155 research outputs found

    Reformulating Burmese Harp Tunings

    Get PDF
    Distinctive in shape, size, construction and playing position, the Burmese harp has been traditionally tuned by ear; that is, without the intervention of a monochord or more recent devices, such as electronic tuners. In the latter regard, it is similar to harps and lyres of Antiquity: in Mesopotamia about four millennia ago, Ancient Greece more than 2300 years ago, and Ancient India about 1700 years ago. Also of plausible relevance to Burmese harp tuning are tunings of fixed-frequency instruments of other Southeast Asian traditions: of Central Java and Thailand, for example. Although such xylophones and metallophones have also been tuned by ear and employed in Burmese classical music along with the harp, the inharmonic spectra of their tones differ from the harmonic spectra produced by the open strings of the harps and lyres just mentioned. In particular, open strings produce predictable beats when plucked simultaneously

    Cyclical Structures in Central Javanese Skeletal Melodies

    Get PDF

    Text Underlay in Gagnon's Collection of French-Canadian Folk Songs

    Get PDF

    Khong Wong Yai Octaves

    Get PDF

    From Drawings by the Blind to Music by the Deaf

    Get PDF

    Balungan Pélog Tones of Gamelan Kyai Parijata Compared with Sine Tones

    Get PDF
    gamela

    Folk Music, Traditional Music, Ethnomusicology: Canadian Perspectives, Past and Present. Anna Hoefnagels and Gordon E. Smith (eds.).

    Get PDF

    Pairs of Interval Classes in Southeast Asian Tunings

    Get PDF
    Construed non-numerically (Rahn 2011, 2012, 2013), the following normal-Forte-order formulations accurately model southeast Asian fixed-frequency tunings: sléndro 11111…, the ‘usual’ pentatonic 22323…, Thai pentatonic 11212, 5-tone pélog 11313; Thai ‘equiheptatonic’ 1111111…, diatonis/diatonic 1222122, and 7-tone pélog 1112112. In well-documented instances, two or more of these tunings appear in single pieces that have been realized in one or more cultural settings. In order to convey the consequences of such ‘translations’ from one tuning to another, seemingly distinct tuning, one can observe that since each tuning is ‘well-formed’ (Carey and Clampitt 1989), each maximizes the number of interval-pairs within particular generic-specific interval-classes. In ideal, mathematical terms, if d is the number of steps in a register, the number of such interval-pairs is d2(d-1)/2in ‘degenerate’ sléndro and Thai equiheptatonic, and d(d-1)(2d-1)/6 in the remaining, ‘non-degenerate’ tunings. The formulation outlined above identifies salient structural relationships between realizations of single instrumental pieces in otherwise contrasting tunings and between passages comprising ‘exchange tones’ (métabole) within individual pieces

    “M'en Revenant de la Joli' Rochelle”: A song from ca. 1500 in the current French-Canadian repertoire

    Get PDF
    Jay Rahn présente une étude détaillée de la chanson française body temps. le travers à retenues sont folkloriques des caractéristiques les comment illustre et polyphoniques, monophoniques chansons entre différences discute Il Canada. au France en notées été ont versions maintes dont siècle seixième du début dâte qui chanson Rochelle, joli la de revenan

    Stereotyped Forms in English-Canadian Children's Songs: Historical and Pedagogical Aspects

    Get PDF
    En analysant les airs propres aux chants traditionnels des enfants au Canada, Jay Rahn constate quil y a trois formes stéréotypées qui renferment un nombre considérable d items différents. Il les classe sous trois formes: celle de “London Bridge”, celle de “Go, In and Out the Window” et celle de “Farmer in the Dell”. Il souligne l'histoire, la répartition de chacun et démontre que les motifs, les textes, les contours mélodiques et la rime sont coordonnés dans chaque groupe. Ce quil a trouvé, prouve quel étude des chants traditionnels des enfants peut être d une grande valeur pour le professeur de musique
    • …
    corecore