and some countries in central and eastern Europe. Our results show that in much of the world, the growth and developmental advantages of living in cities have diminished in the twenty-first century, whereas in much of sub-Saharan Africa they have amplified

    Pervasive gaps in Amazonian ecological research