7 research outputs found

    Anthropometric measurements, nutritional status and body composition in children with cystic fibrosis – the prospective study

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    Background: Cystic fibrosis(CF),despite much progress in therapy, remains the disease which affects nutrition. Nutrition is an important prognostic factor of the outcome of the disease. We want to evaluate physical development, nutrition and body composition in CF children. Material and methods: 75 children diagnosed with CF (9 months to 18 years old) were included into the study. 33 healthy children (9 months to 18 years old) constituted the control group. The study consisted of 2 stages. In the first the differences between groups were investigated. The second, took place a year later. At each time point the following measurements were performed: height, body mass, skin fold, arm circumference; BMI, FFM%, FM% and Frisancho index. FFM(fat free mass), FM(fat mass), muscle mass, TBW(total body water) were evaluated by mans of BIA(bioimpedance). Results: CF children were shorter than healthy children. Stunting affected 18,67% of CF patients at first examination and 21,6% a year later. Underweight was diagnosed in 28% of patients at the beginning and in 41.2% a year after. Underweight was the result of both little FM and scarce muscle mass. Conclusions: Many children with cystic fibrosis suffers from short stature and underweight, which progresses within time. FFM decreases with the disease progres

    Cystic fibrosis is a risk factor for celiac disease

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    Background: The coexistence of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported. To our knowledge there is no study directly comparing the incidence of CD in CF patients to that in the general population at the same time. There is no published data on genetic predisposition to CD in CF patients either. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the genetic predisposition to CD and its incidence in CF patients comparing it to data from the general population. Patients and methods: Two hundred eighty-two CF patients were enrolled in the study. In 230 CF patients the genetic predisposition to CD (the presence of HLA-DQ2/ DQ8) was assessed. In all CF patients, serological screening for CD was conducted. In patients with positive antiendomysial antibodies (EMA) gastroduenoscopy was offered. Intestinal histology was classified according to modified Marsh criteria. The results of serological CD screening in 3235 Polish schoolchildren and HLA-DQ typing in 200 healthy subjects (HS) were used for comparison. Results: Positive EMA was found in 2.84% of the studied CF patients. The incidence of proven CD was 2.13%. The incidence of CD as well as positive serological screening were significantly more frequent in the CF group than in the general population. The frequency of CD-related HLA-DQ alleles in CF and HS did not differ. Conclusions: Genetic predisposition to celiac disease in cystic fibrosis patients is similar to that of the general population. However, our results suggest that cystic fibrosis is a risk factor for celiac disease development

    on-line at: www.actabp.pl Cystic fibrosis is a risk factor for celiac disease

    No full text
    Background: The coexistence of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported. To our knowledge there is no study directly comparing the incidence of CD in CF patients to that in the general population at the same time. There is no published data on genetic predisposition to CD in CF patients either. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the genetic predisposition to CD and its incidence in CF patients comparing it to data from the general population. Patients and methods: Two hundred eighty-two CF patients were enrolled in the study. In 230 CF patients the genetic predisposition to CD (the presence of HLA-DQ2 / DQ8) was assessed. In all CF patients, serological screening for CD was conducted. In patients with positive antiendomysial antibodies (EMA) gastroduenoscopy was offered. Intestinal histology was classified according to modified Marsh criteria. The results of serological CD screenin

    Leukocyte Telomere Length Is Not Reduced in Children and Adults with Cystic Fibrosis but Associates with Clinical Characteristics—A Cross-Sectional Study

