5,203 research outputs found

    Thrombo-angiitis obliterans

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    The Beggar\u27s Free Speech

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    Uncovering Markers for Honey Production and Defensive Behaviour Using Pooled Genome-Wide Data with the Honeybee (Apis Mellifera)

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    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been an important insect for both the study of social insect behaviour and agriculture. Honey production and defensive behaviour are honeybees two notable and economically valuable traits. Here we perform a genome-wide association study on 925 honeybee colonies from across Canada to elucidate the genetics of these two traits. We find that 168 SNPs for honey production and 41 SNPs for defensive behaviour are significantly associated with their respective phenotypes. Moreover, using genome-wide data, we achieved a predictive performance for honey production of Rsq= 27.1% and for defensive behaviour an accuracy of 77.5%. My research shows how genome-wide data can be used both for understanding the genetics of honey production and defensive behaviour in honeybees and for predicting the phenotypes of individual colonies using machine learning techniques

    The Beggar\u27s Free Speech

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    Does Watching Strippers Make Me More Likely to be a Victim of Crime?

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    Adoption of Improved Wheat Technologies by Small-Scale Farmers in Mbeya District, Southern Highlands, Tanzania

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    This study was conducted to gain an understanding of how small-scale farmers in Mbeya District have adopted improved wheat technologies promoted by the wheat research program at MARTI-Uyole. The specific objectives were to assess farmers’ wheat management practices, determine the technical and socioeconomic factors affecting the adoption of improved wheat technologies, and draw implications for research, extension, and policy. A purposive multistage sampling procedure was used to select 202 farmers, 160 from Tembela Division and 42 from Isangati Division, which are two important wheat-growing areas in Mbeya District. Primary data were collected using structured questionnaires and supplemented by secondary information obtained from MARTI-Uyole. Juhudi was the preferred improved wheat variety grown by adopters. For all farmers, the most important characteristics preferred in a variety were high yield, marketability, grain color, and early maturity. In 1997, about 74% of sample farmers adopted improved wheat varieties. The rate of adoption increased between 1989 and 1995 for a number of reasons, including provision of seed and fertilizer by Sasakawa Global-2000 (SG-2000), the collapse of the pyrethrum industry, and market liberalization. After 1995, adoption declined because SG-2000 was phased out and the varieties had succumbed to stem rust and foliar diseases. Tobit analysis showed that farm size, family size, and the use of hired labor were significant factors affecting the proportion of land allocated to improved wheat. Farm size, family size, hired labor, and credit all significantly affected the amount of fertilizer used. Additional improved varieties need to be developed, not only to replace the old varieties, but to give farmers a wider choice. Fertilizer recommendations need to be reviewed to take into consideration farmers’ circumstances such as cash availability and soil fertility. Extension services in the area should be increased and the link between extension workers and landholders strengthened to promote the adoption of improved wheat technologies. The formal credit market is only weakly involved in supplying credit to wheat farmers, but rising input prices, especially for fertilizer, make access to credit increasingly important for farmers. Policymakers and bankers should focus on providing loans to small-scale wheat farmers with high rates of loan recovery and low cost of credit. Farmers should also be encouraged to form their own savings and credit cooperatives at the village level. Policymakers should continue to encourage and support the private sector to invest in input acquisition and distribution so that inputs (especially seed and fertilizer) are available when farmers need them.Tanzania, wheats, varieties, innovation adoption, technology transfer, economic indicators, socioeconomic environment, plant breeding methods, research programs, crop management, fertilizer application, food production, small farms, highlands, Crop Production/Industries, E14, E30,

    Effects of Cooperative and Individual Integrated Learning System on Attitudes and Achievement in Mathematics

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    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a computer-based Integrated Learning Systems (ILS) model used with adult high school students engaging mathematics activities. This study examined achievement, attitudinal and behavior differences between students completing ILS activities in a traditional, individualized format compared to cooperative learning groups

    Africa's Performance in Leaving No Child Behind in Poverty

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    How is Africa performing in leaving no child behind in poverty? Disparities exist in child poverty issues across countries: millions of children’s lives are blighted for no other reason than the country, the community, the gender, or the circumstances into which they are born. Due to uneven progress, we compared under-five mortality rates (U5MR), primary school enrolment (PSE), and child underweight (CU) across country clusters of low and middle income, and low U5MR and high U5MR in Africa. Endogeneity issues led to the use of Three Stages Least Squares simultaneous equations, and we applied elasticity to allow direct comparisons between elasticities across country clusters. African countries in low income and high U5MR clusters are far from leaving no child behind. These clusters display common causes of child poverty, including low gender parity index, low PSE, high CU, high numbers of out-of-school children, and poor governance. The estimated elasticities indicate that ethnolinguistic fractionalisation (women’s access to credit) and CU have the greatest effect on U5MR (child poverty), while crop production index (CPI), U5MR and CU have the greatest effect on PSE. CPI and female enrolment in secondary and vocational school have the greatest effect on CU. These findings imply that economic and social policies should consider allocating more resources to low-income and high-U5MR countries. Furthermore, the results tend to point to agriculture as a solution to child poverty issues in Africa. This occurs through an enabling environment for women in agriculture to access productive resourcesPeer reviewe
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