98 research outputs found

    Our Liberation and the Liberation of Our Images: Friedrich Schiller and the Politics of the Image

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    In this paper, I will compare the aesthetic philosophies put forward in Friedrich Schiller’s On the Aesthetic Education of Man and Plato\u27s Republic. Using Schiller\u27s more robust aesthetic philosophy and its political import, I will argue that the government of Plato\u27s Republic would not create freedom for its citizens. Then, I will carry Schiller\u27s aesthetics and politics forward to argue, using Freud and a number of thinkers who champion Freud’s work, that economic interests can also limit the freedoms of a nation\u27s citizens. Finally, I will argue that Schiller\u27s aesthetic philosophy can deliver a political freedom free from the state control depicted in Republic and the economic control of modern consumer culture

    Atticus

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    Balance in Tristram Shandy: Laurence Sterne through Friedrich Schiller’s Eyes

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    Many critics of Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy see the novel’s narrative elements and structure as a form of narrative play, which reject Enlightenment systems of understanding. In this paper, through the philosophy of Friedrich Schiller, I will argue that the novel’s narrative structure is best understood as a balance of aesthetic impulses. For most scholars, to understand the narrative form, digressions, philosophy of knowledge, and/or history in Tristram Shandy, one must understand how the novel subverts the categorization and systematization of Enlightenment thinking. The patterns of subversion in the text lend themselves to arguments that characterize the novel as one of narrative play. This is understandable, but it ultimately does not do justice to the complexity of the novel. To address this complexity, I turn to Friedrich Schiller, a German poet and philosopher. I argue that the text enacts Schiller’s aesthetic framework by synthesizing the competing impulses he describes in his aesthetic philosophy. Tristram Shandy does not seek the order and systems of Locke and the Enlightenment, nor the overwhelming feeling of the Romantics’ sublimity; instead, Tristram Shandy, setting a precedent for Schiller’s philosophy, seeks the most beautiful aesthetic goal, balance

    Square and Compasses

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    The Golden Spiral

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    New Topics, New Powers, and New Spirit: Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg and the Power of the Poet

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    Walt Whitman was an enormous influence on Allen Ginsberg, which Lawrence Ferlinghetti recognized at the first public reading of “Howl” in 1955. Leaves of Grass, first published in 1855, featured untitled twelve poems without rhyme, meter, or traditional line breaks. However, acknowledging a single influential figure for a countercultural writer is a somewhat uncommon phenomenon. Countercultural movements and countercultural artists tend to define themselves by standing against the dominant culture, an understandable instinct that yields important insights. Still the link between Ginsberg and Whitman is unmistakable. By analyzing the complex ties between an example of Whitman’s and Ginsberg’s major work and by exploring the personal intricacy of both men’s lives within their own cultural periods, I will reveal how each poet absorbed his country only to be sorely disappointed. Using Whitman’s “Song of Myself” and Ginsberg’s “Howl,” I will compare the startlingly modern use of free verse, poetic convention, and thematic unity in each poem. In addition, an analysis of each poet’s lived experience will provide insight into how these men, who lived a century part, recognized the artistic value of their time in American history and utilized this cultural awareness to fuel their unique contributions to American poetry. Both men grappled with their sexuality, which made them outcasts; they both had strong feelings about the politics of their times; they both sought the companionship of unsavory people; and they both yearned to speak directly about American life. Whitman and Ginsburg cut against the grain of their respective literary and cultural backdrops, and my investigation of their similarities will reveal how their willingness to pursue what Ralph Waldo Emerson called “new topics, new powers, and a new spirit” challenged what their dominate cultures called poetry

    Stigmatized Words: A Defense of Political Correctness

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    The debate over political correctness and the repression of speech has experienced a resurgence in the 2016 election season. “Political correctness is killing people,” Senator Ted Cruz remarked in December 2015. This thesis explores the liberal justification for the repressing politically incorrect speech and challenges the association of expressive freedom with truth, a position linked to John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of liberty and George Orwell’s denunciation of political speech. Reflecting contemporary postmodern views on language and liberation, I ultimately defend political correctness as a way to reflect social stigmatization, render stigmatized words more visible, and enhance linguistic agency

    Dendron, A Collection of Poems

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    “Dendron” is the Greek word for “tree.” “Dendrochronology” is the study of a tree’s rings. “Dendrites” are the neural projections that grow like a tree’s branches in our brains so we can learn and respond to stimuli. This collection of poems, Dendron, is a poetic exploration of my growth. The collection—twenty-one poems, one for each year of my life—is a living, poetic memoir. Presented in chronological order, each of the poems is meant to capture a specific year of my life. The poems—of varying styles and sentiments—are not without quick moments of fiction, but for the most part, they coalesce into a poetic autobiography. The poems at the start of the collection are strange and abstract. There aren’t memories to pull from for those years, so those poems capture the indescribable, mysterious early stages of human existence. A sense of place is established as the collection moves on from those first poems, and as it grows, it primarily addresses themes of belonging, family, and trust. Along the way, it makes room for tradition, God, romance, travel, loss, masculinity, and art. Each of the poems features an original, accompanying illustration drawn by Veronica Rosenberger. The cover art for the collection is also an illustration of hers. The drawings were created with the poems in mind, so while the poems are meant to stand alone, the illustrations provide vivid exclamation marks. Each year, I will add a poem to the collection, and like the rings that form as a tree grows, this collection will grow as I do

    The Axonal Guidance Receptor Neogenin Promotes Acute Inflammation

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    Neuronal guidance proteins (NGP) were originally described in the context of axonal growth and migration. Yet recent work has demonstrated that NGPs also serve as guidance cues for immune competent cells. A crucial target receptor for NGPs during embryonic development is the neogenin receptor, however its role during acute inflammation is unknown. We report here that neogenin is abundantly expressed outside the nervous system and that animals with endogenous repression of neogenin (Neo1−/−) demonstrate attenuated changes of acute inflammation. Studies using functional inhibition of neogenin resulted in a significant attenuation of inflammatory peritonitis. In studies employing bone marrow chimeric animals we found the hematopoietic presence of Neo1−/− to be responsible for the attenuated inflammatory response. Taken together our studies suggest that the guidance receptor neogenin holds crucial importance for the propagation of an acute inflammatory response and further define mechanisms shared between the nervous and the immune system
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