70 research outputs found

    Detection of Motor Cerebral Activity After Median Nerve Stimulation During General Anesthesia (STIM-MOTANA): Protocol for a Prospective Interventional Study

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    International audienceBackground Accidental awareness during general anesthesia (AAGA) is defined as an unexpected awareness of the patient during general anesthesia. This phenomenon occurs in 1%-2% of high-risk practice patients and can cause physical suffering and psychological after-effects, called posttraumatic stress disorder. In fact, no monitoring techniques are satisfactory enough to effectively prevent AAGA; therefore, new alternatives are needed. Because the first reflex for a patient during an AAGA is to move, but cannot do so because of the neuromuscular blockers, we believe that it is possible to design a brain-computer interface (BCI) based on the detection of movement intention to warn the anesthetist. To do this, we propose to describe and detect the changes in terms of motor cortex oscillations during general anesthesia with propofol, while a median nerve stimulation is performed. We believe that our results could enable the design of a BCI based on median nerve stimulation, which could prevent AAGA. Objective To our knowledge, no published studies have investigated the detection of electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns in relation to peripheral nerve stimulation over the sensorimotor cortex during general anesthesia. The main objective of this study is to describe the changes in terms of event-related desynchronization and event-related synchronization modulations, in the EEG signal over the motor cortex during general anesthesia with propofol while a median nerve stimulation is performed. Methods STIM-MOTANA is an interventional and prospective study conducted with patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia, involving EEG measurements and median nerve stimulation at two different times: (1) when the patient is awake before surgery (2) and under general anesthesia. A total of 30 patients will receive surgery under complete intravenous anesthesia with a target-controlled infusion pump of propofol. Results The changes in event-related desynchronization and event-related synchronization during median nerve stimulation according to the various propofol concentrations for 30 patients will be analyzed. In addition, we will apply 4 different offline machine learning algorithms to detect the median nerve stimulation at the cerebral level. Recruitment began in December 2022. Data collection is expected to conclude in June 2024. Conclusions STIM-MOTANA will be the first protocol to investigate median nerve stimulation cerebral motor effect during general anesthesia for the detection of intraoperative awareness. Based on strong practical and theoretical scientific reasoning from our previous studies, our innovative median nerve stimulation–based BCI would provide a way to detect intraoperative awareness during general anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT05272202; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05272202 International Registered Report Identifier (IRRID) PRR1-10.2196/4387

    Rationale and design of the PeriOperative ISchemic Evaluation-3 (POISE-3): a randomized controlled trial evaluating tranexamic acid and a strategy to minimize hypotension in noncardiac surgery

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    Background For patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, bleeding and hypotension are frequent and associated with increased mortality and cardiovascular complications. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic agent with the potential to reduce surgical bleeding; however, there is uncertainty about its efficacy and safety in noncardiac surgery. Although usual perioperative care is commonly consistent with a hypertension-avoidance strategy (i.e., most patients continue their antihypertensive medications throughout the perioperative period and intraoperative mean arterial pressures of 60 mmHg are commonly accepted), a hypotension-avoidance strategy may improve perioperative outcomes. Methods The PeriOperative Ischemic Evaluation (POISE)-3 Trial is a large international randomized controlled trial designed to determine if TXA is superior to placebo for the composite outcome of life-threatening, major, and critical organ bleeding, and non-inferior to placebo for the occurrence of major arterial and venous thrombotic events, at 30 days after randomization. Using a partial factorial design, POISE-3 will additionally determine the effect of a hypotension-avoidance strategy versus a hypertension-avoidance strategy on the risk of major cardiovascular events, at 30 days after randomization. The target sample size is 10,000 participants. Patients ≥45 years of age undergoing noncardiac surgery, with or at risk of cardiovascular and bleeding complications, are randomized to receive a TXA 1 g intravenous bolus or matching placebo at the start and at the end of surgery. Patients, health care providers, data collectors, outcome adjudicators, and investigators are blinded to the treatment allocation. Patients on ≥ 1 chronic antihypertensive medication are also randomized to either of the two blood pressure management strategies, which differ in the management of patient antihypertensive medications on the morning of surgery and on the first 2 days after surgery, and in the target mean arterial pressure during surgery. Outcome adjudicators are blinded to the blood pressure treatment allocation. Patients are followed up at 30 days and 1 year after randomization. Discussion Bleeding and hypotension in noncardiac surgery are common and have a substantial impact on patient prognosis. The POISE-3 trial will evaluate two interventions to determine their impact on bleeding, cardiovascular complications, and mortality. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03505723. Registered on 23 April 2018

    Making the invisible apparent: 100-Hz, 5-s tetanic stimulation to detect residual paralysis

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    SCOPUS: ed.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe

    Neuromuskuläre Restblockade.

