1,554 research outputs found

    Photoemission studies of the near Fermi level spectral weight shifts in FeSe1-xTex superconductor

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    Our valence band photoelectron spectroscopic studies show a temperature dependent spectral weight transfer near the Fermi level in the Fe-based superconductor FeSe1-xTex. Using theoretical band structure calculations we have shown that the weight transfer is due to the temperature induced changes in the Fe(Se,Te)4 tetrahedra. These structural changes lead to shifts in the electron occupancy from the xz/yz and x2-y2 orbitals to the 3z2-r2 orbitals indicating a temperature induced crossover from a metallic state to an Orbital Selective Mott (OSM) Phase. Our study presents the observation of a temperature induced crossover to a low temperature OSM phase in the family of Fe chalcogenides.Comment: 10 pages, 4 figure

    Investigation of correlation effects in FeSe and FeTe by LDA + U method

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    Correlation effects are observed strong in Iron chalcogenides superconductors by experimental and theoretical investigations. We present a comparative study of the influence of Coulomb interaction and Hund's coupling in the electronic structure of FeSe and FeTe. The calculation is based on density functional theory (DFT) with local density approximation(LDA+U) framework employed in TB-LMTO ASA code. We found the correlation effects were orbital selective due to the strength of interorbital hybridization among different Fe-3d orbitals mediated via chalcogen (Se/Te-p) orbitals is different in both the compounds, however Coulomb interaction is screened significantly by Te-p bands in FeTe. Similarly the orbital section is different in both the compounds because of the difference in the chalcogen height

    Effects of strain on orbital ordering and magnetism at perovskite oxide interfaces: LaMnO3/SrMnO3

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    We study how strain affects orbital ordering and magnetism at the interface between SrMnO3 and LaMnO3 from density-functional calculations and interpret the basic results in terms of a three-site Mn-O-Mn model. Magnetic interaction between the Mn atoms is governed by a competition between the antiferromagnetic superexchange of the Mn t2g core spins and the ferromagnetic double exchange of the itinerant eg electrons. While the core electrons are relatively unaffected by the strain, the orbital character of the itinerant electron is strongly affected, which in turn causes a large change in the strength of the ferromagnetic double exchange. The epitaxial strain produces the tetragonal distortion of the MnO6 octahedron, splitting the Mn eg states into x2−y2 and 3z2−1 states, with the former being lower in energy, if the strain is tensile in the plane and opposite if the strain is compressive. For the case of the tensile strain, the resulting higher occupancy of the x2−y2 orbital enhances the in-plane ferromagnetic double exchange owing to the larger electron hopping in the plane, causing at the same time a reduction in the out-of-plane double exchange. This reduction is large enough to be overcome by antiferromagnetic superexchange, which wins to produce a net antiferromagnetic interaction between the out-of-plane Mn atoms. For the case of the in-plane compressive strain, the reverse happens, viz., that the higher occupancy of the 3z2−1 orbital results in the out-of-plane ferromagnetic interaction, while the in-plane magnetic interaction remains antiferromagnetic. Concrete density-functional results are presented for the (LaMnO3)1/(SrMnO3)1 and (LaMnO3)1/ (SrMnO3)3 superlattices for various strain conditions.This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER45818

    Electronic and magnetic structure of the (LaMnO3)2n/(SrMnO3)n superlattices

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    We study the magnetic structure of the (LaMnO3)2n/(SrMnO3)n superlattices from density-functional calculations. In agreement with the experiments, we find that the magnetism changes with the layer thickness n. The reason for the different magnetic structures is shown to be the varying potential barrier across the interface, which controls the leakage of the Mn-eg electrons from the LaMnO3 side to the SrMnO3 side. This in turn affects the interfacial magnetism via the carrier-mediated Zener double exchange. For the n=1 superlattice, the Mn-eg electrons are more or less spread over the entire lattice so that the magnetic behavior is similar to the equivalent alloy compound La2/3Sr1/3MnO3. For larger n, the eg electron transfer occurs mostly between the two layers adjacent to the interface, thus leaving the magnetism unchanged and bulklike away from the interface region.This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER45818. We thank J. W. Freeland for stimulating this work and for valuable discussions

    Electronic Phases and Phase Separation in the Hubbard-Holstein Model of a Polar Interface

