3,895 research outputs found

    Aspects of the neuropsychological development and assessment of New Zealand children : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

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    Material (Chapter Nine) removed from thesis for copyright reasons: Ross-McAlpine, K.S., Leathem, J.M., & Flett, R.A. (2018). A survey of psychologists administering cognitive and neuropsychological assessments with New Zealand children, New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 47(1), 13-22. www.psychology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/A-survey-of-psychologists.pdfTypical neuropsychological development in school age children is an under-researched area. There is insufficient research on age effects on performance, relationships between multiple cognitive abilities and between these abilities and academic achievement. In addition to this, there has been no research conducted on neuropsychological assessment practices with children in New Zealand (NZ). This thesis explored patterns of neuropsychological development in typically developing children and provides clarity on the current practices of psychologists conducting neuropsychological assessment with children in NZ. Study 1 explored the age effects on neuropsychological measures for typically developing children aged 6 to 11 years. Firstly, the scaled scores of NZ children were compared with overseas normative groups and found to be within ±0.4 of a standard deviation for all tests except for finger tapping and animal sorting (NEPSY-II). Secondly, age effects were found for all measures of cognitive abilities which is consistent with previous research. Post-hoc findings identified that the most significant improvement occurred between ages 6 and 9 years. The existence of differences between NZ and USA samples, specifically found for animal sorting and finger tapping (NEPSY-II), indicates that New Zealand normative data would be beneficial for some subtests used in neuropsychological assessments. Study 2 investigated the relationships between cognitive domains and school achievement in typically developing New Zealand children. Correlational analyses found that the majority of the relationships between the cognitive domains were moderate to weak, which is consistent with overseas literature. The findings were mixed in regards to the relationships between neuropsychological ability and school achievement. Most significant relationships with overall school achievement were found in the domains of social perception and working memory, followed by processing speed, executive functioning and language. While this was congruent with the hypothesis of the study and with the literature, the finding of a non-significant relationship between motor skills and academic achievement was incongruent. Investigating these relationships across age groups revealed that age 6, 10 and 11 years are the periods of middle childhood with the strongest relationships between neuropsychological ability and achievement. Study 3 was a survey of psychologists who routinely undertook cognitive and neuropsychological assessments with New Zealand children. The WISC-IV was the most commonly used comprehensive measure to assess cognitive and neuropsychological function of New Zealand children and the most commonly used rating scales are the ABAS, CBCL and CCBRS. The results of the survey indicated that test selection appears to be based on familiarity and access. The focus on the diversity of New Zealand culture in the literature was reflected in the finding that the majority of the survey respondents considered it important to obtain normative data for New Zealand children (80.3%). In summary, these findings provide clarity around patterns of performance of typically developing children and informs the practice of neuropsychological assessment with New Zealand children

    Genetic, evolutionary and plant breeding insights from the domestication of maize.

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    The natural history of maize began nine thousand years ago when Mexican farmers started to collect the seeds of the wild grass, teosinte. Invaluable as a food source, maize permeated Mexican culture and religion. Its domestication eventually led to its adoption as a model organism, aided in large part by its large chromosomes, ease of pollination and growing agricultural importance. Genome comparisons between varieties of maize, teosinte and other grasses are beginning to identify the genes responsible for the domestication of modern maize and are also providing ideas for the breeding of more hardy varieties

    The Data Audit Framework: a toolkit to identify research assets and improve data management in research led institutions

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    Although vast quantities of data are being created within higher education, few institutions have formal strategies in place for curating these research outputs in the longterm. Moreover there appears to be a lack of awareness as to exactly what data are held and whether they are being managed. In response to these concerns the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) issued a call for proposals to develop and implement a Data Audit Framework suited to the needs of the UK higher education research communities. The Data Audit Framework (DAF) Development project was funded to produce an audit methodology, online toolkit, and a registry. Four additional implementation projects were funded to test the toolkit and promote its uptake. This paper outlines the audit methodology, introduces the online toolkit, and provides feedback on implementing the Data Audit Framework.

    Partaking of the Divine: Images of Motherhood in Autobiography

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    In the women\u27s autobiographies with which I work, meaning is created through motherhood as a system, and also through mothers themselves. In the discussions of motherhood that follow, a woman\u27s position in the world changes when related with the maternal aspect. To help me with this positioning, I plan to look at the idea of the Blessed virgin Mother, and her as she relates into the constructions of living mothers. The association of mother with the Virgin Mary causes a further split between the mother and the child because of the iconic distance inherent in the conception of the Virgin as a divine being. In my discussion of motherhood, I deal with women from a specific portion of the western world, America and England. In my study, I examine such a small area, mostly cut off from formal traditions of Catholic culture, in an attempt to explore the influence of a piece of Catholicism, the Blessed Virgin Mary, on the understanding of motherhood in a place which is much more liberal in its faith. None of the three women I use as my literary examples are Catholic, nor have any of them been raised in a Catholic culture. The relation of a Catholic understanding of motherhood as embodied in the Virgin Mary still influences the ways in which these women of other Christian faith ironically and thoughtfully portray their mothers. The Blessed Virgin Mary appears able to transcend the Roman Catholic context

    “I Know I Was a Man”: Possibilities for an Abolitionist Aesthetic

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    Simulation-Based Learning: From Learning Theory to Pedagogical Application

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    Simulation is a powerful learning tool, but being powerful requires understanding and incorporating sound educational learning theory and pedagogical practices into the design and implementation. Unfortunately, current research and publication related to simulation show limited evidence of integration of educational theory. While articles may reference learning theories in introductions or literature reviews, there is little evidence of these theories being integrated into the conceptual framework, research, or simulation-based learning event design. The purpose of this article is to highlight four learning theories that are most commonly integrated into simulation-based learning activities and how they can be specifically and practically applied to pedagogical approaches

    A comparison of psychosocial functioning between early, mid and late adolescence in young people with inflammatory bowel disease and clinical research portfolio

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    Background: The onset of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is highest during adolescence. The symptoms may make the essential developmental transitions associated with this stage more challenging and cause difficulties in psychosocial functioning. While previous research has compared adolescents with IBD to healthy controls, it may be more informative to take a developmental approach, examining psychosocial functioning within the early, mid and late stages of adolescence. Aims: The primary aim of this exploratory study was to investigate whether stage of adolescence has an effect on social functioning, body image and self-esteem in adolescents with IBD. The secondary aims were to determine whether stage of adolescence has an effect on mood, and whether demographic and disease factors have an effect on outcome measures. Methods: 63 adolescents aged between 11 and 17 years with IBD were recruited from a gastroenterology outpatient clinic. Each adolescent completed measures of social functioning, body image, self-esteem and mood. Demographic and disease information was also gathered. Outcome measures were compared between the three groups (early, mid and late adolescence) using parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Results: There were no significant differences in any of the outcomes between the three groups. The only significant finding from regression analysis was that gender significantly predicted self-esteem. Nearly half the sample reported impaired social functioning and a quarter had significant levels of anxiety. Conclusions: Stage of adolescence was not found to have an effect on psychosocial functioning or mood in this population. The small sample size, assigning developmental groups according to age and the mild disease severity of participants limit the conclusions that can be drawn from this study

    Increasing levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG is neuroprotective in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease

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    Date of Acceptance: 28/07/2015 The authors are grateful to the staff of the Medical Research Facility for their help with the animal care. This work was supported by the NHS Endowment fund 09/03 and the Wellcome Trust (WT080782MF). We thank Merck & Co. Inc., Rathway NJ, USA for the supply of DFU.Peer reviewedPublisher PD
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