6 research outputs found

    Comprehensive analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics to understand tail-suspension-induced myocardial injury in rat

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    Background/AimsThe effect and underlying mechanism of microgravity on myocardium still poorly understood. The present study aims to reveal the effect and underlying mechanism of tail-suspension-induced microgravity on myocardium of rats.MethodsTail-suspension was conducted to simulate microgravity in rats. Echocardiography assay was used to detect cardiac function. The cardiac weight index was measured. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy assay were conducted to observe the structure of the tissues. RNA sequencing and non-targeted metabolomics was employed to obtain transcriptome and metabolic signatures of heart from tail-suspension-induced microgravity and control rats.ResultsMicrogravity induced myocardial atrophy and decreased cardiac function in rats. Structure and ultrastructure changes were observed in myocardium of rats stimulated with microgravity. RNA sequencing for protein coding genes was performed and identified a total of 605 genes were differentially expressed in myocardium of rats with tail suspension, with 250 upregulated and 355 downregulated (P < 0.05 and | log2fold change| > 1). A total of 55 differentially expressed metabolites were identified between the two groups (VIP > 1 and P < 0.05) by the metabolic profiles of heart tissues from microgravity groups and control. Several major pathways altered aberrantly at both transcriptional and metabolic levels, including FoxO signaling pathway, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Histidine metabolism, Arginine and proline metabolism.ConclusionMicrogravity can induce myocardial atrophy and decreases cardiac function in rats and the molecular alterations at the metabolic and transcriptomic levels was observed, which indicated major altered pathways in rats with tail suspension. The differentially expressed genes and metabolites-involved in the pathways maybe potential biomarkers for microgravity-induced myocardial atrophy

    Table_5_Comprehensive analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics to understand tail-suspension-induced myocardial injury in rat.XLS

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    Background/AimsThe effect and underlying mechanism of microgravity on myocardium still poorly understood. The present study aims to reveal the effect and underlying mechanism of tail-suspension-induced microgravity on myocardium of rats.MethodsTail-suspension was conducted to simulate microgravity in rats. Echocardiography assay was used to detect cardiac function. The cardiac weight index was measured. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy assay were conducted to observe the structure of the tissues. RNA sequencing and non-targeted metabolomics was employed to obtain transcriptome and metabolic signatures of heart from tail-suspension-induced microgravity and control rats.ResultsMicrogravity induced myocardial atrophy and decreased cardiac function in rats. Structure and ultrastructure changes were observed in myocardium of rats stimulated with microgravity. RNA sequencing for protein coding genes was performed and identified a total of 605 genes were differentially expressed in myocardium of rats with tail suspension, with 250 upregulated and 355 downregulated (P 1). A total of 55 differentially expressed metabolites were identified between the two groups (VIP > 1 and P ConclusionMicrogravity can induce myocardial atrophy and decreases cardiac function in rats and the molecular alterations at the metabolic and transcriptomic levels was observed, which indicated major altered pathways in rats with tail suspension. The differentially expressed genes and metabolites-involved in the pathways maybe potential biomarkers for microgravity-induced myocardial atrophy.</p

    Table_4_Comprehensive analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics to understand tail-suspension-induced myocardial injury in rat.XLSX

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    Background/AimsThe effect and underlying mechanism of microgravity on myocardium still poorly understood. The present study aims to reveal the effect and underlying mechanism of tail-suspension-induced microgravity on myocardium of rats.MethodsTail-suspension was conducted to simulate microgravity in rats. Echocardiography assay was used to detect cardiac function. The cardiac weight index was measured. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy assay were conducted to observe the structure of the tissues. RNA sequencing and non-targeted metabolomics was employed to obtain transcriptome and metabolic signatures of heart from tail-suspension-induced microgravity and control rats.ResultsMicrogravity induced myocardial atrophy and decreased cardiac function in rats. Structure and ultrastructure changes were observed in myocardium of rats stimulated with microgravity. RNA sequencing for protein coding genes was performed and identified a total of 605 genes were differentially expressed in myocardium of rats with tail suspension, with 250 upregulated and 355 downregulated (P 1). A total of 55 differentially expressed metabolites were identified between the two groups (VIP > 1 and P ConclusionMicrogravity can induce myocardial atrophy and decreases cardiac function in rats and the molecular alterations at the metabolic and transcriptomic levels was observed, which indicated major altered pathways in rats with tail suspension. The differentially expressed genes and metabolites-involved in the pathways maybe potential biomarkers for microgravity-induced myocardial atrophy.</p

    Dammarane Sapogenins Ameliorates Neurocognitive Functional Impairment Induced by Simulated Long-Duration Spaceflight

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    Increasing evidence indicates the occurrence of cognitive impairment in astronauts under spaceflight compound conditions, but the underlying mechanisms and countermeasures need to be explored. In this study, we found that learning and memory abilities were significantly reduced in rats under a simulated long-duration spaceflight environment (SLSE), which includes microgravity, isolation confinement, noises, and altered circadian rhythms. Dammarane sapogenins (DS), alkaline hydrolyzed products of ginsenosides, can enhance cognition function by regulating brain neurotransmitter levels and inhibiting SLSE-induced neuronal injury. Bioinformatics combined with experimental verification identified that the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was inhibited and the MAPK pathway was activated during SLSE-induced cognition dysfunction, whereas DS substantially ameliorated the changes in brain. These findings defined the characteristics of SLSE-induced cognitive decline and the mechanisms by which DS improves it. The results provide an effective candidate for improving cognitive function in spaceflight missions

    Mobile Health Technology to Improve Care for Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

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    Background Current management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is limited by low detection of AF, non-adherence to guidelines, and lack of consideration of patients’ preferences, thus highlighting the need for a more holistic and integrated approach to AF management. Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether a mobile health (mHealth) technology-supported AF integrated management strategy would reduce AF-related adverse events, compared with usual care. Methods This is a cluster randomized trial of patients with AF older than 18 years of age who were enrolled in 40 cities in China. Recruitment began on June 1, 2018 and follow-up ended on August 16, 2019. Patients with AF were randomized to receive usual care, or integrated care based on a mobile AF Application (mAFA) incorporating the ABC (Atrial Fibrillation Better Care) Pathway: A, Avoid stroke; B, Better symptom management; and C, Cardiovascular and other comorbidity risk reduction. The primary composite outcome was a composite of stroke/thromboembolism, all-cause death, and rehospitalization. Rehospitalization alone was a secondary outcome. Cardiovascular events were assessed using Cox proportional hazard modeling after adjusting for baseline risk. Results There were 1,646 patients allocated to mAFA intervention (mean age, 67.0 years; 38.0% female) with mean follow-up of 262 days, whereas 1,678 patients were allocated to usual care (mean age, 70.0 years; 38.0% female) with mean follow-up of 291 days. Rates of the composite outcome of ‘ischemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism, death, and rehospitalization’ were lower with the mAFA intervention compared with usual care (1.9% vs. 6.0%; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22 to 0.67; p < 0.001). Rates of rehospitalization were lower with the mAFA intervention (1.2% vs. 4.5%; HR: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.60; p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses by sex, age, AF type, risk score, and comorbidities demonstrated consistently lower HRs for the composite outcome for patients receiving the mAFA intervention compared with usual care (all p < 0.05). Conclusions An integrated care approach to holistic AF care, supported by mHealth technology, reduces the risks of rehospitalization and clinical adverse events. (Mobile Health [mHealth] technology integrating atrial fibrillation screening and ABC management approach trial; ChiCTR-OOC-17014138)
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