33 research outputs found

    DataSheet1_Linking land use with riverine water quality: A multi-spatial scale analysis relating to various riparian strips.PDF

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    Exploring linkages between riverine water quality and land use is of great importance for catchment management and water quality conservation. Relationships between them are complex and site-specific. Therefore, land-use/landscape effects on water quality remain to be investigated. Multivariate statistics and empirical models are used to examine the influences of seasonality (wet and dry seasons), land use in various riparian strips, on water quality seasonality in the river networks of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Redundancy analysis (RDA) shows a comparable effect of land use on overall water quality (OWQ) during the two seasons. The variance of OWQ explained is generally higher in the 50 m riparian zone, whilst, the variance is higher along 200 m riparian in the wet season with land use composition presented as actual area. The explanatory variables of land use indices for the OWQ are quite distinct. Multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling indicates that models of water quality parameters (WQPs) depend on seasonality, riparian zone and representation of land use indices (calculated from percentage and actual area), this results in predictor variables of WQPs are highly variable. Land use within the 50 m riparian zone can predict WQPs well, and land use along the riparian zones predicts WQPs better in the dry season. We firstly compared the impacts of multi-riparian land use indices (presented as percentage and actual area) in combination with land use configuration on water quality. Our study provides critical information for efficiently land-use planning to protect water quality.</p

    Table_1_Explaining differences in self-focused and other-involved public health preventive behaviors between the US and China: the role of self- construal and health locus of control.docx

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    BackgroundThis study examined national similarities and differences in people's engagement in health preventive behaviors during a public health crisis, as well as investigated the underlying individual-level psychological mechanisms. A conceptual distinction was made between self-focused and other-involved preventive behaviors in response to public health crises.MethodTwo cross-sectional surveys were conducted in the United States (N = 888) and China (N = 844) during the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Hayes' PROCESS was utilized to assess national differences in seven preventive behaviors, along with the mediating effects of self-construal and health locus of control.ResultsThe results showed that American participants reported greater engagement in self-focused preventive behaviors than Chinese, whereas Chinese participants reported greater engagement in other-involved preventive behaviors than Americans. Chinese participants also engaged more in other-involved than self-focused preventive behaviors. Self-construal and health locus of control partially explained the observed differences in engagement in preventive behaviors.DiscussionThis study introduces a culture-sensitive approach to provide insights for crafting communication interventions that can enhance the effectiveness of health campaigns in the context of a public health crisis.</p

    Pearson correlation coefficients between land use/land cover (LULC) in the subcatchment and river major elements of the upper Han River basin, China.

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    <p>VEG, vegetated lands (forest and shrub); AGR, agriculture; URB, urban; BAR, bareland; WAT, waters.</p><p>Bold values represent correlation with significance (<sup>a</sup>Significance at the 0.05; probability level; <sup>b</sup>Significance at the 0.01 probability level).</p

    DataSheet1_The combined effects of land use and seasonal environmental factors on stream food web structure.docx

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    Land use and seasonal changes in environmental conditions influence biological communities and their trophic interactions in riverine ecosystems. However, how land use and the seasonality of environmental conditions jointly influence the food web structure of riverine ecosystems remains unclear. Here, we conducted a comparative study on basal resources, macroinvertebrates, and fish at woodland and urban sites to explore the combined effects of land use and environmental conditions during spring, autumn, and winter on the food web structure of a subtropical river in China. We used δ13C and δ15N to trace consumers’ diets and calculate community-level metrics within food webs. At woodland sites, we found that allochthonous sources contributed significantly more to consumers’ diets in the high flow season (53%) than in the low flow season (around 30%), but allochthonous sources contributed less than 30% at urban sites. The seasonal flooding facilitated the acquisition of terrestrial sources at woodland sites, while the impervious surface cover at urban sites cut off the influx of terrestrial inputs. The isotopic niche space of basal resources at both woodland and urban sites was significantly higher in the high flow season. However, the isotopic niche space of consumers at urban sites was not significantly different between seasons. Trophic length, niche width, and trophic redundancy showed no seasonal differences at urban sites, but trophic length increased significantly during the high flow season at woodland sites. Our temporal food web study at urban and woodland rivers illustrated the combined effects of land use and seasonal environmental conditions on the food web structure, and highlighted the role of allochthonous carbon in supporting biological communities and the importance of lateral and longitudinal connectivity in river ecosystems.</p

    Changes of water chemistry during 2005–2010 in the upper Han River, China (red line represents mean values).

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    <p>Changes of water chemistry during 2005–2010 in the upper Han River, China (red line represents mean values).</p

    Pearson correlation coefficients between LULC within 200 m and 500 m buffer zone and river major elements of the upper Han River basin, China.

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    <p>VEG, vegetated lands (forest and shrub); AGR, agriculture; URB, urban; BAR, bareland.</p><p>Bold values represent correlation with significance (<sup>a</sup>Significance at the 0.05; probability level; <sup>b</sup>Significance at the 0.01 probability level).</p

    Pearson correlation matrix for major ions of the upper Han River basin, China.

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    a<p>Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed).</p>b<p>Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).</p

    Stepwise multiple regression models for major elements and LULC in the subcatchment level of the upper Han River basin, China.

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    <p>VEG, vegetated lands (forest and shrub); AGR, agriculture; URB, urban; BAR, bareland; WAT, waters.</p><p>The elements without regression models are not listed.</p><p>Significance at 0.05 probability level.</p
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