12 research outputs found

    Dual role of Mic10 in mitochondrial cristae organization and ATP synthase-linked metabolic adaptation and respiratory growth

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    Invaginations of the mitochondrial inner membrane, termed cristae, are hubs for oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) and the dimeric F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase play important roles in controlling cristae architecture. A fraction of the MICOS core subunit Mic10 is found in association with the ATP synthase, yet it is unknown whether this interaction is of relevance for mitochondrial or cellular functions. Here, we established conditions to selectively study the role of Mic10 at the ATP synthase. Mic10 variants impaired in MICOS functions stimulate ATP synthase oligomerization like wild-type Mic10 and promote efficient inner membrane energization, adaptation to non-fermentable carbon sources, and respiratory growth. Mic10's functions in respiratory growth largely depend on Mic10(ATPsynthase), not on Mic10(MICOS). We conclude that Mic10 plays a dual role as core subunit of MICOS and as partner of the F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase, serving distinct functions in cristae shaping and respiratory adaptation and growth

    Central role of mic10 in the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system

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    The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is a conserved multi-subunit complex crucial for maintaining the characteristic architecture of mitochondria. Studies with deletion mutants identified Mic10 and Mic60 as core subunits of MICOS. Mic60 has been studied in detail; however, topogenesis and function of Mic10 are unknown. We report that targeting of Mic10 to the mitochondrial inner membrane requires a positively charged internal loop, but no cleavable presequence. Both transmembrane segments of Mic10 carry a characteristic four-glycine motif, which has been found in the ring-forming rotor subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthases. Overexpression of Mic10 profoundly alters the architecture of the inner membrane independently of other MICOS components. The four-glycine motifs are dispensable for interaction of Mic10 with other MICOS subunits but are crucial for the formation of large Mic10 oligomers. Our studies identify a unique role of Mic10 oligomers in promoting the formation of inner membrane crista junctions

    The Yin & Yang of Mitochondrial Architecture - Interplay of MICOS and F1Fo-ATP synthase in cristae formation

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    Oxidative phosphorylation takes place at specialized compartments of the inner mitochondrial membrane, the cristae. The elaborate ultrastructure of cristae membranes enables efficient chemi-osmotic coupling of respiratory chain and F1Fo-ATP synthase. Dynamic membrane remodeling allows mitochondria to adapt to changing physiological requirements. The mito-chondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) and the oligomeric ATP synthase have been known to govern distinct features of cristae architec-ture. A new study [1] on the crosstalk between these two machineries now sheds light on the mechanisms of cristae formation and maintenance

    Hsp110 chaperones regulate prion formation and propagation in S. cerevisiae by two discrete activities

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    The cytosolic chaperone network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is intimately associated with the emergence and maintenance of prion traits. Recently, the Hsp110 protein, Sse1, has been identified as a nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) for both cytosolic Hsp70 chaperone family members, Ssa1 and Ssb1. We have investigated the role of Sse1 in the de novo formation and propagation of [PSI +], the prion form of the translation termination factor, Sup35. As observed by others, we find that Sse1 is essential for efficient prion propagation. Our results suggest that the NEF activity is required for maintaining sufficient levels of substrate-free Ssa1. However, Sse1 exhibits an additional NEF-independent activity; it stimulates in vitro nucleation of Sup35NM, the prion domain of Sup35. We also observe that high levels of Sse1, but not of an unrelated NEF, very potently inhibit Hsp104-mediated curing of [PSI +]. Taken together, these results suggest a chaperone-like activity of Sse1 that assists in stabilization of early folding intermediates of the Sup35 prion conformation. This activity is not essential for prion formation under conditions of Sup35 overproduction, however, it may be relevant for spontaneous [PSI +

    The mitochondrial carrier pathway transports non-canonical substrates with an odd number of transmembrane segments

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    International audienceBackground: The mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) plays a central role in energy metabolism by transporting pyruvate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Its heterodimeric composition and homology to SWEET and semiSWEET transporters set the MPC apart from the canonical mitochondrial carrier family (named MCF or SLC25). The import of the canonical carriers is mediated by the carrier translocase of the inner membrane (TIM22) pathway and is dependent on their structure, which features an even number of transmembrane segments and both termini in the intermembrane space. The import pathway of MPC proteins has not been elucidated. The odd number of transmembrane segments and positioning of the N-terminus in the matrix argues against an import via the TIM22 carrier pathway but favors an import via the flexible presequence pathway. Results: Here, we systematically analyzed the import pathways of Mpc2 and Mpc3 and report that, contrary to an expected import via the flexible presequence pathway, yeast MPC proteins with an odd number of transmembrane segments and matrix-exposed N-terminus are imported by the carrier pathway, using the receptor Tom70, small TIM chaperones, and the TIM22 complex. The TIM9·10 complex chaperones MPC proteins through the mitochondrial intermembrane space using conserved hydrophobic motifs that are also required for the interaction with canonical carrier proteins. Conclusions: The carrier pathway can import paired and non-paired transmembrane helices and translocate N-termini to either side of the mitochondrial inner membrane, revealing an unexpected versatility of the mitochondrial import pathway for non-cleavable inner membrane proteins

    Assembly of the Mitochondrial Cristae Organizer Mic10 is Regulated by Mic26-Mic27 Antagonism and Cardiolipin

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    The multi-subunit mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is a conserved protein complex of the inner mitochondrial membrane that is essential for maintenance of cristae architecture. The core subunit Mic10 forms large oligomers that build a scaffold and induce membrane curvature. The regulation of Mic10 oligomerization is poorly understood. We report that Mic26 exerts a destabilizing effect on Mic10 oligomers and thus functions in an antagonistic manner to the stabilizing subunit Mic27. The mitochondrial signature phospholipid cardiolipin shows a stabilizing function on Mic10 oligomers. Our findings indicate that the Mic10 core machinery of MICOS is regulated by several mechanisms, including interaction with cardiolipin and antagonistic actions of Mic26 and Mic27

    The Endoplasmic Reticulum Grp170 Acts as a Nucleotide Exchange Factor of Hsp70 via a Mechanism Similar to That of the Cytosolic Hsp110*

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    Grp170 and Hsp110 proteins constitute two evolutionary distinct branches of the Hsp70 family that share the ability to function as nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) for canonical Hsp70s. Although the NEF mechanism of the cytoplasmic Hsp110s is well understood, little is known regarding the mechanism used by Grp170s in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we compare the yeast Grp170 Lhs1 with the yeast Hsp110 Sse1. We find that residues important for Sse1 NEF activity are conserved in Lhs1 and that mutations in these residues in Lhs1 compromise NEF activity. As previously reported for Sse1, Lhs1 requires ATP to trigger nucleotide exchange in its cognate Hsp70 partner Kar2. Using site-specific cross-linking, we show that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of Lhs1 interacts with the NBD of Kar2 face to face, and that Lhs1 contacts the side of the Kar2 NBD via its protruding C-terminal α-helical domain. To directly address the mechanism of nucleotide exchange, we have compared the hydrogen-exchange characteristics of a yeast Hsp70 NBD (Ssa1) in complex with either Sse1 or Lhs1. We find that Lhs1 and Sse1 induce very similar changes in the conformational dynamics in the Hsp70. Thus, our findings demonstrate that despite some differences between Hsp110 and Grp170 proteins, they use a similar mechanism to trigger nucleotide exchange
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