504 research outputs found

    Why Aren't They Teaching? A study of why some University of Alaska teacher education graduates aren't in classrooms

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    Alaska Statute 14.40.190(b), passed as Senate Bill 241 in 2008, requires the University of Alaska (UA) Board of Regents to submit a report each regular session titled Alaska’s University for Alaska’s Schools that “describes the efforts of the university to attract, train, and retain qualified public school teachers.” In 2012 this report documented that approximately 50% of UA initial teacher preparation graduates did not teach in Alaska public schools after completing their programs. Unfortunately, the data available could not tell us the reasons why so many graduates were not employed as teachers. In response to legislators’ questions about this, the three UA Education deans (with support from the Center for Alaska Education Policy Research) made a commitment to conduct a 2012 research project to understand why graduates of UA initial teacher preparation programs did or did not teach in Alaska public schools after completing their programs. This project was conducted in response to that commitment

    City Building on the Eastern Frontier

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    America's westward expansion involved more than pushing the frontier across the Mississippi toward the Pacific; it also consisted of urbanizing undeveloped regions of the colonial states. In 1810, New York's future governor DeWitt Clinton marveled that the "rage for erecting villages is a perfect mania." The development of Rochester and Syracuse illuminates the national experience of internal economic and cultural colonization during the first half of the nineteenth century. Architectural historian Diane Shaw examines the ways in which these new cities were shaped by a variety of constituents—founders, merchants, politicians, and settlers—as opportunities to extend the commercial and social benefits of the market economy and a merchant culture to America's interior. At the same time, she analyzes how these priorities resulted in a new approach to urban planning.According to Shaw, city founders and residents deliberately arranged urban space into three segmented districts—commercial, industrial, and civic—to promote a self-fulfilling vision of a profitable and urbane city. Shaw uncovers a distinctly new model of urbanization that challenges previous paradigms of the physical and social construction of nineteenth-century cities. Within two generations, the new cities of Rochester and Syracuse were sorted at multiple scales, including not only the functional definition of districts, but also the refinement of building types and styles, the stratification of building interiors by floor, and even the coding of public space by class, gender, and race. Shaw's groundbreaking model of early nineteenth-century urban design and spatial culture is a major contribution to the interdisciplinary study of the American city

    Intertextual Episodes in Lectures: A Classification from the Perspective of Incidental Learning from Reading

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    In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students are expected to work in.  Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragement to read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so. A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE)  was examined for the types of reference to reading which occur, classified by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Such references were called ‘intertextual episodes’. Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identified.  In some disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this category was not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the text. Three of them involved management, of texts by the lecturer her/him self, of student writing, or of student reading. The remaining three involved reference to the content of the text either introducing to students, reporting its content, or, really the most interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reporting that certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of student reading. Relativization was relatively infrequent. The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for an experimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the references actually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment

    The Inside Out of the Ageing Self: Identity, Trust, and Friendship of Australian Seniors in an Online Community of Older People

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    This thesis explores how older people are successfully connecting online and how they integrate those experiences into their everyday lives. While there is an emerging body of research contributing to the anthropology of ageing that is concerned with online sociality of older people, the interactions between online and offline sociability of older Australians has not been anthropologically examined. This thesis contributes a unique and in-depth long term ethnographic study to broader perspectives of ageing by adding the voices of older Australians to contemporary understandings of social connectedness in a world that relies more and more on using technology to maintain relationships with each other. The research is based on fourteen months of fieldwork, October 2009 to January 2010, conducted in an online community of approximately 12,000 members who identified themselves as sixty years of age or older. The ethnographic study design involved the creation of a profile, the development of online relationships, extensive exploration of the social networking site, and the creation of an online focus-group. In addition, home stays and face-to-face interviews were conducted in Australia to understand the relationship between placing self-aware content online in a trusting manner, and its convergence with understandings of the self within the social context of everyday lives. Examination of the experiences of older people ethnographically within the characteristics of their own social settings, online and offline, provides a rich understanding of social context that challenges predominant assumptions linked to ageing discourses. These include public health policies associated with loss and decline, popular cultural discourses and representations of ageing, and grievances related to the socio-economic burden that the ageing population is perceived to have on western states.Social isolation has been shown to be problematic for older people as friends diminish over the life span. This thesis argues that the Internet provides new pathways to source and establish new friends that are meaningful to participants based on their own likes and dislikes, and moral values. Older people bring to the online context well defined understandings of trust which they rely on to make friends with strangers. This thesis contributes to contemporary anthropological debates concerning trust, and the ability to establish trust online. Utilizing an acute awareness of the self, older people provided visual and textual cues as narrations of the self on homepages to describe who they think they are in terms that they perceived were accurate representation of identity. Graphics and text enhancement were used as symbols of meaning to create a culture of social inclusion that celebrated ageing amongst peers in a trusting environment. Technology affords older people with an opportunity to express the self in a variety of contexts without the distractions of the ageing physical self, and this allowed the youthful, unencumbered internal self to emerge and be shared with others. The ability to be able to maintain a continuity of the self with strangers was the reason why communicating online for older people was considered to be so rewarding and meaningful.Thesis (Ph.D.) -- University of Adelaide, School of Social Sciences, 201