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    http://arxiv.org/abs/1012.0889From a mean-field solution of the Hubbard-Holstein model, we show that a rich variety of different electronic phases can result at the interface between two polar materials such as LaAlO3_3/SrTiO3_3. Depending on the strengths of the various competing interactions, viz., the electronic kinetic energy, electron-phonon interaction, Coulomb energy, and electronic screening strength, the electrons could (i) either be strongly confined to the interface forming a 2D metallic or an insulating phase, (ii) spread deeper into the bulk making a 3D phase, or (iii) become localized at individual sites forming a Jahn-Teller polaronic phase. In the polaronic phase, the Coulomb interaction could lead to unpaired electrons resulting in magnetic Kondo centers. Under appropriate conditions, electronic phase separation may also occur resulting in the coexistence of metallic and insulating regions at the interface.This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER45818

    Polar catastrophe, electron leakage, and magnetic ordering at the LaMnO3/SrMnO3 interface

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    Electronic reconstruction at the polar interface LaMnO3/SrMnO3 (LMO/SMO) (100) resulting from the polar catastrophe is studied from a model Hamiltonian that includes the double and super exchange interactions, the Madelung potential, and the Jahn-Teller coupling terms relevant for the manganites. We show that the polar catastrophe, originating from the alternately charged LMO layers and neutral SMO layers, is quenched by the accumulation of an extra half electron per cell in the interface region as in the case of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. In addition, the Mn eg electrons leak out from the LMO side to the SMO side, the extent of the leakage being controlled by the interfacial potential barrier and the substrate induced epitaxial strain. The leaked electrons mediate a Zener double exchange, making the layers adjacent to the interface ferromagnetic, while the two bulk materials away from the interface retain their original type A or G antiferromagnetic structures. A half-metallic conduction band results at the interface, sandwiched by the two insulating bulks. We have also studied how the electron leakage and consequently the magnetic ordering are affected by the substrate induced epitaxial strain. Comparisons are made with the results of the density-functional calculations for the (LMO)6/(SMO)4 superlattice.This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER45818

    Magnetic and Orbital Order in LaMnO3 under Uniaxial Strain: A Model Study

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    The effect of uniaxial strain on electronic structure and magnetism in LaMnO3 is studied from a model Hamiltonian that illustrates the competition between the Jahn-Teller, super exchange, and double exchange interactions. We retain in our model the three main octahedral distortions (Q1,Q2, and Q3), which couple to the Mn (eg) electrons. Our results show the ground state to be a type A antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state for the unstrained case, consistent with experiments. With tensile strain (stretching along the c axis), the ground state changes into a ferromagnetic and eventually into a type G0 AFM structure, while with compressive strain, we find the type A switching into a type G structure. The orbital ordering, which displays the well known checkerboard x2−1/y2−1 structure for the unstrained case, retains more or less the same character for compressive strain, while changing into the z2 − 1 character for tensile strains. While Q1 and Q3 are fixed by the strain components "xx and "zz in our model, the magnitude of the in-plane distortion mode (Q2), which varies to minimize the total energy, slowly diminishes with tensile strain, completely disappearing as the FM state is entered. Within our model, the FM state is metallic, while the three AFM states are insulating.This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER45818

    Clustering in pb thin films on bromine-passivated si(1 1 1) surfaces

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    Thin Pb films, deposited on clean Si surfaces at room temperature (RT), show spectral broadening in ion backscattering spectra due to clustering of Pb, when annealed [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 190 (2002) 641]. In order to study the dynamics of clustering on bromine-passivated Si(1 1 1) substrates, Pb thin films (~1-3 nm) were deposited from a Knudsen cell under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Each film was deposited at RT and subsequently annealed at 100, 150 and 260 °C for about 4 h. Five Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements were made at different time intervals for each annealing . Analysis of RBS spectra of as-deposited and annealed Pb films, does not show any significant spectral broadening in annealed Pb films. However, island formation has been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy on a 100 °C-annealed sample. Clustering has apparently occurred in the as-deposited film due to lower surface free energy of the passivated substrate and further detectable growth in cluster height has not occurred in annealing

    Qualitative observation of reversible phase change in astrochemical ethanethiol ices using infrared spectroscopy

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    Here we report the first evidence for a reversible phase change in an ethanethiol ice prepared under astrochemical conditions. InfraRed (IR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the morphology of the ice using the Ssingle bondH stretching vibration, a characteristic vibration of thiol molecules. The deposited sample was able to switch between amorphous and crystalline phases repeatedly under temperature cycles between 10 K and 130 K with subsequent loss of molecules in every phase change. Such an effect is dependent upon the original thickness of the ice. Further work on quantitative analysis is to be carried out in due course whereas here we are reporting the first results obtained
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