569 research outputs found

    Addictive behavior in cinema demand: evidence from Korea

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    It is intuitively plausible that the demand for cinema services may be partly driven by addiction or habit. Yet there is almost no empirical literature which tests for whether cinema demand is addictive. We estimate addiction models for cinema demand using Korean time series data from 1963 to 2004. Our estimation results indicate that (i) addictive behavior characterizes the demand for cinema services, (ii) this behavior is rational, and (iii) habit is one of most important determinants of cinema demand. Our results also reveal that cinema attendance is generally insensitive to admission price and unrelated to income.Cinema demand, rational addiction, myopic addiction, two-stages least squares, time-series analysis

    Does the Solow Residual for Korea Reflect Pure Technology Shocks?

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    This study investigates the relationship between the measured Solow residual and demand side variables for the Korean economy. The measured Solow residuals are shown to be Granger-caused by some demand side variables such as exports, M1, and government expenditure. A vector error correction model is constructed to investigate dynamic relation between these demand side variables and the Solow residual. Impulse response functions shows that the measured Solow residual moves pro-cyclically with the demand shocks, and that the forecast error variance of the measured Solow residual is mostly explained by past innovations of these demand side variablesSolow residual, Productivity shock, Vector error correction model

    The Productivity Debate of East Asia Revisited: A Stochastic Frontier Approach

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    This paper applies a stochastic frontier production model to the data from Penn World Table’s 49 countries over the period 1965-1990, to decompose total factor productivity growth into technical change and technical efficiency change. Empirical results show East Asian countries led the whole world in productivity growth, mainly because their technical efficiency gain was so much faster than that of other countries. East Asian countries also registered rapid technical change, which was comparable to that of the G6 countries after the late 1980s. The results provide evidence that negate the hypothesis that East Asian growth was mostly input-driven and unsustainable.East Asian Growth, stochastic frontier production model, total factor productivity, technical progress, technical efficiency

    Imports, exports, and total factor productivity in Korea

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