415 research outputs found

    Model Checking Social Network Models

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    A social network service is a platform to build social relations among people sharing similar interests and activities. The underlying structure of a social networks service is the social graph, where nodes represent users and the arcs represent the users' social links and other kind of connections. One important concern in social networks is privacy: what others are (not) allowed to know about us. The "logic of knowledge" (epistemic logic) is thus a good formalism to define, and reason about, privacy policies. In this paper we consider the problem of verifying knowledge properties over social network models (SNMs), that is social graphs enriched with knowledge bases containing the information that the users know. More concretely, our contributions are: i) We prove that the model checking problem for epistemic properties over SNMs is decidable; ii) We prove that a number of properties of knowledge that are sound w.r.t. Kripke models are also sound w.r.t. SNMs; iii) We give a satisfaction-preserving encoding of SNMs into canonical Kripke models, and we also characterise which Kripke models may be translated into SNMs; iv) We show that, for SNMs, the model checking problem is cheaper than the one based on standard Kripke models. Finally, we have developed a proof-of-concept implementation of the model-checking algorithm for SNMs.Comment: In Proceedings GandALF 2017, arXiv:1709.0176

    Extracting Formal Models from Normative Texts

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    We are concerned with the analysis of normative texts - documents based on the deontic notions of obligation, permission, and prohibition. Our goal is to make queries about these notions and verify that a text satisfies certain properties concerning causality of actions and timing constraints. This requires taking the original text and building a representation (model) of it in a formal language, in our case the C-O Diagram formalism. We present an experimental, semi-automatic aid that helps to bridge the gap between a normative text in natural language and its C-O Diagram representation. Our approach consists of using dependency structures obtained from the state-of-the-art Stanford Parser, and applying our own rules and heuristics in order to extract the relevant components. The result is a tabular data structure where each sentence is split into suitable fields, which can then be converted into a C-O Diagram. The process is not fully automatic however, and some post-editing is generally required of the user. We apply our tool and perform experiments on documents from different domains, and report an initial evaluation of the accuracy and feasibility of our approach.Comment: Extended version of conference paper at the 21st International Conference on Applications of Natural Language to Information Systems (NLDB 2016). arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:1607.0148

    FLACOS’08 Workshop proceedings

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    The 2nd Workshop on Formal Languages and Analysis of Contract-Oriented Software (FLACOS’08) is held in Malta. The aim of the workshop is to bring together researchers and practitioners working on language-based solutions to contract-oriented software development. The workshop is partially funded by the Nordunet3 project “COSoDIS” (Contract-Oriented Software Development for Internet Services) and it attracted 25 participants. The program consists of 4 regular papers and 10 invited participant presentations

    Relaxing goodness is still good for SPDIs

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    Polygonal hybrid systems (SPDIs) are planar hybrid systems, whose dynamics are defined in terms of constant differential inclusions, one for each of a number of polygonal regions partitioning the plane. The reachability problem for SPDIs is known to be decidable, but depends on the goodness assumption — which states that the dynamics do not allow a trajectory to both enter and leave a region through the same edge. In this paper we extend the decidability result to generalised SPDIs (GSPDI), SPDIs not satisfying the goodness property, and give an algorithmic solution to decide reachability of such systems.peer-reviewe

    Relaxing goodness is still good for SPDIs

    Get PDF
    Polygonal hybrid systems (SPDIs) are planar hybrid systems, whose dynamics are defined in terms of constant differential inclusions, one for each of a number of polygonal regions partitioning the plane. The reachability problem for SPDIs is known to be decidable, but depends on the goodness assumption — which states that the dynamics do not allow a trajectory to both enter and leave a region through the same edge. In this paper we extend the decidability result to generalised SPDIs (GSPDI), SPDIs not satisfying the goodness property, and give an algorithmic solution to decide reachability of such systems.peer-reviewe

    Static analysis of SPDIs for state-space reduction

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    Polygonal hybrid systems (SPDI) are a subclass of planar hybrid automata which can be represented by piecewise constant differential inclusions. The reachability problem as well as the computation of certain objects of the phase portrait, namely the viability, controllability and invariance kernels, for such systems is decidable. In this paper we show how to compute another object of an SPDI phase portrait, namely semi-separatrix curves and show how the phase portrait can be used for reducing the state-space for optimizing the reachability analysis.peer-reviewe
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