26 research outputs found

    Regarding the editorial by Sau and Ng. 'Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy risk stratification based on clinical or dynamic electrophysiological features: two sides of the same coin'

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    This Letter to the Editor refers to article ‘Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy risk stratification based on clinical or dynamic electrophysiological features: two sides of the same coin’ by Sau A, Ng, FS https://doi.org/10.1093/europace/euad072. ‘Response to the letter to the editor EUPC-D-23-00362 of Richard Saumarez’, by Arunashis Sau and Fu Siong Ng, https://doi.org/10.1093/europace/euad174

    Effectiveness and safety of a single freeze strategy of cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation: an EHRA systematic review and meta-analysis

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    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the effectiveness and safety of cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) performed using a single freeze strategy in comparison to an empiric double ('bonus') freeze strategy. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases from inception to 12 July 2020, for prospective and retrospective studies of patients undergoing cryoballoon for paroxysmal or persistent AF comparing a single vs. bonus freeze strategy. The main outcome was atrial arrhythmia-free survival and eligible studies required at least 12 months of follow-up; the primary safety outcome was a composite of all complications. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Thirteen studies (3 randomized controlled trials and 10 observational studies) comprising 3163 patients were eligible for inclusion (64% males, 71.5% paroxysmal AF, mean CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.3 ± 0.9). There was no significant difference in pooled effectiveness between single freeze strategy compared to double freeze strategy [relative risk (RR) 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-1.07; I2 = 0%]. Single freeze procedures were associated with a significantly lower adverse event rate (RR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.53-0.98; I2 = 0%) and shorter average procedure time (90 ± 27 min vs. 121 ± 36 min, P < 0.001). A trend for lower risk of persistent phrenic nerve palsy was observed (RR 0.61; 95% CI: 0.37-1.01; I2 = 0%). The quality of included studies was moderate/good, with no evidence of significant publication bias. Single freeze strategy for cryoballoon of AF is as effective as an empiric double ('bonus') freeze strategy while appearing safer and probably quicker

    Novel algorithm for arrhythmogenic focus localization in patients with right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmias

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    Background: Previously presented new electrocardiography (ECG) algorithm for localization of arrhythmogenic focus (AFo) in right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) was based on spontaneous arrhythmia QRS morphology analysis. The aim of this study was to estimate the clinical value of our RVOT algorithm in a prospective study.Methods and results: Algorithm validation was made on 62 patients with RVOT arrhythmias (45 women), mean age 41.6 ± 14.3 years, scheduled for transcatheter ablation. Results of preablation ECG analysis with RVOT algorithm were matched with successful ablation sites and statistical indices: sensitivity (sens), specificity (spec), and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for algorithm and for each of 9 RVOT zones (septal and free wall). An algorithm precisely localized AFo in 57 out of 62 patients (sens 91.3%, spec 99%, PPV 91%, NPV 98.8%). Sensitivity values for superior RVOT aspect (71% patients) varied from 88% to 100%, specificity from 95.9% to 100%; PPV values from 85.7% to 100%, NPV from 92.5% to 100%. Although the total number of patients was relatively small in the 2 remaining RVOT aspects (29% patients) high values (sens, spec, PPV, NPV) were gained for intermediate and inferior zones.Conclusions: On the basis of spontaneous arrhythmia QRS analysis, a novel algorithm was built for preablation localization of RVOT arrhythmia in 1 of the 9 RVOT zones. Prospective analysis of our ECG algorithm confirmed that it is a valuable tool to predict the site of successful ablation in patients with RVOT arrhythmias.

    Should lethal arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy be predicted using non-electrophysiological methods?

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    While sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is due to arrhythmias, the guidelines for prediction of SCD are based solely on non-electrophysiological methods. This study aims to stimulate thinking about whether the interests of patients with HCM are better served by using current, 'risk factor', methods of prediction or by further development of electrophysiological methods to determine arrhythmic risk. Five published predictive studies of SCD in HCM, which contain sufficient data to permit analysis, were analysed to compute receiver operating characteristics together with their confidence bounds to compare their formal prediction either by bootstrapping or Monte Carlo analysis. Four are based on clinical risk factors, one with additional MRI analysis, and were regarded as exemplars of the risk factor approach. The other used an electrophysiological method and directly compared this method to risk factors in the same patients. Prediction methods that use conventional clinical risk factors and MRI have low predictive capacities that will only detect 50-60% of patients at risk with a 15-30% false positive rate [area under the curve (AUC) = ∼0.7], while the electrophysiological method detects 90% of events with a 20% false positive rate (AUC = ∼0.89). Given improved understanding of complex arrhythmogenesis, arrhythmic SCD is likely to be more accurately predictable using electrophysiologically based approaches as opposed to current guidelines and should drive further development of electrophysiologically based methods

