15 research outputs found

    Microfluidics: reframing biological enquiry

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    The underlying physical properties of microfluidic tools have led to new biological insights through the development of microsystems that can manipulate, mimic and measure biology at a resolution that has not been possible with macroscale tools. Microsystems readily handle sub-microlitre volumes, precisely route predictable laminar fluid flows and match both perturbations and measurements to the length scales and timescales of biological systems. The advent of fabrication techniques that do not require highly specialized engineering facilities is fuelling the broad dissemination of microfluidic systems and their adaptation to specific biological questions. We describe how our understanding of molecular and cell biology is being and will continue to be advanced by precision microfluidic approaches and posit that microfluidic tools - in conjunction with advanced imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology approaches - will transform biology into a precision science

    A smart toilet for personalized health monitoring

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    3D Bioprinting of Oxygenated Cell‐Laden Gelatin Methacryloyl Constructs

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    Cell survival during the early stages of transplantation and before new blood vessels formation is a major challenge in translational applications of 3D bioprinted tissues. Supplementing oxygen (O-2) to transplanted cells via an O(2)generating source such as calcium peroxide (CPO) is an attractive approach to ensure cell viability. Calcium peroxide also produces calcium hydroxide that reduces the viscosity of bioinks, which is a limiting factor for bioprinting. Therefore, adapting this solution into 3D bioprinting is of significant importance. In this study, a gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) bioink that is optimized in terms of pH and viscosity is developed. The improved rheological properties lead to the production of a robust bioink suitable for 3D bioprinting and controlled O(2)release. In addition, O(2)release, bioprinting conditions, and mechanical performance of hydrogels having different CPO concentrations are characterized. As a proof of concept study, fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes are bioprinted using CPO containing GelMA bioink. Viability and metabolic activity of printed cells are checked after 7 days of culture under hypoxic condition. The results show that the addition of CPO improves the metabolic activity and viability of cells in bioprinted constructs under hypoxic condition

    3D Bioprinting of Oxygenated Cell-Laden Gelatin Methacryloyl Constructs

    No full text
    Cell survival during the early stages of transplantation and before new blood vessels formation is a major challenge in translational applications of 3D bioprinted tissues. Supplementing oxygen (O-2) to transplanted cells via an O(2)generating source such as calcium peroxide (CPO) is an attractive approach to ensure cell viability. Calcium peroxide also produces calcium hydroxide that reduces the viscosity of bioinks, which is a limiting factor for bioprinting. Therefore, adapting this solution into 3D bioprinting is of significant importance. In this study, a gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) bioink that is optimized in terms of pH and viscosity is developed. The improved rheological properties lead to the production of a robust bioink suitable for 3D bioprinting and controlled O(2)release. In addition, O(2)release, bioprinting conditions, and mechanical performance of hydrogels having different CPO concentrations are characterized. As a proof of concept study, fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes are bioprinted using CPO containing GelMA bioink. Viability and metabolic activity of printed cells are checked after 7 days of culture under hypoxic condition. The results show that the addition of CPO improves the metabolic activity and viability of cells in bioprinted constructs under hypoxic condition

    Polyphenols as Natural Antioxidants: Sources, Extraction and Applications in Food, Cosmetics and Drugs

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    Hydration-sensitive Gene Expression in Brain

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