24 research outputs found

    Uranium and Associated Heavy Metals in Ovis aries in a Mining Impacted Area in Northwestern New Mexico.

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    The objective of this study was to determine uranium (U) and other heavy metal (HM) concentrations (As, Cd, Pb, Mo, and Se) in tissue samples collected from sheep (Ovis aries), the primary meat staple on the Navajo reservation in northwestern New Mexico. The study setting was a prime target of U mining, where more than 1100 unreclaimed abandoned U mines and structures remain. The forage and water sources for the sheep in this study were located within 3.2 km of abandoned U mines and structures. Tissue samples from sheep (n = 3), their local forage grasses (n = 24), soil (n = 24), and drinking water (n = 14) sources were collected. The samples were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Results: In general, HMs concentrated more in the roots of forage compared to the above ground parts. The sheep forage samples fell below the National Research Council maximum tolerable concentration (5 mg/kg). The bioaccumulation factor ratio was >1 in several forage samples, ranging from 1.12 to 16.86 for Mo, Cd, and Se. The study findings showed that the concentrations of HMs were greatest in the liver and kidneys. Of the calculated human intake, Se Reference Dietary Intake and Mo Recommended Dietary Allowance were exceeded, but the tolerable upper limits for both were not exceeded. Food intake recommendations informed by research are needed for individuals especially those that may be more sensitive to HMs. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to explore other impacted communities across the reservation

    Uranium and Associated Heavy Metals in Ovis aries in a Mining Impacted Area in Northwestern New Mexico

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    The objective of this study was to determine uranium (U) and other heavy metal (HM) concentrations (As, Cd, Pb, Mo, and Se) in tissue samples collected from sheep (Ovis aries), the primary meat staple on the Navajo reservation in northwestern New Mexico. The study setting was a prime target of U mining, where more than 1100 unreclaimed abandoned U mines and structures remain. The forage and water sources for the sheep in this study were located within 3.2 km of abandoned U mines and structures. Tissue samples from sheep (n = 3), their local forage grasses (n = 24), soil (n = 24), and drinking water (n = 14) sources were collected. The samples were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Results: In general, HMs concentrated more in the roots of forage compared to the above ground parts. The sheep forage samples fell below the National Research Council maximum tolerable concentration (5 mg/kg). The bioaccumulation factor ratio was >1 in several forage samples, ranging from 1.12 to 16.86 for Mo, Cd, and Se. The study findings showed that the concentrations of HMs were greatest in the liver and kidneys. Of the calculated human intake, Se Reference Dietary Intake and Mo Recommended Dietary Allowance were exceeded, but the tolerable upper limits for both were not exceeded. Food intake recommendations informed by research are needed for individuals especially those that may be more sensitive to HMs. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to explore other impacted communities across the reservation

    Stable Variants of Sperm Aneuploidy among Healthy Men Show Associations between Germinal and Somatic Aneuploidy

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    Repeated semen specimens from healthy men were analyzed by sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to identify men who consistently produced elevated frequencies of aneuploid sperm and to determine whether men who were identified as stable variants of sperm aneuploidy also exhibited higher frequencies of aneuploidy in their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Seven semen specimens were provided by each of 15 men over a 2-year period and were evaluated by the X-Y-8 multicolor sperm FISH method (i.e., ∼1,050,000 sperm were analyzed from 105 specimens). Three men were identified as stable aneuploidy variants producing significantly higher frequencies of XY, disomy X, disomy Y, disomy 8, and/or diploid sperm over time. In addition, one man and three men were identified as sperm-morphology and sperm-motility variants, respectively. Strong correlations were found between the frequencies of sperm with autosomal and sex-chromosome aneuploidies and between the two types of meiosis II diploidy; but not between sperm aneuploidy and semen quality. A significant association was found between the frequencies of sex-chromosome aneuploidies in sperm and lymphocytes in a subset of 10 men (r(2)=0.67, P=.004), especially between XY sperm and sex-chromosome aneuploidy in lymphocytes (r(2)=0.70, P=.003). These findings suggest that certain apparently healthy men can produce significantly higher frequencies of both aneuploid sperm and lymphocytes. Serious long-term somatic and reproductive health consequences may include increased risks of aneuploidy-related somatic diseases and of having children with paternally transmitted aneuploidies, such as Klinefelter, Turner, triple-X, and XYY syndromes
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