93 research outputs found

    Surgeon volume and body mass index influence positive surgical margin risk after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: Results in 732 cases

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    Objectives: To evaluate clinicopathological and perioperative factors associated with the risk of focal and non-focal positive surgical margins (PSMs) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP).Patients and methods: The study was retrospective and excluded patients who were under androgen-deprivation therapy or had prior treatments. The population included: negative SM cases (control group), focal and non-focal PSM cases (study groups). PSMs were classified as focal when the linear extent of cancer invasion was <= 1 mm and non-focal when >1 mm. The independent association of factors with the risk of focal and non-focal PSMs was assessed by multinomial logistic regression.Results: In all, 732 patients underwent RARP, from January 2013 to December 2017. An extended pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 342 cases (46.7%). In all, 192 cases (26.3%) had PSMs, which were focal in 133 (18.2%) and non-focal in 59 (8.1%). Independent factors associated with the risk of focal PSMs were body mass index (odds ratio [OR] 0.914; P = 0.006), percentage of biopsy positive cores (BPC; OR 1.011; P = 0.015), pathological extracapsular extension (pathological tumour stage [pT]3a; OR 2.064; P = 0.016), and seminal vesicle invasion (pT3b; OR 2.150; P = 0.010). High surgeon volume was a protective factor in having focal PSM (OR 0.574; P = 0.006). Independent predictors of non-focal PSMs were BPC (OR 1,013; P = 0,044), pT3a (OR 4,832; P < 0.001), and pT3b (OR 5,153; P = 0.001).Conclusions: In high-volume centres features related to host, tumour and surgeon volume are factors that predict the risk of focal and non-focal PSMs after RARP

    PD45-01\u2003ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL ANAESTHETIC WOUNDS INFILTRATION AND ULTRASOUND TRANSVERSUS ABDOMINAL PLANE (US-TAP) BLOCK IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ROBOT-ASSISTED RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY: A DOUBLE-BLIND RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

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    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: To determinate bene\ufb01ts of the association of local anaesthetic wounds in\ufb01ltration and US-TAPblock with ropivacaine on postoperative pain, early recovery and hospital stay in patients undergoing robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). METHODS: The study is double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Our hypothesis was that the association of wound in\ufb01ltration and US-TAP block with Ropivacaine would decrease immediate postoperative pain and opioids use. Primary outcomes included postoperative pain and opioids demand during the hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were nausea/vomiting rate, stool passing time, use of pro-kinetics, length of hospital stay and 30-days readmission to the hospital for pain or other US-TAP-block related complications RESULTS: A total of 100 patients who underwent RARP were eligible for the analysis; 57 received the US-TAP block with 20 ml of 0.35% Ropivacaine (US-TAP-block group) and 43 did not receive USTAP block (no-US-TAP group). All the patients received the local wound anaesthetic in\ufb01ltration with 20 ml of 0.35% Ropivacaine. USTAP block group showed a decreased mean NRS (2.7vs1.8; p[0.04) and reduced use of opioid (8 vs 2; p[0.01) in the \ufb01rst 24 h. Moreover, we found a shorter mean LOS (4.7 vs 4.2; p[ 0.04) with a reduced use of pro-kinetics during the hospital stay (31 vs 12; p<0.001). No US-TAP-block related complications to were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Association of anaesthetic wound in\ufb01ltration and US-TAP block with Ropivacaine as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen can be safely offered to patients undergoing RARP and ePLND. It improves the immediate post-operative pain control, reducing opioids administration and is associated to a decreased use of pro-kinetics and shorter hospital stay

    High surgeon volume and positive surgical margins can predict the risk of biochemical recurrence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

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    Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether any clinical factors are independent predictors of positive surgical margins (PSM), and to assess the association of PSM and biochemical recurrence (BR) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Methods: The population included cases with negative surgical margins (control group) and patients with PSM (study group). Tumor grade was evaluated according to the International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) system. A logistic regression model assessed the independent association of factors with the risk of PSM. The risk of BR was assessed by Cox\u2019s multivariate proportional hazards. Results: A total of 732 consecutive patients were evaluated. Extend pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) was performed in 342 cases (46.7%). Overall, 192 cases (26.3%) had PSM. The risk of PSM was positively associated with the percentage of biopsy positive cores (BPC; odds ratio, OR = 1.012; p = 0.004), extracapsular extension (pT3a; OR=2.702; p < 0.0001), invasion of seminal vesicle (pT3b; OR = 2.889; p < 0.0001), but inversely with body mass index (OR = 0.936; p = 0.021), and high surgeon volume (OR = 0.607; p = 0.006). Independent clinical factors associated with the risk of BR were baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA; hazard ratio, HR = 1.064; p = 0.004), BPC (HR = 1.015; p = 0.027), ISUP biopsy grade group (BGG) 2/3 (HR = 2.966; p = 0.003), and BGG 4/5 (HR = 3.122; p = 0.022). Pathologic factors associated with the risk of BR were ISUP group 4/5 (HR = 3.257; p = 0.001), pT3b (HR = 2.900; p = 0.003), and PSM (HR = 2.096; p = 0.045). Conclusions: In our cohort, features related to host, tumor, and surgeon volume are associated with the risk of PSM, which is also an independent parameter predicting BR after RARP. The surgical volume of the operating surgeon is an independent factor that decreases the risk of PSM, and, as such, the risk of BR

    Prostate volume index and prostatic chronic inflammation have an effect on tumor load at baseline random biopsies in patients with normal DRE and PSA values less than 10\u2009ng/ml: results of 564 consecutive cases