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    We hypothezied that telomere length is considerably altered in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients compared to healthy subjects (HS), and that leukocyte telomere length variation reflects the severity of CF. Relative telomere length (RTL) was assessed by qPCR in 70 children aged 5–10 (34 CF; 36 HS) and 114 adults aged 18–45 (53 CF; 61 HS). Telomere length was similar in CF and HS (median (interquartile range): 0.799 (0.686–0.950) vs. 0.831 (0.707–0.986); p = 0.5283) both in children and adults. In adults, women had longer telomeres than men (0.805 (0.715–0.931) vs. 0.703 (0.574–0.790); p = 0.0002). Patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids had a shorter RTL compared to those without steroid therapy (0.765 (0.664–0.910) vs. 0.943 (0.813–1.191); p = 0.0007) and this finding remained significant after adjusting for gender, age, BMI, and child/adult status (p = 0.0003). Shorter telomeres were independently associated with the presence of comorbidities (0.763 (0.643–0.905) vs. 0.950 (0.783–1.130); p = 0.0006) and antibiotic treatment at the moment of blood sampling (0.762 (0.648–0.908) vs. 0.832 (0.748–1.129); p = 0.0172). RTL correlated with number of multiple-day hospitalizations (rho = −0.251; p = 0.0239), as well as number of hospitalization days (rho = −0.279; p = 0.0113). Leukocyte RTL in children and adults with CF was not shorter than in healthy controls, and did not seem to have any potential as a predictor of CF survival. However, it inversely associated with the investigated clinical characteristics

    Leukocyte telomere length is not reduced in children and adults with cystic fibrosis but associates with clinical characteristics:a cross-sectional study

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    Abstract We hypothezied that telomere length is considerably altered in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients compared to healthy subjects (HS), and that leukocyte telomere length variation reflects the severity of CF. Relative telomere length (RTL) was assessed by qPCR in 70 children aged 5–10 (34 CF; 36 HS) and 114 adults aged 18–45 (53 CF; 61 HS). Telomere length was similar in CF and HS (median (interquartile range): 0.799 (0.686–0.950) vs. 0.831 (0.707–0.986); p = 0.5283) both in children and adults. In adults, women had longer telomeres than men (0.805 (0.715–0.931) vs. 0.703 (0.574–0.790); p = 0.0002). Patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids had a shorter RTL compared to those without steroid therapy (0.765 (0.664–0.910) vs. 0.943 (0.813–1.191); p = 0.0007) and this finding remained significant after adjusting for gender, age, BMI, and child/adult status (p = 0.0003). Shorter telomeres were independently associated with the presence of comorbidities (0.763 (0.643–0.905) vs. 0.950 (0.783–1.130); p = 0.0006) and antibiotic treatment at the moment of blood sampling (0.762 (0.648–0.908) vs. 0.832 (0.748–1.129); p = 0.0172). RTL correlated with number of multiple-day hospitalizations (rho = −0.251; p = 0.0239), as well as number of hospitalization days (rho = −0.279; p = 0.0113). Leukocyte RTL in children and adults with CF was not shorter than in healthy controls, and did not seem to have any potential as a predictor of CF survival. However, it inversely associated with the investigated clinical characteristics

    Mild CFTR mutations and genetic predisposition to lactase persistence in cystic fibrosis

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    Taking into account the reported incidence of hypolactasia in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the possible impact of milk products on nutritional status we aimed to assess the genetic predisposition to adult-type hypolactasia (ATH) and its incidence in CF. Single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) was assessed in 289 CF patients. In subject with −13910C/C genotype (C/C) predisposing to ATH, hydrogen-methane breath test (BT) with lactose loading was conducted and clinical symptoms typical for lactose malabsorption were assessed. The percentage of CF patients with C/C was similar to that observed in healthy subjects (HS) (31.5 vs 32.5% ). Eleven out of 52 (24.5%) CF C/C patients had abnormal BT results. The recalculated frequency of lactose malabsorption was similar for the entire CF and HS populations (6.9 vs 7.2%). Similarly as in the control group, few CF patients have identified and linked to lactose consumption clinical symptoms. The frequency of LCT polymorphic variants in CF patients having and not having severe mutations of CFTR gene showed significant differences. The C allele was more frequent in homozygotes of the severe mutations than in patients carrying at least one mild/unknown mutation (P<0.0028) and in patients with at least one mild mutation (P<0.0377). In conclusion, CF patients carrying mild CFTR mutations seem to have lower genetic predisposition to ATH. Lactose malabsorption due to ATH in CF is not more frequent than in the general population. Symptomatic assessment of lactose malabsorption in CF is not reliable
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