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    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishe

    Routine neuromuscular monitoring before succinylcholine. Comment on Br J Anaesth 2020; 125: 629–36

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    SCOPUS: le.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe

    Incorrect shunt placement due to anatomic variations of the aortic arch during carotid endarterectomy: A rare cause of perioperative ischemia? [55]

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    SCOPUS: le.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe

    Hybridoperationssaal

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    A hybrid suite is an operating theater with imaging equipment equivalent to that used in an angiography suite with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They are often situated outside the operating room area and typically serve as multifunctional rooms designed to support a variety of catheter-based endovascular procedures and open surgery to be performed in the same location. The possibility to perform these in the same location facilitates the combination of both approaches to so-called hybrid procedures. Typical clinical applications of hybrid suites are cardiac, thoracic and vascular surgery, neurosurgery and neuroradiology, as well as orthopedics and traumatology. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is significantly less invasive than a classical approach by open surgery. Patients older than 75 years with relevant comorbidities benefit most from the minimally invasive interventional approach. There has been a paradigm shift in the management of vascular diseases from open surgical repair to new percutaneous endovascular interventions with good early outcomes. Of particular interest in this context is the ability to block the part of the aorta proximal to the aneurysm with a catheter-based dilatation balloon. Progress in image fusion technology and intraoperative navigation has led to an increased acceptance of hybrid suites in orthopedics and traumatology. The complex care of high-risk patients most often outside the operating theater area is a challenge for the anesthesia team. This demands meticulous planning on behalf of the anesthesiologist to ensure an appropriate and safe strategy for anesthesia, intraoperative monitoring, vascular access and the need for additional equipment. A thorough understanding of the complexity of procedures is vital and a series of questions must be addressed: what is needed to safely administer anesthesia in this environment? What additional resources would be needed for an emergency situation? Is the patient being kept safe from radiation hazards? Moreover, logistics may become an issue as the hybrid suite is most often delocalized. In addition, many procedures realized in a hybrid suite require a multidisciplinary approach and therefore teamwork and professional communication are mandatory. Anesthesiologists need to have an integral role in the hybrid suite team, understanding and anticipating the risks for patients and leading the organization of workflow. The challenge in anesthesia is to ensure that when patients are taken to these complex environments the resources available enable high standards of care to be provided. With future developments in imaging technology combined with more powerful hardware and software, a far greater integration of all these imaging and navigation technologies will be seen in future operating rooms. Finally, patients are becoming more aware of medical developments via the world wide web and increasingly request what they consider to be state of the art treatment.SCOPUS: re.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe

    A modified train-of-four ratio to assess recovery from depolarizing neuromuscular blockade after succinylcholine, a prospective observational study

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    Succinylcholine is still used in clinical practice. Its duration is highly variable and neuromuscular monitoring is recommended to assess its recovery. Unfortunately, depolarizing neuromuscular block cannot be evaluated by train-of-four (TOF) as no fade occurs. Only single twitch (ST) allows to monitor depolarizing block. The TOFScan monitor proposes a modified TOF ratio (T4/Tref) not referring to fade within a TOF series. We hypothesized that the T4/Tref allows to assess recovery from succinylcholine. This observational study aims to compare recovery from depolarizing block simultaneously assessed with T4/Tref and ST. After Ethics Committee approval and written informed consent 45 patients receiving a single dose of succinylcholine were included. ST recovery, measured with TOF-Watch SX, and T4/Tref recovery, measured by TOFScan, were assessed simultaneously. Difference between measurements was compared using Mann–Whitney U test and overall concordance with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC was 0.85 [95% CI 0.82–0.87]. The first T4/Tref ratio ≥ 90% was 97% [95% CI 93–101%] the corresponding ST value was 91% [95% CI 87–97%]. The first T4/Tref ratio ≥ 100% was 103% [95% CI 102–107%], the corresponding ST value was 104% [95% CI 100–106%]; median [95% confidence interval of the median]. Time to recovery to 90% and 100% of baseline did not differ between ST or T4/Tref. It was10.0 [8.0–13.0] min vs 10.0 [8.0–12.0] min, P = 0.307 and 10.0 [9.0–15.0] min vs 10.0 [8.0–15.0] min, P = 0.546; respectively; median [IQR]. Agreement between both parameters was excellent. The T4/Tref can be used accurately to measure recovery from depolarizing neuromuscular block.SCOPUS: ar.jinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishe
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