    Clinical, echocardiographic, and pacing parameters affecting atrial fibrillation burden in patients with tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome

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    Background: The influence of various factors on atrial fibrillation (AF) development in the population of tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome (TBS) patients remains unclear. There are no data on the impact of different right ventricular pacing percentage (RVp%) profiles. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the AF burden (AFB) and various clinical, echocardiographic, and pacing parameters in TBS patients. Methods: We performed a prospective, one-year registry of TBS patients with documented AF referred for dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD) implantation. Results: The data of 65 patients were analysed. The median 12-month RVp% and AFB was 9.4% and 1.0%, respectively. During the follow-up 14% of patients had no AF (p = 0.003), and the withdrawal of AF symptoms was observed in 49% of patients (p &lt; 0.0001). The AFB was related to the left atrium diameter (r = 0.31, p = 0.02), especially in the subjects with left ventricular ejection fraction &lt; 60% (r = 0.44, p = 0.04). Based on the relative change of RVp%, three groups of various RVp% profile were established: stable, decreasing, and increasing RVp%. In the stable RVp% group (n = 21) there was a quadratic correlation between the 12-month RVp% and AFB (r = 0.71, p = 0.0003). In the stable RVp% &gt; 20% subgroup there was a significant increase of AFB in comparison to the RVp% ≤ 20% subgroup (ΔAFB 1.8% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.03, respectively). In the increasing RVp% group (n = 28) the AFB increased whereas in the decreasing RVp% (n = 16) it remained stable (ΔAFB 0.67% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.034, respectively). Conclusions: DDD implantation in TBS patients is related to a significant reduction in AF symptoms, and left atrial diameter correlates with cumulative AFB in the mid-term observation. Stable RVp% &gt; 20% is associated with AF progression whereas lower stable RVp% may stabilise AF development. Increasing RVp% may be associated with the AFB increase in comparison to the decreasing RVp% subgroup in which AFB remains stable.Background: The influence of various factors on atrial fibrillation (AF) development in the population of tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome (TBS) patients remains unclear. There are no data on the impact of different right ventricular pacing percentage (RVp%) profiles. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the AF burden (AFB) and various clinical, echocardiographic, and pacing parameters in TBS patients. Methods: We performed a prospective, one-year registry of TBS patients with documented AF referred for dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD) implantation. Results: The data of 65 patients were analysed. The median 12-month RVp% and AFB was 9.4% and 1.0%, respectively. During the follow-up 14% of patients had no AF (p = 0.003), and the withdrawal of AF symptoms was observed in 49% of patients (p &lt; 0.0001). The AFB was related to the left atrium diameter (r = 0.31, p = 0.02), especially in the subjects with left ventricular ejection fraction &lt; 60% (r = 0.44, p = 0.04). Based on the relative change of RVp%, three groups of various RVp% profile were established: stable, decreasing, and increasing RVp%. In the stable RVp% group (n = 21) there was a quadratic correlation between the 12-month RVp% and AFB (r = 0.71, p = 0.0003). In the stable RVp% &gt; 20% subgroup there was a significant increase of AFB in comparison to the RVp% ≤ 20% subgroup (ΔAFB 1.8% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.03, respectively). In the increasing RVp% group (n = 28) the AFB increased whereas in the decreasing RVp% (n = 16) it remained stable (ΔAFB 0.67% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.034, respectively). Conclusions: DDD implantation in TBS patients is related to a significant reduction in AF symptoms, and left atrial diameter correlates with cumulative AFB in the mid-term observation. Stable RVp% &gt; 20% is associated with AF progression whereas lower stable RVp% may stabilise AF development. Increasing RVp% may be associated with the AFB increase in comparison to the decreasing RVp% subgroup in which AFB remains stable
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