7,265 research outputs found

    The highlands of contemporary Guatemala

    Get PDF

    Cultural geography: a survey of perceptions held by Cultural Geography Specialty Group members

    Get PDF
    As of the year 2000, the Cultural Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers had 465 members and ranked fourth overall in total membership within the association. Furthermore, cultural geographers had the second fastest growing specialty group between 1993 and 1998, after the Geographic Perspectives on Women specialty group. In spite of this demonstrated overwhelming appeal among geographers, to date, no one has systematically analyzed the subdiscipline of cultural geography to determine such things as its links to other aspects of the discipline, its major scholarly contributions, its most highly regarded publication outlets, its notable practitioners, and its most recognized departments. As the ranks of cultural geographers have swelled, the subdiscipline has become multifaceted. This article contextualizes and interprets the results of a survey sent to members of the 1998–1999 Cultural Geography Specialty Group. Outcomes include Louisiana State University and the University of Texas at Austin listed as offering the strongest cultural geography departments, Wilbur Zelinsky being deemed the subfield's most outstanding living practitioner, and the Annals of the Association of American Geographers named the journal that best meets cultural geographers’ needs

    Social choice theory, game theory, and positive political theory

    Get PDF
    We consider the relationships between the collective preference and non-cooperative game theory approaches to positive political theory. In particular, we show that an apparently decisive difference between the two approachesthat in sufficiently complex environments (e.g. high-dimensional choice spaces) direct preference aggregation models are incapable of generating any prediction at all, whereas non-cooperative game-theoretic models almost always generate predictionis indeed only an apparent difference. More generally, we argue that when modeling collective decisions there is a fundamental tension between insuring existence of well-defined predictions, a criterion of minimal democracy, and general applicability to complex environments; while any two of the three are compatible under either approach, neither collective preference nor non-cooperative game theory can support models that simultaneously satisfy all three desiderata

    Detached from their homeland: the Latter-day Saints of Chihuahua, Mexico

    Get PDF
    Over the past few decades, the homeland concept has received an ever-increasing amount of attention by cultural geographers. While the debate surrounding the necessity and applicability of the concept continues, it is more than apparent that no other geographic term (including culture areas or culture regions) captures the essence of peoples’ attachment to place better than homeland. The literature, however, provides few examples of the deep-seated loyalty people have for a homeland despite being physically detached from that space. Employing land use mapping and informal interviews, this paper seeks to help fill that gap by exemplifying how the daily lives of Mormons living in Chihuahua, Mexico reflect their connection to the United States and the Mormon Homeland. Our research revealed that, among other things, the Anglo residents perpetuate their cultural identity through their unique self-reference, exhibit territoriality links reflected in their built environment, and demonstrate unconditional bonding to their homeland through certain holiday celebrations. It is clear to us, as the Anglo-Mormon experience illustrates, that the homeland concept deserves a place within the geographic lexicon

    Jackknife Estimator of Species Richness with S-PLUS

    Get PDF
    An estimate of the number of species, S , usually called species richness by ecologists, in an area is one of the basic statistics used to ascertain biological diversity. Traditionally ecologists have used the number of species observed in a sample, S_0 , to estimate S , realizing that S_0 is a lower bound for S . One alternative to S_0 is to use a nonparametric procedure such as jackknife resampling. For species richness, a closed form of the jackknife estimator is available. Typically statistical software contains only the traditional iterative form of the jackknife estimator. The purpose of this article is to propose an S-PLUS function for calculating the noniterative first order jackknife estimator of species richness and some associated plots and statistics.

    Characterizing contemporary U.S. immigration : three types of rural Mexican migrants

    Get PDF
    The U.S. prides itself as being a country of immigrants. Yet, each successive wave of newly arriving people has been accompanied by stresses and strains within American society. Likewise, each wave of immigrants has been motivated by different factors. Some have sought better economic opportunities or religious and political freedoms while others have escaped war, famine, or persecution. Since 1965, Mexico has been the leading country of origin for immigrants arriving in the U.S. As represented in the rhetoric surrounding the 2016 Presidential elections, the general public is largely uninformed about the distinctions among Mexican immigrants. Popular perception holds that Mexican immigrants are a homogeneous population possessing the same objectives when coming to the U.S. The purpose of this article is to highlight the three types of migrants leaving rural Mexico. Based on data gathered from ethnographic fieldwork, I show that goal-oriented migrants differ dramatically in demographic characteristics than migrants who come repeatedly or permanently settle in the U.S. This article articulates what motivates differing Mexican immigrants with the hope that the information will help officials better serve this large and diverse population

    Data Model and Software Tools for Modeling Picking Operations

    Get PDF
    Presenter will provide

    "We are the Ones We have been Waiting for": The U.S. Social Forum in Context

    Get PDF

    Jackknife Estimator of Species Richness with S-PLUS

    Get PDF
    An estimate of the number of species, S , usually called species richness by ecologists, in an area is one of the basic statistics used to ascertain biological diversity. Traditionally ecologists have used the number of species observed in a sample, S0 , to estimate S , realizing that S0 is a lower bound for S . One alternative to S0 is to use a nonparametric procedure such as jackknife resampling. For species richness, a closed form of the jackknife estimator is available. Typically statistical software contains only the traditional iterative form of the jackknife estimator. The purpose of this article is to propose an S-PLUS function for calculating the noniterative first order jackknife estimator of species richness and some associated plots and statistics

    Elections, Coalitions, and Legislative Outcomes

    Get PDF
    This paper develops a multi-stage game-theoretic model of three-party competition under proportional representation. The final policy outcome of the game is generated by a non-cooperative bargaining game between the parties in the elected legislature. This game is essentially defined by the vote shares each party receives in the general election, and the parties' electoral policy positions. At the electoral stage parties and voters are strategic in that they take account of the legislative implications of any electoral outcome. We solve for equilibrium electoral positions by the parties and final policy outcomes
    corecore