911 research outputs found

    Exploring students\u27 use of feedback during occupational therapy level II fieldwork experiences

    Get PDF
    Researchers confirmed that the use of feedback assists with the improvement of students’ confidence and performance. Multiple studies focus on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if, or how, students internalized the feedback to apply it successfully. Since there is a difference between providing feedback and the interpretation of its true message, this phenomenon was studied to add empirical knowledge regarding students’ feedback interpretation. This qualitative study explores the perceptions of how students interpret information received from Level II fieldwork educators and what meanings students attributed to the feedback. The use of phenomenological methodology guided the collection of information-rich data through reflective statements and semi-structured interviews. Twenty-three occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant graduates volunteered to participate in the interviews. Verbatim transcripts were coded to identify themes and patterns. Participants identified indicators verifying the correct application of feedback, as well as situations affecting the interpretation and application of feedback provided during an experiential learning opportunity. The findings facilitate guidance for educators and students to understand factors that could affect feedback application

    A phenomenological approach to architecture: the colon-wurth winery

    Get PDF
    THIS THESIS INVESTIGATES THE MAKING OF PLACE THROUGH AN ARCHITECTURE THAT SENSUOUSLY ENGAGES THE BODY. CREATING A WHOLE PHENOMENOLOGI-CAL EXPERIENCE FOR THE OCCUPANT. IF EXPERIENCES ARE REDUCED TO VISUAL ABSTRACTIONS AND DIMENSION. THEN WE HAVE REDUCED OURSELVES TO MERE OBSERVERS. THE BODY AND THE SENSES ARE CRITICAL BECAUSE THEY PLACES US IN THE HERE AND NOW-THEY HELP US TO DEVELOP AN INTIMACY WITH THEPLACE. SEVERAL QUALITIES DEFINE THIS INTIMACY. THESE INCLUDE MATERIALITY (TOUCH): ACOUSTICS (HEARING). TOPOGRAPHY. AND LUMINOSITY OF PLACE(LIGHT AND SHADOW) SMELL OF A PLACE AND EVEN CLIMATE. IN THIS THESIS. IHAVE EXPLORED HOW ARCHITECTURE CAN FOSTER AND SUSTAIN A SYNESTHETIC EXPERIENCE. MOVING BEYOND LIMITS OF THE FORMAL AND VISUAL.SITEThe winery is on Highway 29. 7 miles north of St. Helena in calistoga.California, it provides unique opportunities and constraints, dividedINTO North and south sectors by a public road, the north sector is dominated BY A HEAVILY WOODED KNOLL. THIS IS IDEAL FOR CREATING CAVES TO AGE WINE AT A CONSTANT TEMPERATURE IN THE EARTH

    AIDS And The Funeral Industry In Southeastern Africa

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the impact of AIDS on the Funeral Industry in Southeastern Africa.  It first presents an overview of AIDS in Southeastern Africa and then it delves into an examination of family funeral customs in select countries and how they have been affected by the AIDS epidemic.  These countries include:  Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Botswana, and Uganda.  Next, this paper takes a look at the impact of AIDS on hospital mortuaries in Zimbabwe.  This is followed by an examination of the rise in the number of orphans along with the effect of AIDS on the classroom setting.  Finally, four suggestions for fighting the disease are presented

    Comprehensive Look at Cutting Fluid Maintenance and Waste Reduction Program

    Get PDF
    This paper discusses the development of a cutting fluid management program and a waste reduction program that will allow facilities to extend cutting fluid life, improve performance, and more importantly reduce costs. The major conclusion derived from this research is that selection of a coolant recovery systems depends on many factors which concerns the facility such as type of coolant being recovered, type of metal chips in the coolant, the existing cutting fluid maintenance program, etc. Hence, there may be several coolant recovery system, which incorporates different technologies, that can be installed and used within a specific industry. Therefore, being a able to work closely with one's coolant supplier and recycling equipment supplier besides having a complete understanding of the in question facility situation are a vital part in purchasing a cutting fluid and recovery system

