46 research outputs found

    Contemporary attitudes to traditional facial ta moko: A working paper

    Get PDF
    Until it came under serious attack from nineteenth century missionaries, ta moko was an integral part of traditional Maori society. Facial moko conveyed important information about identity, whakapapa and status. The process of receiving a moko was tapu and highly regulated. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of Maori receiving ta moko. Moko have been seen as a symbol of Maori pride and identity and have often been associated with political activism. This study set out to investigate the contemporary meaning of ta moko, the reactions wearers encounter from others and the ways wearers cope with those reactions. Three case studies are presented. These show that the issues of personal identity and whakapapa were central to the meaning wearers attached to their moko. Receiving a moko was often associated with significant personal changes and an increased political commitment to Maori self determination. On the whole, positive reactions were more common than negative reactions but wearers did find themselves subjected to racist and antagonistic responses. Wearing moko was also reported to mean that others, particularly other Maori, placed certain expectations on the wearer, notably to be fluent in te reo and to be able to exercise leadership. Participants considered that there was a need for education about the significance of ta moko and recommended that those contemplating receiving a moko ensure that they are reasonably fluent in te reo

    Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2004

    Get PDF
    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2004. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community

    Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2009

    Get PDF
    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2009. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community

    Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2006

    Get PDF
    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2006. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community

    An evaluation of the effectiveness of social equity strategies for Maori students in the School of Science and Technology

    Get PDF
    In 1991 the School of Science and Technology (SOSAT) at the University of Waikato had a very low participation rate of Maori and students from other non-dominant ethnic groups. This situation was serious enough to concerned the then Dean of the School and strategies were developed to change this situation. Four major strategies are used to encourage, support and retain Maori students to successfully pursue and complete a degree in Science. They are: the Te Putahi o te Manawa programme - a mentoring programme; a scholarship and grant writing strategy (in particular assistance with Tuapapa Putaiao Maori Fellowships(TPMFs) administered by FRST); school visits; and field trips with secondary schools in the Waikato region that have a high proportion of Maori students. The Maori & Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) was contracted by Gary Bramley of the Equity Office of the SOSAT to conduct this evaluation. Evaluative information was gathered through administering questionnaires, completing key informant interviews, and completing focus group interviews. In this evaluation we sought to determine the effectiveness of the social equity strategies for Maori students in the SOSAT at the University of Waikato

    Spill-over of sustainability values and practices - a psychology PhD thesis proposal

    Get PDF
    The following presentation relates to my proposed PhD topic. As an audience you’re probably reading the title and wondering what relevance my topic has to the symposium theme Claiming Spaces. My immediate response is ‘nothing’. Nada, zilch, kore. As a ‘fill-in’ speaker for a presenter unable to be here, I’m reminded that despite my topics irregularity in the programme, I claim a space as both a psychologist and Maori person seeking to work with in the field of sustainability and conservation. Psychologists and Maori are interested in more than mental health and clinical investigation. We are interested in how the world goes around and seek to claim a space here too. So, this symposium and my participation DOES have relevance and I’d like to acknowledge those who remind me so. Let’s take a peep into my world for the next 3 years

    Māori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2011

    Get PDF
    Annual report of the Māori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2011. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community

    Waikirikiri Marae: Shared experiences of the wharemate

    Get PDF
    In Te Urewera, wharemate (shelters in which the deceased receive their final farewells) have traditionally been temporary structures. In the 1980s, a new practice was introduced in the Ruātoki valley with the erection of permanent wharemate facilities. One was erected at Waikirikiri marae (tribal meeting grounds and associated buildings) in 1989. Knowledge and discussion regarding wharemate at Waikirikiri marae have changed over the years, and a whole generation has not been fortunate enough to experience tikanga (correct procedures, customary practices) that prevailed prior to the introduction of the permanent wharemate building that is there today. These changes are recorded in this paper through the shared stories of three kaumātua (elders) from Waikirikiri. This paper is a summary of Hare Rua’s thesis study, the data for which was collected in 2009. This work forms part of the Tangi Research Programme, a collaboration between the School of Māori and Pacific Development and the Māori and Psychology Research Unit at The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

    Different coloured tears: Dual cultural identity and Tangihanga

    Get PDF
    Although whānau/family that are configured by both Pākehā and Māori identities number significantly within New Zealand, there has been little or no attention paid to the ways in which these identities influence the bereavement processes that will inevitably impact upon the lives of these whānau/family. The present study explored the experiences of an individual, whose whānau/family included two life ways: Māori and Pākehā. Of specific focus was the ways in which these identities influenced his bereavement subsequent to the death of his beloved wife, who was of Māori descent. One elderly male Pākehā participant was interviewed, using an open ended narrative approach. The interview was semi-structured around five broad themes, but the focus was upon the participant’s experiences and his preference in expressing these. The data analysis utilised a thematic process which allowed the participant’s experiences to determine the emergent themes. The results depicted the diversity of issues that may be raised for dual cultural whānau/family within bereavement processes. Two central themes are discussed in relation to intercultural conflict and the eventual resolution that was created. Decision-making processes, cultural and language differences played significant roles within the conflict and exclusion experienced by the participant. Communication and compromise provided resolution to the prior conflicts experienced. This created positive and unexpected outcomes which resulted in increased understandings and the strengthening of links between the participant, his whānau/family and his wife’s marae

    Tūhoe on the move: Regional mobility

    Get PDF
    Academic interest in geographic mobility of indigenous peoples has increased in recent years with a corresponding growth in the literature relating to Māori mobility more specifically. With this greater acknowledgement of Māori issues has also come an awareness of the need for iwi-specific research because of the diversity within and between Māori and iwi. The present research contributes to a larger project exploring Tūhoe regional mobility. In this paper, we analyse published data and unpublished census data from 2001 that relate specifically to Tūhoe regional mobility and the relationship between mobility and language. Region of residence in 1996 and 2001 were analysed in relation to age, sex, and broad language groups. Overall, this analysis found important and diverse relationships between age, sex, language, and region of residence in New Zealand among Māori who identify as Tūhoe. For example, patterns of mobility for different age groups and sex had some similarities with other research, such as a higher proportion of “stayers” in older age groups, but differences were also found, such as higher proportions of “movers” among females in some age groups. Interestingly, we found that language between “movers” and “stayers” differed depending on the region of residence. A greater proportion of “movers” were able to converse in Māori in Auckland and the Waikato, but a slightly greater proportion of “stayers” could converse in Māori in the Hawke’s Bay and Bay of Plenty. These results suggest that geographic mobility among Māori, and Tūhoe more specifically, are complex and should not be overly-simplified in more aggregate analyses
    corecore