2,212 research outputs found

    The new Arab man

    Get PDF
    n/

    Targeted genome modifications in soybean with CRISPR/Cas9

    Get PDF
    Background: The ability to selectively alter genomic DNA sequences in vivo is a powerful tool for basic and applied research. The CRISPR/Cas9 system precisely mutates DNA sequences in a number of organisms. Here, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is shown to be effective in soybean by knocking-out a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene and modifying nine endogenous loci. Results: Targeted DNA mutations were detected in 95% of 88 hairy-root transgenic events analyzed. Bi-allelic mutations were detected in events transformed with eight of the nine targeting vectors. Small deletions were the most common type of mutation produced, although SNPs and short insertions were also observed. Homoeologous genes were successfully targeted singly and together, demonstrating that CRISPR/Cas9 can both selectively, and generally, target members of gene families. Somatic embryo cultures were also modified to enable the production of plants with heritable mutations, with the frequency of DNA modifications increasing with culture time. A novel cloning strategy and vector system based on In-Fusion (R) cloning was developed to simplify the production of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting vectors, which should be applicable for targeting any gene in any organism. Conclusions: The CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple, efficient, and highly specific genome editing tool in soybean. Although some vectors are more efficient than others, it is possible to edit duplicated genes relatively easily. The vectors and methods developed here will be useful for the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to soybean and other plant species

    Experimental validation of a two-dimensional shear-flow model for determining acoustic impedance

    Get PDF
    Tests were conducted to validate a two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determining the acoustic impedance of a liner test specimen in a grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment. The tests were limited to a test specimen chosen to exhibit minimal effects of grazing flow so that the results obtained by using the shear-flow analytical model would be expected to match those obtained from normal-incidence impedance measurements. Impedances for both downstream and upstream sound propagation were generally consistent with those from normal-incidence measurements. However, sensitivity of the grazing-incidence impedance to small measurement or systematic errors in propagation constant varied dramatically over the range of test frequencies

    Radiation from a Charge Uniformly Accelerated for All Time

    Get PDF
    A recent paper of Singal [Gen. Rel. Grav. 27 (1995), 953-967] argues that a uniformly accelerated particle does not radiate, in contradiction to the consensus of the research literature over the past 30 years. This note points out some questionable aspects of Singal's argument and shows how similar calculations can lead to the opposite conclusion.Comment: LaTeX, 9 pages, to appear in General Relativity and Gravitatio

    Models of brain injury vocational rehabilitation: The evidence for resource facilitation from efficacy to effectiveness

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: Resource Facilitation (RF) is an intervention developed to improve return to work (RTW) following brain injury. RF is an individualized treatment specializing in connecting patients and caregivers with community-based resources and services to mitigate barriers to return to work. OBJECTIVES: Examine the effectiveness of the RHI RF program for a clinical prospective cohort of participants referred to this program from the State Vocational Rehabilitation agency. METHODS: Participants were 243 participants with data drawn from the two sources: 33 from previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) control groups who did not receive RF and 210 from clinical patients discharged from the RHI RF program. RESULTS: At discharge from RF, a greater proportion of the treatment group obtained employment than the control group [X2 (1)  = 5.39, p = 0.018]. When controlling for baseline level of disability, treatment group significantly predicted employment outcome (Wald = 4.52, p = 0.033) and participants in the treatment group were 2.3 times more likely to return to work than controls. CONCLUSIONS: Previous RCTs have studied the RHI RF model and demonstrated significant efficacy. The findings from the present study are consistent with the employment rates found in the previous RCT's following RF, and also provide initial support for the clinical effectiveness of RF

    Growing older in secure mental health care: the user experience

    Get PDF
    Background: The proportion of older adults using secure forensic psychiatric services is rising. Research is needed to examine the experience of older service users and evidence how adult services can adapt to meet their needs. Aim: To explore user experiences of being an older adult in secure forensic services. Methods: Thematic analysis of interviews and observations of weekly routines conducted with fifteen service users aged 50 and over residing in a low and medium secure NHS unit in England. Results: User experiences of ageing and age-related needs are reported using five themes: age-related identities; ward environments; participation in activities; management of physical health; and ageing futures. Older adults living with people their own age reported more social integration than those on wards dominated by younger adults. Most wished to self-manage their physical health needs with the support of primary care staff. Older adults were reluctant to identify as “old” or “vulnerable”. Some older adults downplayed their changing care needs. Conclusions: Placement of older people in adult secure services requires awareness of the age balance of the ward. A culture of inclusivity, sensitivity and respect for older persons’ agency is key to collaboratively meeting additional care needs and discharge planning

    Strandline Features and Late Pleistocene Chronology of Northwest Vermont

    Get PDF
    Guidebook for field trips in Vermont: 64th annual meeting October 13, 14, 15, 1972 Burlington, Vermont: Trip G-

    Data handling methods and target detection results for multibeam and sidescan data collected as part of the search for SwissAir Flight 111

    Get PDF
    The crash of SwissAir Flight 111, off Nova Scotia in September 1998, triggered one of the largest seabed search surveys in Canadian history. The primary search tools used were sidescan sonars (both conventional and focussed types) and multibeam sonars. The processed search data needed to be distributed on a daily basis to other elements of the fleet for precise location of divers and other optical seabed search instruments (including laser linescan and ROV video). As a result of the glacial history of the region, many natural targets, similar in gross nature to aircraft debris were present. These included widespread linear bedrock outcrop patterns together with near ubiquitous glacial erratic boulders. Because of the severely broken-up nature of the remaining aircraft debris, sidescan imaging alone was often insufficient to unambiguously identify targets. The complementary attributes of higher resolution, but poorly located, sidescan imagery together with slightly lower resolution, but excellently navigated multibeam sonar proved to be one of critical factors in the success of the search. It proved necessary to rely heavily on the regional context of the seabed (provided by the multibeam sonar bathymetry and backscatter imagery) to separate natural geomorphic targets from anomalous anthropogenic debris. In order to confidently prove or disprove a potential target, the interpreter required simultaneous access to the full resolution sidescan data in the geographic context of the multibeam framework. Specific software tools had to be adapted or developed shipboard to provide this capability. Whilst developed specifically for this application, these survey tools can provide improved processing speed and confidence as part of more general mine hunting, hydrographic, engineering or scientific surveys

    Fertility intentions and use of contraception among monogamous couples in northern Malawi in the context of HIV testing: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Get PDF
    CONTEXT: Knowledge of HIV status may influence fertility desires of married men and women. There is little knowledge about the importance of this influence among monogamously married couples and how knowledge of HIV status influences use of contraception among these couples. METHODOLOGY: We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of interview data collected between October 2008 and September 2009 on men aged 15-59 years and women aged 15-49 years who formed 1766 monogamously married couples within the Karonga Prevention Study demographic surveillance study in northern Malawi. RESULTS: 5% of men and 4% of women knew that they were HIV positive at the time of interview and 81% of men and 89% of women knew that they were HIV negative. 73% of men and 83% of women who knew that they were HIV positive stated that they did not want more children, compared to 35% of men and 38% of women who knew they were HIV negative. Concordant HIV positive couples were more likely than concordant negative couples to desire to stop child bearing (odds ratio 11.5, 95%CI 4.3-30.7, after adjusting for other factors) but only slightly more likely to use contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio 1.5 (95%CI 0.8-3.3). CONCLUSION: Knowledge of HIV positive status is associated with an increase in the reported desire to cease childbearing but there was limited evidence that this desire led to higher use of contraception. More efforts directed towards assisting HIV positive couples to access and use reproductive health services and limit HIV transmission among couples are recommended
    corecore