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    Background: To assess the association of prostate volume index (PVI), defined as the ratio of the central transition zone volume (CTZV) to the peripheral zone volume (PZV), and prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) as predictors of prostate cancer (PCA) load in patients presenting with normal digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <= 10 ng/ml at baseline random biopsies. Methods: Parameters evaluated included age, PSA, total prostate volume (TPV), PSA density (PSAD), PVI and PCI. All patients underwent 14 core transperineal randomized biopsies. We considered small and high PCA load patients with no more than three (limited tumor load) and greater than three (extensive tumor load) positive biopsy cores, respectively. The association of factors with the risk of PCA was evaluated by logistic regression analysis, utilizing different multivariate models. Results: 564 Caucasian patients were included. PCA and PCI were detected in 242 (42.9%) and 129 (22.9%) cases, respectively. On multivariate analysis, PVI and PCI were independent predictors of the risk of detecting limited or extensive tumor load. The risk of detecting extensive tumor load at baseline biopsies was increased by PSAD above the median and third quartile as well as PVI <= 1 [odds ratio (OR)=1.971] but decreased by PCI (OR=0.185; 95% CI: 0.088-0.388). Conclusions: Higher PVI and the presence of PCI predicted decreased PCA risk in patients presenting with normal DRE, and a PSA <= 10 ng/ml at baseline random biopsy. In this subset of patients, a PVI <= or >1 is able to differentiate patients with PCA or PCI

    Anomalous transport in disordered fracture networks: Spatial Markov model for dispersion with variable injection modes

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    We investigate tracer transport on random discrete fracture networks that are characterized by the statistics of the fracture geometry and hydraulic conductivity. While it is well known that tracer transport through fractured media can be anomalous and particle injection modes can have major impact on dispersion, the incorporation of injection modes into effective transport modeling has remained an open issue. The fundamental reason behind this challenge is that-even if the Eulerian fluid velocity is steady-the Lagrangian velocity distribution experienced by tracer particles evolves with time from its initial distribution, which is dictated by the injection mode, to a stationary velocity distribution. We quantify this evolution by a Markov model for particle velocities that are equidistantly sampled along trajectories. This stochastic approach allows for the systematic incorporation of the initial velocity distribution and quantifies the interplay between velocity distribution and spatial and temporal correlation. The proposed spatial Markov model is characterized by the initial velocity distribution, which is determined by the particle injection mode, the stationary Lagrangian velocity distribution, which is derived from the Eulerian velocity distribution, and the spatial velocity correlation length, which is related to the characteristic fracture length. This effective model leads to a time-domain random walk for the evolution of particle positions and velocities, whose joint distribution follows a Boltzmann equation. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed model can successfully predict anomalous transport through discrete fracture networks with different levels of heterogeneity and arbitrary tracer injection modes. ┬ę 2017 Elsevier Ltd.PKK and SL acknowledge a grant (16AWMP- B066761-04) from the AWMP Program funded by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of the Korean government and the support from Future Research Program (2E27030) funded by the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). PKK and RJ acknowledge a MISTI Global Seed Funds award. MD acknowledges the support of the European Research Council (ERC) through the project MHetScale (617511). TLB acknowledges the support of European Research Council (ERC) through the project Re- activeFronts (648377). RJ acknowledges the support of the US Department of Energy through a DOE Early Career Award (grant DE-SC0009286). The data to reproduce the work can be obtained from the corresponding author.N

    A many-analysts approach to the relation between religiosity and well-being

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    The relation between religiosity and well-being is one of the most researched topics in the psychology of religion, yet the directionality and robustness of the effect remains debated. Here, we adopted a many-analysts approach to assess the robustness of this relation based on a new cross-cultural dataset (N=10,535 participants from 24 countries). We recruited 120 analysis teams to investigate (1) whether religious people self-report higher well-being, and (2) whether the relation between religiosity and self-reported well-being depends on perceived cultural norms of religion (i.e., whether it is considered normal and desirable to be religious in a given country). In a two-stage procedure, the teams first created an analysis plan and then executed their planned analysis on the data. For the first research question, all but 3 teams reported positive effect sizes with credible/confidence intervals excluding zero (median reported ╬▓=0.120). For the second research question, this was the case for 65% of the teams (median reported ╬▓=0.039). While most teams applied (multilevel) linear regression models, there was considerable variability in the choice of items used to construct the independent variables, the dependent variable, and the included covariates

    A Many-analysts Approach to the Relation Between Religiosity and Well-being

    Get PDF
    The relation between religiosity and well-being is one of the most researched topics in the psychology of religion, yet the directionality and robustness of the effect remains debated. Here, we adopted a many-analysts approach to assess the robustness of this relation based on a new cross-cultural dataset (N = 10, 535 participants from 24 countries). We recruited 120 analysis teams to investigate (1) whether religious people self-report higher well-being, and (2) whether the relation between religiosity and self-reported well-being depends on perceived cultural norms of religion (i.e., whether it is considered normal and desirable to be religious in a given country). In a two-stage procedure, the teams first created an analysis plan and then executed their planned analysis on the data. For the first research question, all but 3 teams reported positive effect sizes with credible/confidence intervals excluding zero (median reported ╬▓ = 0.120). For the second research question, this was the case for 65% of the teams (median reported ╬▓ = 0.039). While most teams applied (multilevel) linear regression models, there was considerable variability in the choice of items used to construct the independent variables, the dependent variable, and the included covariates
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