    Clinical Utility of the Adapted Biopsychosocial Model: An Initial Validation Through Peer Review

    Get PDF
    Background: The World Health Organization has called on health care providers to adopt a biopsychosocial approach to improve health and well-being and reduce disability. While a variety of holistic models exist in occupational therapy, none are explicitly biopsychosocial and use language consistent with both the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. Following the recent introduction of the Adapted Biopsychosocial Model (A-BPSM), this study served as an initial step toward validation of this model for use in occupational therapy. Method: A qualitative descriptive design was implemented with a maximum variation purposive sample of 30 participants, including occupational therapy students, clinicians, and educators. The participants were interviewed regarding their perceptions of the utility of the A-BPSM. A thematic analysis approach was used. Results: The participant data supported three major themes relating to the participants’ perceptions of the A-BPSM: clarity, utility, and anticipated competence for application. Conclusion: The findings support an initial step toward validation of the model and serve to offer occupational therapists an adapted biopsychosocial model of care. Recommendations include further evaluation of this model in comparison with existing models, as well as the application of the model to other disciplines

    The Biopsychosocial Model: Application to Occupational Therapy Practice

    Get PDF
    Despite the call for the profession to embrace a more integrated and holistic approach to practice, therapists may be faced with practical challenges, including issues relating to client caseloads, productivity demands, scheduling, entrenched practices, limitations on service imposed by payer sources, and staffing and budgetary restraints, to name but a few. Due to these limitations, current occupational therapy practice may be predisposed to adopt a more reductive approach to the evaluation and treatment of symptoms, underlying biological pathologies, and resulting impairments and disabilities. Therefore, psychological and social factors may be neglected, resulting in an unbalanced, fragmented, and incomplete approach to patient care. This paper examines a more holistic and integrated biopsychosocial approach in current occupational therapy practice. Furthermore, an exploration of the Biopsychosocial Model, its relevance to the profession of occupational therapy, and the proposed methods of application toward a more holistic, evidence-based, and client-centered approach to clinical practice is addressed

    Evaluation of a semiquantitative SNAP test for measurement of bile acids in dogs

    Get PDF
    Background. Serum bile acids (SBA) are used as a routine screening tool of liver function in dogs. Serum samples are usually shipped to a referral laboratory for quantitative analysis with an enzymatic chemistry analyzer. The canine SNAP Bile Acids Test (SNAP-BAT) provides an immediate, semi-quantitative measurement of bile acid concentrations in-house. With the SNAP-BAT, bile acids concentrations of 5–30 µmol/L are quantified, and results outside of that range are classified as 30 µmol/L. Agreement of the SNAP-BAT with the enzymatic method has not been extensively investigated.Objectives. The purposes of this prospective clinical study were to assess the precision of the SNAP-BAT and determine agreement of SNAP-BAT with results from an in-house chemistry analyzer.Methods. After verifying intra-assay precision of the SNAP-BAT, a prospective analysis was performed using blood samples collected from 56 dogs suspected to have liver disease. Each sample was analyzed with an enzymatic, in-house chemistry analyzer and the SNAP-BAT. Agreement between the two methods was statistically assessed using the κ index of agreement.Results. Intra-assay variability was minimal. The κ index for agreement between the SNAP-BAT and routine chemistry analyzer was between 0.752 and 0.819, indicating substantial to near perfect agreement.Conclusions. The SNAP-BAT is a highly accurate, semi-quantitative test that yields immediate results, and has very little intra-assay variability, particularly for results >30 µmol/L

    The effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment on length of stay in posterolateral postthoracotomy patients: A retrospective case note study

