39 research outputs found

    Editorial

    Get PDF
    What stands out in the articles in this issue, for us, is the depth of thinking.  Thinking is sorely needed at a time when neo-liberalist agendas push the art therapy profession further and further into a realm which favours simplistic methods and narrow goals, where the subversive, anarchic aspects of art, and the freedom involved in bringing ‘whatever’ into open-ended therapeutic relationships, is seen as a luxury of the past, even perhaps, as transgressive. There is a split between theory and practice involved here and we need to start thinking of theory making itself as a practice and to recognise that all that we say and do is inseparable from it, and is political. This understanding is behind the papers published in this issue

    Book Review. Art Therapy for Social Justice: Radical Intersections. Edited by Savneet K. Talwar.

    No full text
    This book is a must read for art therapists around the world. Whilst it is born of, and intrinsically related to, its context in the USA, the issues it raises are important for us all. The main message of the book is that art therapy needs to shift its focus away from treatments for individualised pathologies – deficit models, to practices that prioritise radical caring and social justice based on the recognition that social, political and cultural conditions shape our lives and are responsible for mental health problems disproportionately affecting the less advantaged

    Book Review. Art Therapy across Cultural and Race Boundaries: Working with Identity. By Lorette Dye

    No full text
    There is very little in Art Therapy that tackles the difficulties of working cross-culturally and with issues of race; in this respect this book is to be welcomed. It is a practical book rather than a theoretical one, and as such, is the first of its kind in this subject area that I know of. The author, Lorette Dye, clearly has a wealth of experience working with people who come from different cultural groups than her own, mainly in various countries in Africa, and in the USA, and the lessons she has learnt from this form the first section.

    Exhibition Review. Mr A Moves in Mysterious Ways: Selected Artists from the Adamson Collection. Peltz Gallery

    No full text
    The ‘Mr A’ of the exhibition title is, of course, Edward Adamson himself and taken from a picture done by Martin Birch in 1969 whilst he was a patient in Netherne Hospital where Adamson worked from 1946 to 1981. The exhibition comprises sixteen art works on paper, a number of painted flint stones, a series of ten projected images (all made in his studio) plus a short essay film ‘Abandoned Goods’ by Pia Borg and Edward Lawrenson, Fly Films 2014. The exhibition has been curated by Dr Heather Tilley (Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow, Department of English and Humanities) and Dr Fiona Johnstone (Associate Research fellow, department of Art History), in association with Birkbeck’s Centre for Medical Humanities.

    Art Therapy Large Group

    Get PDF
    We, the conference organisers, hoped the provision of an Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) for the conference on each of the three days, would give delegates the opportunity to explore, through the use of art, performance and dialogue, their experiences of the conference and the dynamics that arise in a large group. We had run an ATLG at our first art therapy conference (Finding a voice, making your mark: defining art therapy for the 21st century) in 2013, and hoped there might be some continuity between the first and second ATLG, a development of the dialogue of word, performance and image through time

    Public and Private Spaces in Art Therapy

    Get PDF
    This paper explores the public/private binary in art therapy. The public space is often associated with art being taken out of the art therapeutic space to be exhibited in galleries and sometimes sold, one of the aims being to promote art therapy practice and the plight of those who participate in it. Here it sits uncomfortably with the idea of art as commodity. The private space is associated with art therapeutic practice that is confidential and in which the art stays within the boundary of the therapy until therapy is finished. The emphasis is more commonly on process than product. However, art therapy sessions themselves have now also become commodities to be bought and sold. The paper argues that the public/private binary is operational in all art therapy practice whether or not the art leaves the therapeutic space. Art is a language that, by definition, can communicate without artist/patient to explain it or identifiable audience to view it. It exists between ‘self’ and ‘other’, but ‘self’ is infused with the public and social world and ‘other’ contains the projections of the self. The paper explores how these private/public dynamics can be harnessed, in an ethical way, to best serve our clients. Art therapy work from a group for victims of torture is used to illustrate the points. Keywords: Groups, Ethics, Refugees, Exhibition, Charities, Boundaries

    The impact of the Art Therapy Large Group, an educational tool in the training of art therapists, on post-qualification professional practice

    Get PDF
    This article reports the findings of a Likert scale survey that was sent to past graduates of the MA Art Psychotherapy, Goldsmiths, University of London asking them about the relevance of their experience in the Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) to their subsequent employment as art therapists or work in another capacity. The ATLG comprises all the students and staff in a psychodynamically based experiential group that meets six times during the year. Survey questions were drawn from previously devised theory and related to learning relevant to the workplace and the development of professional identity. Though there was a low response rate (20%), there were some significant findings, namely that graduates found the ATLG to be helpful in their work, whether this was art therapy or non-art therapy work, and that those who had studied part-time were much more positive about the applicability of their learning in the group to their work than those who had studied full-time. The findings suggest that the ATLG has a particular role in meeting key performance indicators in professional regulation and teaching and in quality assurance and employability policies in higher education. Finally, the potential for the use of the ATLG beyond the university in the public, private and voluntary sectors is suggested

    From the Conference Organiser

    No full text
    Welcome to this International Art Therapy Conference: Finding a Voice, Making a Mark. First of all I would like to introduce the conference organising committee – Stand Up! Robin Tipple, Chris Brown, Kevin Jones, Jill Westwood, Lesley Morris, Susan Rudnik, Lisa Sewell, Diana Velada, Dean Reddick, Sandra Marcantuono, Susan Williams, Barbara Allen, Vivienne Rose. There are also others who are not here but have been working behind the scenes and will be working tirelessly during the conference.This is us, and who are you? Well, there are 26 countries represented here from 6 continents, so I am pleased to say that this is a truly international conference

    Book Review: Sheridan Linnell (2010) 'Rethinking Research and Professional Practices in Terms of Relationality, Subjectivity and Power: Art Psychotherapy & Narrative Therapy: An Account of Practitioner Research'

    No full text
    I can (truly) say that this book opens up new and exciting territory for art therapy, an invisible wall has at last been dismantled. It is a very brave book as well as a very scholarly book. Linnell introduces poststructuralist ideas, primarily from Foucault, Derrida and Butler, examines similarities and differences between two therapeutic practices, art therapy and narrative therapy with their convergent theoretical underpinnings, and in expressive detail, poetically explores her clinical practice in relation to the ideas. Top of the agenda are relations of power in a postcolonial context, in gender and race and between therapist and client

    The Art Therapy Large Group

    Get PDF
    We decided to have an Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) on the three days of the conference to create a place where all those participating in the conference could come together to engage in a reflective space. The aim was for the group to explore the interplay between ”˜Finding a Voice and Making a Mark’ and through doing so, gain a sense of their own experiential learning in relation to the conference as a whole. We hoped that participants would be able to recognise the dynamics, as they were represented and enacted in the ATLG, which shape the international profession of art therapy. The idea was that participants might experience the similarities and differences in the use of art in therapy around the world, with the purpose of harnessing these towards the development and progression of the practice of art therapy internationally
    corecore