    An overview of the research evidence on ethnicity and communication in healthcare

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    • The aim of the present study was to identify and review the available research evidence on 'ethnicity and communication' in areas relevant to ensuring effective provision of mainstream services (e.g. via interpreter, advocacy and translation services); provision of services targeted on communication (e.g. speech and language therapy, counselling, psychotherapy); consensual/ participatory activities (e.g. consent to interventions), and; procedures for managing and planning for linguistic diversity

    Perspectives of two ethnically different pre-service teacher populations as they learn about folk literature

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    This is the authors' accepted manuscript, post peer-review. The publisher's official version can be found at: http://scholarlyexchange.org/ojs/index.php/JERI/article/view/9529/7041.The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service teachers’ knowledge of folk literature in general and that of a selected country or culture in particular before and after studying it in a college children's literature course and completing an assignment. We specifically compared two sample populations: those of primarily European American descent at a research university and those of Native American ethnicity at an Inter-tribal Native American university to see if there were similarities or differences in their knowledge about and value of folk literature. Participants from each university were selected to complete a pre-post questionnaire and a post-interview about what they learned about folk literature in general and a particular country or culture's stories as well. Analysis of the data showed similarity between the two sample populations on their knowledge of folk literature and understanding of other countries/cultures. There were differences in their projected application of the learned information. Implications for teacher educators are discussed

    Perspectives of Two Ethnically Different Pre-service Teacher Populations as They Learn About Folk Literature

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service teachers’ knowledge of folk literature in general and that of a selected country or culture in particular before and after studying it in a college children\u27s literature course and completing an assignment. We specifically compared two sample populations: those of primarily European American descent at a research university and those of Native American ethnicity at an Inter-tribal Native American university to see if there were similarities or differences in their knowledge about and value of folk literature. Participants from each university were selected to complete a pre-post questionnaire and a post-interview about what they learned about folk literature in general and a particular country or culture\u27s stories as well. Analysis of the data showed similarity between the two sample populations on their knowledge of folk literature and understanding of other countries/cultures. There were differences in their projected application of the learned information. Implications for teacher educators are discussed

    Intertextual Episodes in Lectures: A Classification from the Perspective of Incidental Learning from Reading

    Get PDF
    In a parallel language environment it is important that teaching takes account of both the languages students are expected to work in. Lectures in the mother tongue need to offer access to textbooks in English and encouragement to read. This paper describes a preliminary study for an investigation of the extent to which they actually do so. A corpus of lectures in English for mainly L1 English students (from BASE and MICASE)  was examined for the types of reference to reading which occur, classified by their potential usefulness for access and encouragement. Such references were called ‘intertextual episodes’. Seven preliminary categories of intertextual episode were identified.  In some disciplines the text is the topic of the lecture rather than a medium for information on the topic, and this category was not pursued further. In the remaining six the text was a medium for information about the topic. Three of them involved management, of texts by the lecturer her/himself, of student writing, or of student reading. The remaining three involved reference to the content of the text either introducing it to students, reporting its content, or, really the most interesting category, relativizing it and thus potentially encouraging critical reading. Straightforward reporting that certain content was in the text at a certain point was the most common type, followed by management of student reading. Relativization was relatively infrequent. The exercise has provided us with categories which can be used for an experimental phase where the effect of different types of reference can be tested, and for observation of the references actually used in L1 lectures in a parallel-language environment

    Broadening conceptions of curriculum for young people : reports from three student - teachers on exchange

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    Research reports prepared by three Australian preservice teachers Paula Shaw, Chris Sharp and Scott McDonald undertaking their teacher education practicum in Canada, form the basis of this paper. The reports provide critical insights into three aspects of education for young people in both Canada and Australia. They also provide critical insight into the ways in which a practicum research project, along with the opportunities afforded through an international experience, enabled the preservice teachers to broaden their understanding of the curriculum for young people, of issues relevant to the diverse needs of young people, and of themselves and their priorities as teachers. The preservice teachers investigated three topics: attempts to reduce homophobia in schools; the presence or absence of Aboriginal content in the school curricula in British Columbia and Queensland; and “schools-within-schools” as a means to meet the needs of diverse student populations. Linda Farr Darling from the University of British Columbia provides a response to the three reports
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