    Get PDF
    Objective This study retrospectively evaluated the effect of OMT on length of stay (LOS) in hospitalized posterolateral postthoracotomy patients. Methods Inpatient medical records of patients who received posterolateral thoracotomies with lung resection between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed for demographic data, LOS, thoracotomy surgery data, consultation data excluding osteopathic manipulative medicine, discharge data, and osteopathic manipulative medicine consultation data. Results Thirty-eight patients received posterolateral thoracotomies with lung resection; 23 patients received OMT and 15 did not. The mean (standard deviation) LOS was 11.0 (6.8) days (range, 5–29 days) for those who received OMT and 10.4 (5.5) days (range, 3–22 days) for those who did not (P = .90). Five patients developed postoperative ileus, and all had received OMT. Patients receiving 2 surgical procedures had a longer LOS than those receiving 1 surgical procedure (P = .002). Having a decortication performed during the thoracotomy increased LOS by a mean of 6.4 days (P = .005). Patients admitted directly to the intensive care unit were more likely to receive OMT than those who were not (P = .03). Conclusion While there was no difference in LOS, severity of illness was different between patients who received OMT and those who did not. Patients who developed postoperative ileus and most of those admitted directly to the intensive care unit received OMT, suggesting that severity of illness was greater for those who received OMT. Future studies should include a higher subject number in order to stratify for illness severity and also assess the effect of OMT on postoperative pain

    Predictors of medication-related problems among medicaid patients participating in a pharmacist-provided telephonic medication therapy management program

    Get PDF
    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of medication-related problems (MRPs) among Medicaid patients participating in a telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) program. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of data from patients enrolled in a previously published study. DATA SOURCES: Two Medicaid administrative claims file databases (for health care utilization and prescription dispensing information) and one pharmacy organization file for MTM program information. PATIENTS: Seven hundred twelve adult Medicaid patients who participated in a statewide pharmacist-provided telephone-based MTM program and who received an initial medication therapy review. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary dependent variable was the number of MRPs detected during the initial medication therapy review. Secondary dependent variables were the detection of one or more MRPs related to indication, effectiveness, safety, and adherence. Predictor variables were selected a priori that, from the literature and our own practice experiences, were hypothesized as being potentially associated with MRPs: demographics, comorbidities, medication use, and health care utilization. Bivariate analyses were performed, and multivariable models were constructed. All predictor variables with significant associations (defined a priori as p<0.1) with the median number of MRPs detected were then entered into a three-block multiple linear regression model. The overall model was significant (p<0.001, R(2) = 0.064). Significant predictors of any MRPs (p<0.05) were total number of medications, obesity, dyslipidemia, and one or more emergency department visits in the past 3 months. For indication-related MRPs, the model was significant (p<0.001, R(2) = 0.049), and predictors included female sex, obesity, dyslipidemia, and total number of medications (p<0.05). For effectiveness-related MRPs, the model was significant (p<0.001, R(2) = 0.054), and predictors included bone disease and dyslipidemia (p<0.05). For safety-related MRPs, the model was significant (p<0.001, R(2) = 0.046), and dyslipidemia was a predictor (p<0.05). No significant predictors of adherence-related MRPs were identified. CONCLUSION: This analysis supports the relative importance of number of medications as a predictor of MRPs in the Medicaid population and identifies other predictors. However, given the models' low R(2) values, these findings indicate that other unknown factors are clearly important and that criteria commonly used for determining MTM eligibility may be inadequate in identifying appropriate patients for MTM in a Medicaid population

    Labour Trajectories and Aspirations of Nepali ‘Adult Entertainment Sector’ Workers

    Get PDF
    This IDS Working Paper explores the labour trajectories and aspirations, and the labour intermediaries of Nepali ‘Adult Entertainment Sector’ (‘AES’) workers. Our research objective was to understand these experiences to develop more effective policies and interventions to prevent human trafficking as well as labour and sex exploitation. Research included a literature review, interviews with ‘AES’ workers, and observations in areas with reported elevated levels of human trafficking to visualise the economic activities. This Working Paper has a companion paper – Getting Work: The Role of Labour Intermediaries for Workers in Nepal and the International ‘Adult Entertainment Sector’ – which focuses on the role of labour intermediaries, their aspirations, and their perceptions about the benefits and costs of facilitating work in the ‘AES’ and other employment.United States Agency for International Development (USAID)Winrock InternationalForeign, Commonwealth & Development Offic
    • …
    corecore